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Rustic live edge stool

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Project by rivergirl posted 1400 days ago 2258 views 0 times favorited 32 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a rustic live edge stool. Mystery wood not oak- . Finish is 3 coats tung oil and 3 coats minwax poly. Height is 15 inches, length is approx. 18 inches- width about 14 inches. Mortise and tenon; through tenons legs to top.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."





32 comments so far

View TheGravedigger's profile

TheGravedigger

963 posts in 2660 days


#1 posted 1400 days ago

Ah, who cares what kind of wood it is? Make something out of it anyway! Another nice piece.

-- Robert - Visit my woodworking blog: http://littlegoodpieces.wordpress.com

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1474 days


#2 posted 1400 days ago

My thoughts exactly digger. :)

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4119 posts in 1492 days


#3 posted 1400 days ago

Wow Kelly you have been busy.
This is a great wee stool.
It is so unique, that the nice thing about live edge.
You can do several and they will all be different.

Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5352 posts in 2221 days


#4 posted 1400 days ago

Lovely ! Although I don’t normally like rustic ,this is very nice. It took me ages with this, and the plant stand ,to understand what the circular part underneath was LOL well done kindest regards Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1474 days


#5 posted 1400 days ago

Sorry, the circular part underneath is a big oak log that I planed, sanded and finished with spar. I guess I should have taken the pics on the porch instead of on the log. Maybe I will retake them? I sold a stump like that this week. ;)

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View mafe's profile

mafe

9492 posts in 1725 days


#6 posted 1400 days ago

You are now my lavagirl, no more river.
Smiles,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View BarbS's profile

BarbS

2434 posts in 2721 days


#7 posted 1400 days ago

You must have a Most interesting house. Great stool.

-- http://barbsid.blogspot.com/

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1474 days


#8 posted 1400 days ago

Barbs- if you look in my project files you will see some pictures of the house. Right now it is a dust pit and the floors need refinished. The house is a mission style bungalow about 1900-1910. Its a nice big bungalow on the river- but like I said a dust pit. I don’t think it has ever been as clean as when those photos were taken LOL

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View Bovine's profile

Bovine

114 posts in 1964 days


#9 posted 1400 days ago

I really like the finish. The Oil + Poly makes a good combination on that top!

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1474 days


#10 posted 1400 days ago

Thanks Bovine. I always use oil under the finish. It helps to preserve/rejuvenate the slab wood I think? And it makes for a deeper more uniform final finish… I think?

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View mainerustic's profile

mainerustic

53 posts in 1503 days


#11 posted 1400 days ago

I’m very impressed and where do you get all of your beautiful wood?

-- Maine Rustic

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1474 days


#12 posted 1400 days ago

Thanks Mainerustic. (You know that I love your stuff too.) I often get my wood from the free pile- as in trash/burn pile at the lumbermill. Also- my friends who cut trees tend to save me a couple logs/slabs and drop them off in my front yard. I rarely buy wood. The small stuff for the legs/siderails I cut and dry in the garage. The downside to using only free lumber is I have to build around the wood that I have. But I can usually figure out something to do with it. The upside is that I can price it cheap enough to sell it (sometimes.) Len says, “That’s okay if noone buys your stuff- just keep stacking it up in here.” LOL

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4119 posts in 1492 days


#13 posted 1400 days ago

Len has much wisdom.
Once you have a large collection it will give your customers a large selection.
Folk are fickle they like a choice.
Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2876 posts in 1721 days


#14 posted 1400 days ago

You have been busy, I like your work and the house, a little dust never hurt anyone. The rustic look has
very much going for it and having friends who think of enough of you to give you wood to make pieces of
art is no small achievement either. That stove just invites a person to set and look and think. Len not
only has much wisdom, he is very lucky to have someone like you to share such a house and fire with. The
added touch of your work must help very much. The river also helps, my river is about a half mile away,
and I have to make do with a creek running by to the west of my property. Thank you for sharing not only
your work, but your companionship with all of us.

As ever, Gus the 71 yr young laborer, trying to become a carpenters apprentice.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1474 days


#15 posted 1400 days ago

I generally plane and sand the night before- so like one hour there probably- then in the morning I cut the mortises and cut and install the legs- maybe like 2 hours max. Then the finish- takes a few minutes over a couple of days. Because I use all bent/twisted lumber I have to cut each piece individually to fit, so I can’t mass produce anything, including legs/siderails so it takes some time. I am able to work a bit faster now so I started using fast set glue on the smaller projects- that saves on the wait time. Of course the bigger tables take quite a bit longer. And no, I don’t make the “standard” 20 bucks an hour plus materials when I sell them. LOL

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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