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Made my first zero clearance insert.

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Project by MikeDVB posted 08-13-2018 02:41 AM 1308 views 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Most of the woodworking I’ve done has been what I would call “construction grade”. I am wanting to start working on finer projects that require more accuracy and attention to detail.

I decided the first thing I should do is make a zero clearance insert. I had a piece of red oak that was large enough so I traced the outline of the stock insert onto it.

I cut the blank out at the band saw and used the disc sander to fine tune the outline.

Once it fit into the slot on the saw I found it didn’t sit level so I had to cut out a notch on the back along the edge.

I then ran it over the jointer to get it down to the thickness I wanted and I managed to get it perfect to the point I don’t need leveling screws.

It’s also a tight fit to the saw table – it’s snug but not too snug.

I had to remove some material from the back to make clearance for the riving knife adjustment screws although removed more area than needed.

I also had to lengthen the slot cut by the blade to make room for the riving knife. I ended up cutting the slot longer than needed by about 1/4” because I thought it was the knife raising the plate but it ended up being the knife adjustment screws.

I also managed to knick the front right edge by the finger hole when jointing just due to letting pressure off the piece a little too early before the blades fully stopped – I didn’t realize I had slid the piece back a little.

All in all I’m happy with the results but if I have to do it again, and I’m sure I’ll make another – or two – I’ll use what I learned on this one to make better ones. Namely I’ll cut the slot the right distance for the knife and I’ll only remove the material necessary on the bottom to clear the knife set screws.

Now to make my cross cut sled and picture frame jigs. ;-)

-- Mike





7 comments so far

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

1228 posts in 722 days


#1 posted 08-13-2018 02:50 AM

Here's a suggestion for a great picture frame jig. I really like it because it’s deadly accurate and it cuts the frame to the dimensions of the insert regardless of the frame size or width of the frame rails.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View MikeDVB's profile

MikeDVB

180 posts in 1300 days


#2 posted 08-13-2018 02:59 AM



Here s a suggestion for a great picture frame jig. I really like it because it s deadly accurate and it cuts the frame to the dimensions of the insert regardless of the frame size or width of the frame rails.

- Andybb

Yeah that’s the one I plan on making. My number one hobby is photography so I’ll be making a lot of frames. No sense in doing it the hard way every time ;-).

-- Mike

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1128 posts in 1754 days


#3 posted 08-13-2018 04:28 PM

Nicely done Mike.
I have made a few of those myself.
Each time I was able to improve upon the previous.

-- There' are two theories to arguin' with a woman. Neither one works.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

32061 posts in 2985 days


#4 posted 08-13-2018 07:20 PM

You did a fine job on these inserts,

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1217 posts in 692 days


#5 posted 08-14-2018 02:03 AM

Lot of good in this. A skill learned, one which no doubt you will need again. Plus you get the use of an insert which will offer a sweeter cut, and add an aspect of safety on those thin slivers we all shave off.

Nice job, and thanks for posting. Whats next? Table saw sled would get used a lot, but there are so many things.

-- Think safe, be safe

View MikeDVB's profile

MikeDVB

180 posts in 1300 days


#6 posted 08-15-2018 06:12 PM



Lot of good in this. A skill learned, one which no doubt you will need again. Plus you get the use of an insert which will offer a sweeter cut, and add an aspect of safety on those thin slivers we all shave off.

Nice job, and thanks for posting. Whats next? Table saw sled would get used a lot, but there are so many things.

- therealSteveN


I have an Incra Miter 1000HD which I really like but I still want to build a cross-cut sled. After the sled is the picture frame jig and then the spline jig.

The main thing I want to make on a regular basis is picture frames as my other hobby is photography :).

-- Mike

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1217 posts in 692 days


#7 posted 08-16-2018 06:13 PM

You can save a ton on making your own frames over buying them made, soon your house will be full of beautiful art, you created. Both the pics, and the frames, win win.

One thing to do if you plan a lot of miter cuts, especially miters you want tight is read, and learn all you can about creep. Creep is when the stock you are cutting moves from the pull of the blade going through the wood. That was more chop saw

This is more about TS, same thing happening, wood movement.

It can occur on a Miter saw, but usually more on a TS. With the miter saw you are holding the stock pretty tight to the fence, on a TS you get concerned more about pushing through the blade, and NOT getting cut evidently a lot of folks forget to keep holding the piece still. If you get cuts that look even a little bit scooped, consider putting some kind of clamp on your miter gauge, or sled to prevent any movement as the piece goes through the blade.

If frames are on the menu often, you may want to search for an older Lion trimmer (wood Guillotine) You still make your miter cut on the TS, but the Lion takes off just a smidge off the end of the cut to finalize it, also cleaves the wood off clean as a babies bottom. Your time spent on sanding, or trying to fit a miter that is just off a bit, well it just goes away. There are newer ones available, they are just looser than a Lion. If you can rehab an old Lion, they are killer good.

That Incra is pretty good, there is just a world of difference between a miter gauge, and a well made sled. A good sled is so smooth, and the work is so well supported it almost makes the cut for you.

-- Think safe, be safe

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