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End grain cutting board from scraps

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Project by Jeremymcon posted 08-07-2018 08:11 PM 791 views 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My scraps are starting to build up, and I hate throwing all that wood out, so I put this end grain cutting board together from all cherry, maple, walnut, and mahogany scraps I could salvage. I even managed to use some really short scraps, as short as 3”,by running them through my planer glued to a longer scrap.

I leveled the board with my planer also – glued a piece of scrap to the back of it, and took very light passes. My planer takes 1/16th off per turn of the handle, and I probably turned the handle about 16 times to make one full turn. Very light passes. Worked great, with no chipout to anything but the backer board, which I removed after planing.

Sanded to 1000 grit, then wet the board and knocked back the raised grain until it stayed smooth – took 4 cycles of wetting and sanding.

I also don’t have a table saw – just a bandsaw – which made this a bit more challenging. I ended up using my shooting board and a plane to square up some edges where I needed to splice together shorter pieces.

Finished with mineral oil, followed by mineral oil and beeswax blend as a top coat.





13 comments so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

1960 posts in 1890 days


#1 posted 08-07-2018 08:32 PM

Just one question, was that pattern deliberate?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

4844 posts in 2350 days


#2 posted 08-07-2018 08:46 PM

Very pretty. I really like the undercut look too.

Also a great “rescue” too.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

278 posts in 764 days


#3 posted 08-07-2018 08:52 PM



Just one question, was that pattern deliberate?

- Andre

Not at all. I sort of arranged them in a pleasantly random pattern, with sort of an even distribution of colors, but that was it.

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

278 posts in 764 days


#4 posted 08-07-2018 08:53 PM



Very pretty. I really like the undercut look too.

Also a great “rescue” too.

- ralbuck

Thanks! I wasn’t sure how else to make it easy to pick up without carving hand holds into it somehow.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

914 posts in 658 days


#5 posted 08-07-2018 09:57 PM

Nice board, and no wasted scraps, good job.

I assumed TS or router table with a big honkin router to spin a bit large enough to do that chamfer. Cut on the BS with the table tilted?

-- Think safe, be safe

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

278 posts in 764 days


#6 posted 08-07-2018 10:57 PM



Nice board, and no wasted scraps, good job.

I assumed TS or router table with a big honkin router to spin a bit large enough to do that chamfer. Cut on the BS with the table tilted?

- therealSteveN

Yup! Bandsaw with a tilted table. Then cleaned it with a plane and a sander. I couldn’t get the bevel quite perfect enough to leave a nice crisp facet, which is why the line is a bit soft. Rounded it over with the sander.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

5841 posts in 2349 days


#7 posted 08-07-2018 11:42 PM

A really delightful and awesome looking cutting board. Very well executed.

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

1379 posts in 1651 days


#8 posted 08-08-2018 12:38 AM

Very Nice board. Excellent use of wood scraps.

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View John's profile

John

1205 posts in 1354 days


#9 posted 08-08-2018 05:42 AM

Nice job Jeremy, I will try the wetting and sanding on my next set of boards.

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

12678 posts in 2951 days


#10 posted 08-08-2018 05:52 AM

Nice shape and especialy that edge curve.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

278 posts in 764 days


#11 posted 08-08-2018 11:55 AM



Nice job Jeremy, I will try the wetting and sanding on my next set of boards.

- John

I recommend it! Definitely seems to work. I also do that if I sand spoons that I carve. If I leave a knife finish there isn’t any fuzziness. Same is true for hand planed surfaces – they don’t fuzz up when you wet them.

View McaroJCC's profile

McaroJCC

12 posts in 11 days


#12 posted 08-08-2018 04:29 PM

I really like the downward bevel on the edges. Nice job.

BTW, what is the final thickness? Looks beefy.

-- MCaro, St. Charles, MO

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

278 posts in 764 days


#13 posted 08-08-2018 05:10 PM



I really like the downward bevel on the edges. Nice job.

BTW, what is the final thickness? Looks beefy.

- McaroJCC

Yea, it’s a little on the thick side! Lol
Final thickness is 1 7/8”. Plus it had rubber feet on the bottom making it another 1/4” taller.

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