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"Big Red" Wagon

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Project by Paul Bucalo posted 11-04-2018 03:00 PM 1110 views 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was a quick, few-days build for support at a local event this past summer. It turned out not to be needed. Over the winter I will polyurethane the stake sides and apply another coat of red enamel paint to the handle and chassis. Otherwise, this is complete.

I was surprised at how easy it is to manuver with the front casters, which take a lot of stress off of the handle’s pivot point. By the way, the handle mount was derived from a miscellanous (no idea where it came from or was used for) bracket I found in the dungeon. The fact that this worked was a welcomed surprised.

The handle is white oak with oak doweling for the hand piece. Chassis is made up of pine pallet beams and 2”x6” pine construction-grade board.

Bicycle handlebar wrap for the grips. Furniture feet caps for the handle bar ends. Rubber grommets on either side of the handle pivot point are the feet from an old stereo receiver.

As you can imagine, this is quite heavy. I struggle to lift this without the handle and stake sides. It will be a great yard tool this next year.

-- Paul, Upstate New York, USA





14 comments so far

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

13211 posts in 3039 days


#1 posted 11-04-2018 04:03 PM

Looks pretty sofisticated…nice colour and very precise work.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View LesB's profile

LesB

1838 posts in 3614 days


#2 posted 11-04-2018 05:34 PM

Wagons are always handy to have.
I made some quite similar to that for the grandkids a few years ago. Now I see I can buy one at Harbor Freight for less than I paid for the hardware (wheels and brackets) back then.

-- Les B, Oregon

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

5254 posts in 2438 days


#3 posted 11-04-2018 06:09 PM

A very nice, usable tool build.

Not a”Calvin” type coaster wagon though; due to the caster—(not steerable) front wheels. I am positive that for yard work it will be fantastic help.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7263 posts in 3539 days


#4 posted 11-04-2018 06:18 PM

Pretty and sturdy, nice work!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

687 posts in 1531 days


#5 posted 11-04-2018 07:51 PM



Looks pretty sofisticated…nice colour and very precise work.

- majuvla

Thanks, but it just looks that way. The build was simple. Really.

-- Paul, Upstate New York, USA

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

687 posts in 1531 days


#6 posted 11-04-2018 07:53 PM



Wagons are always handy to have.
I made some quite similar to that for the grandkids a few years ago. Now I see I can buy one at Harbor Freight for less than I paid for the hardware (wheels and brackets) back then.

- LesB

I looked at the Harbor Freight offering before building this. It was too small for my needs. The wheels for this came from Harbor Freight, and you’re so wright about the cost difference. I spent about $10 more for the four wheels than the small wagon would have costed.

-- Paul, Upstate New York, USA

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

687 posts in 1531 days


#7 posted 11-04-2018 07:55 PM



A very nice, usable tool build.

Not a”Calvin” type coaster wagon though; due to the caster—(not steerable) front wheels. I am positive that for yard work it will be fantastic help.

- ralbuck

I thought I was going to be disappointed in using castors up front. I wasn’t. Time will tell if the oak handle’s pivot point will last. It has worked well so far.

As for it not being a C&H worth wagon…that’s a good thing. I would have had to test out on a nearby hill had it that kind of steering. ;)

-- Paul, Upstate New York, USA

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

687 posts in 1531 days


#8 posted 11-04-2018 07:57 PM



Pretty and sturdy, nice work!

- oldnovice

Thanks. I just had to make it look like an overgrown Radio Flyer. We will see how stury it is next Spring, when I make it earn its keep around the house.

-- Paul, Upstate New York, USA

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

21504 posts in 3277 days


#9 posted 11-04-2018 11:00 PM

That is a nice looking and handy wagon!! You may get orders for more!!

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

687 posts in 1531 days


#10 posted 11-05-2018 04:03 AM



That is a nice looking and handy wagon!! You may get orders for more!!

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Thanks, Jim! Orders? Well, you never know. :)

-- Paul, Upstate New York, USA

View drbyte's profile

drbyte

815 posts in 4234 days


#11 posted 11-05-2018 02:02 PM

Nice job, but what are you hauling, baby elephants or anvils?

-- Dennis, WV

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

687 posts in 1531 days


#12 posted 11-05-2018 02:32 PM



Nice job, but what are you hauling, baby elephants or anvils?

- drbyte

The design is based on two factors: 1) the need for a wagon to haul plastic crates filled with the wife’s canned jams and pickles (between the truck parked on the street and our tent on the park), and 2) utilizing as much as possible the wood and hardware I already had on hand.

The trailing and caster pneumatic wheels were purchased earlier in the year. I had planned on making a wagon, eventually, to help out on the property. The steering handle hinge is just something I found in the dungeon workshop. It solved the steering problem. I haven’t a clue what it went to. I suppose someday I will find what it went to and realize I still need it. ;) The rest of the hardware (bolts, washers, nuts, stake side brackets and clasps, tie-down brackets, etc.) that I didn’t already have were purchased.

The dimensions were a collaboration (compromise) between the length of the pallet runner beams I had laying around and the minimal dimensions needed to haul two crates in tandem, stacked two high.

Now that the event it was originally designed for is over, it will be useful on the property. You see, I have these rogue elephants that like to get into my rhododendrons…

-- Paul, Upstate New York, USA

View laurentco's profile

laurentco

2 posts in 980 days


#13 posted 11-05-2018 04:10 PM

I love it! I was looking to buy something like this for the yard. I think I will steal as much info as I can from your photos and description.

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

687 posts in 1531 days


#14 posted 11-05-2018 05:02 PM



I love it! I was looking to buy something like this for the yard. I think I will steal as much info as I can from your photos and description.

- laurentco

Sounds like a plan!

Keep in mind that the handle’s hinge is based on what I happened to already have. I don’t know if it is sturdy enough to handle moving a heavy load on soft ground, especially the side loads from pulling it sideways to get it to turn. I didn’t experience any concerns with a light load.

The rubber feet used as spacers between the handle and the bracket were a convenience, but if I had to build another I would used wood or metal instead. I would also add a sleeve bushing to the bolt that goes through the handle. That might help with friction when tightened down and keep the bolt from gouging the hole in the handle with use.

By the way, the reason for the wing nuts on hinge bracket are two fold. The first is so I can easily take the handle off for transport of the wagon in the back of my F-150 pickup, which sports a tonneau cover. The second to add and release tension on the connection. The rubber spacers need it to keep the handle from wobbling and ruining its pivot hole, while the lower bolt is used to even the tension across the bracket’s end.

An alternative to the use of this metal bracket is to run 2 – 2”x4” beams, attached to the chassis on their edge, with a wood block at both ends and in the middle of its length the same thickness as the handle’s width, plus added space for washers. 1-1/2” of softwood on either side of the handle should be sufficient to take side loads. I also strongly suggest you stick with these large pneumatic wheels. They have heavy duty ball bearings at the axles, and grease fittings at their pivots. The large tires made negotiating curbs and grass really easy. I got mine at Harbor Freight for about $13 a piece.

If you do built one, post it and make sure you let me know.

-- Paul, Upstate New York, USA

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