LumberJocks

Parallelogram In Overarm Dust Collector and Guard

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Project by John Veazey posted 10-03-2018 04:53 PM 793 views 11 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The parallelogram allows the collector-guard to be easily adjusted for the thickness of the board being cut or to be moved up, out of the way, when changing blades. The dimensions provided below allow a 20-in. lift for the collector-guard. The friction at the 4 connection points in the parallelogram keep the device stable in any position.

Wondering why it works, as I write this, I checked the balance provided by the weight. I loosened the two knobs and two wing nuts. It was not at the balance point, but it moved up. I moved the weight to the balance position and the unit was stable at any position but a small force could easily move it. Tightening the two wing nuts and the two knobs to medium settings (whatever this might mean) gave a good feel of stability in all positions.

I have been using it over a year and have not noticed any need to change the knob settings as being a problem. I should add that I live on the desert where the air is dry most of the time. I don’t know if this is a contributor to the good performance. I used Poplar for the wooden parts and where moving parts are joined, they are separated by an ordinary flat steel washer.

The parallelogram is constructed with 1 5/8” square posts (vertical) and 1/2×1” rails. The posts are each 15” long. The top and bottom rails are 31” and 24” long, respectively. Four 1/4×3” carriage bolts join the posts and rails together. The holes in the posts are on 8 1/2” centers while the rail holes are on 19” centers. The top rail measures 10 3/4” from the post hole to the end of the rail to allow a place to set the weight.

There is a 1/4-in. flat washer at the connection points under the rails, the knobs and the wing nuts. The 3 1/4-in. dia, 5-in. long carbon steel rod I used weighs 11.1 lbs.

The pipe from the ceiling is a piece of 2-in. copper that I had no better use for. It connects to the ceiling with a repurposed mount from a satellite TV antenna. Three guide wires with turnbuckles keep it rigid. The parallelogram post attaches to the 2-in. pipe with a 1/2-in. dowel. A hole saw was used to cut a plug 1 5/8-in.-long that would fit in the end of the pipe. Tape was used to improve the fit. The hole in the plug that the hole saw made was enlarged to 1/2-in. and a 1/2-in. hole was cut in the center of the post using a dowel jig. The plug was then glued on the end of the post using a 1/2-in. dowel, 2-in. long. Three small screws keep the pipe and the post together.

The collector-guard, the post hardware with the large black knob are from Shark Guard. The knob tightens the connection of the collector-guard with the post to keep it parallel with the top of the saw or at some other setting you might like. The large knob makes a good hand hold when moving the collector-guard up or down

-- John Veazey





7 comments so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3530 posts in 2136 days


#1 posted 10-03-2018 04:58 PM

Great ideas and well done!

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2076 posts in 2786 days


#2 posted 10-03-2018 08:49 PM

Interesting. Maybe I need one of those.

View John Veazey's profile

John Veazey

8 posts in 29 days


#3 posted 10-03-2018 09:10 PM

Well, It sure has reduced the sawdust in my shop.

-- John Veazey

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1410 posts in 722 days


#4 posted 10-04-2018 07:58 AM

“It connects to the ceiling with a re-purposed mount from a satellite TV antenna.”

Lol I always look at pics first, all I had was Whatttt?

Anything that covers the blade so your fingers cannot gain entry when it is spinning is a good idea. I think I would prefer a splitter with AKB pawls, but you do have what looks like a splitter in place. Sure much better than nothing at all.

“The collector-guard, the post hardware with the large black knob are from Shark Guard.”

I thought the guard looked familiar. I would be more in favor of using an entire Shark, splitter. pawls, and all, and using your rig just to support the dust collection tube from above, much safer, and better use of resources if you have a Shark already.

-- Think safe, be safe

View John Veazey's profile

John Veazey

8 posts in 29 days


#5 posted 10-04-2018 07:20 PM

Steve:
Thanks for your comments.
I agree that the installation would be safer with anti-kickback pawls installed. However the guard would then have to be attached to the saw which means it would have to be disconnected to move it out of the way. I like to be able to just lift the guard up out of the way rather than taking it off. But safety usually comes at a price. Perhaps there’s a way to have both – the safety of the pawls and the convenience of easily lifting the guard up out of the way.

-- John Veazey

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1410 posts in 722 days


#6 posted 10-04-2018 07:40 PM

Actually there are a few, depends if you want to spend the money, or you could get some wheels and roll your own. Thing about the ones for sale is they are somewhat canted so the stock is not only held but it keeps it against the fence.

Board Buddies

Plan B

I only picked the 2 above because they both showed the product mounted on the saw. A lot of folks see these, and don’t know what they are for. Pricing may be MUCH better at other vendors, who choose not to show a mounted picture.

If you are making very narrow cuts, these would force you to leave the “offcut” on the non fence side of the blade, but there are works arounds for anything, and if safety is important then sometimes doing it “how everybody else does it” might not be so safe. That goes for both, using these anti kick back devices, or cutting thin stock.

-- Think safe, be safe

View John Veazey's profile

John Veazey

8 posts in 29 days


#7 posted 10-07-2018 01:05 AM

I just ordered the pawls from Shark Guard. I’m hoping I can leave the large splitter with the pawls attached on the saw most of the time and just lift the guard up and off the mounting posts clamped to the top of the splitter.

-- John Veazey

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