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Saw Kerf comparison.

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Project by bluekingfisher posted 11-08-2018 11:07 PM 713 views 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Firstly, apologies for posting this as a separate project. However I cannot find a way to link it to two previously listed recent projects pertaining to dovetail/backsaws I posted earlier in the week.

The first project, listed 3 or 4 days ago was in relation to a 100+ year old dovetail saw, manufactured by Colver Bros. the second was in relation to a replacement handle for a small 10” back saw, which was at one time used in a Secondary school woodwork department. I mistakenly referred to this saw as a dovetail saw in the project headline.

Someone observed the kerf cuts, as part of the photograph listing, looked more akin to a backsaw, which of course it is. Anyway, the posters comment got me thinking. I wondered if the kerfs in the school backsaw differed significantly to the Colver saw? So, I made a few simple rip cuts in pine to gauge the difference. In addition, I included a contempary saw made by Lie Nielsen as a further comparison.

Judge for yourselves in the above photos. however, to my eye the LN kerf looks the most ragged, it certainly was the least smooth through the cut. The Colver saw was unbelievably smooth, although to be fair, the LN is fairly new and still has the factory tooth geometry and set.

All the saws have a similar amount of teeth and all are filed for rip cuts.

Ignore the dark stains at the beginning of the kerf lines, this is just protective oil from the saw plate which has been amplified by the camera.

The image of the two saws together are the saws I posted in the projects section earlier this week.

Just a little fun, happy to answer any questions on the matter.

David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan





6 comments so far

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

1123 posts in 3468 days


#1 posted 11-09-2018 02:04 AM

Darn you, now my long list includes doing the same test with my saws to determine which one is best for what I want to do. Actually, will make my life a little easier.
Steve.

View bluekingfisher's profile

bluekingfisher

1282 posts in 3153 days


#2 posted 11-09-2018 10:03 AM



Darn you, now my long list includes doing the same test with my saws to determine which one is best for what I want to do. Actually, will make my life a little easier.
Steve.

- SteveMI


As I mentioned, Steve, just a little fun. Although once you start it’s quite addictive. Not only does one start to consider the size, rake fleam, set on the teeth etc. I now find myself wondering about different types of woods to cut. Anyway, all this nonsense keeps me out of the way of SWMBO. Lol

David.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2598 posts in 3134 days


#3 posted 11-10-2018 06:56 PM

Saw where there is a 5/64 kerf blade available. That is thin! Thanks for the research.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10499 posts in 1659 days


#4 posted 11-10-2018 07:22 PM

I’m making some with .015 plates. I think that’s about as thin as you’d want one for a western style saw.

Nice refurbs. You did them justice.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View bluekingfisher's profile

bluekingfisher

1282 posts in 3153 days


#5 posted 11-12-2018 09:41 PM



Saw where there is a 5/64 kerf blade available. That is thin! Thanks for the research.

- Knothead62


Thanks for commenting. Glad I could be of assistance.
David

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View bluekingfisher's profile

bluekingfisher

1282 posts in 3153 days


#6 posted 11-12-2018 09:41 PM


I’m making some with .015 plates. I think that’s about as thin as you’d want one for a western style saw.

Nice refurbs. You did them justice.

- TheFridge


Thank you for taking the time to comment.
As far as I can tell, old English saw makers of the day were able to make the plates that thin, as traditionally drawer boxes and other small cabinet joinery where dovetail saws were preferred were cutting boards of around 5/16” or so. Certainly antique British fine furniture is testament to this. You will not find many drawers with sides much thicker than mentioned. Thicker boards were likely to choke the gullets of the teeth, and of course more likely to kink or stress the saw plate. Bearing in mind too, in days of yore, thenold timers were under immense pressure to knock parts out at an alarming rate therefore unlikely to be taking too much care of their saws while working.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

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