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Jewelry Box

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Project by dgreen50 posted 07-13-2018 02:34 PM 692 views 2 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The Jewelry Box was completed as a project using a frame and rail insert top. This box was a test to learn how to grove small thin parts for boxes. This is the second box I have recently completed using joinery where panels are inserted in a frame( I will post the other box in the near future). This box came out well but created problems when it came time to attach the hinge to the thin lid. To keep the screws from going through the top panel I had to shorten their length. Also had a similar issue with the lid stop (thinness) . A chain was my only option unless someone has a better idea.

The box is made of Granadillo and maple and finished with satin poly. The front panel decoration was cut with a CNC prior to assembly. The maple top came out OK, there are a number of dark imperfections (see photos) in the wood which to me detract from the overall finish, but I did not see them until the panel was cut and sanded. The box and the tray are lined with black felt. Thanks for looking.





13 comments so far

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

924 posts in 660 days


#1 posted 07-13-2018 07:22 PM

Nice box. I understand the problem of a thinner panel, and it also being the largest area of a lid, and how to attach. My suggestion is only look at the thicker frame wood as a placement for a hinge.

What are the thicknesses of both the panel, and the frame of the lid? Knowing this will help with suggestions for hinge, and support ideas. Off hand without know what the thickness is I would suggest looking at hinges the are stopped near 90 to 110 degree so you can eliminate the chain. Probably a thin stopped hinge something like this.

Rockler stop hinge, cut to needed length.

Spendy, but a really nice option for many small sized boxes.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Joe's profile

Joe

476 posts in 1172 days


#2 posted 07-13-2018 09:14 PM

Your box is very nice. I really like the contrasting woods on the lid and around the sides. The CNC work on the front gives the box elegant look. I think you did a great job. Thanks for inspiring

-- CurleyJoe, "You only learn from your mistakes"

View bvdon's profile

bvdon

496 posts in 3100 days


#3 posted 07-13-2018 11:17 PM

Nice details.

View dgreen50's profile

dgreen50

87 posts in 2427 days


#4 posted 07-14-2018 12:18 AM

therealSteveN.

Thanks for the suggestions. The 8” stop hinge is certainly a viable option. The lid frame is only 3/8” thick so very short screws are needed. I did not know Rockler carried a piano style stop hinge. Would have saved me using a chain!

View woodrookieII's profile

woodrookieII

271 posts in 2749 days


#5 posted 07-14-2018 01:13 AM

Really, really, really like your box.

And thanks for the tip on the Rockler piano hinge with stop!

....rookieII

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5491 posts in 2494 days


#6 posted 07-14-2018 01:26 AM

Nice looking box.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View tomd's profile

tomd

2164 posts in 3856 days


#7 posted 07-14-2018 02:21 AM

Nice work, great box. I have solved similar problems with stop hinges, you can get several sizes at Craft.com. and they are inexpensive.

-- Tom D

View Rick S.'s profile

Rick S.

10142 posts in 3118 days


#8 posted 07-14-2018 03:01 AM

Very Nice Work & Well Done!

-- If it wasn't for Electricity, We'd all be Watching Television by Candlelight!

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

31994 posts in 2952 days


#9 posted 07-14-2018 01:08 PM

This is an outstanding jewelry box and displays a lot of wonderful details and fine craftsmanship.

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2210 posts in 1308 days


#10 posted 07-14-2018 01:38 PM

A hearty second (or third) on the stop hinges. They work well.

Alternatively, you can carefully design the lid dimensions to allow the rear of the lid to act as the stop.

Thin lids are a pain for screws! At least with the piano hinge you get plenty of connections. For these cases, I also clip the screw tips and add a small drop of epoxy into the holes to help beef up the wood for the added stress.

Another alternative is to use machine screws with through holes in the lid and install decorative nuts or a nut plate onto the top of the lid.

I really like the look of that Granadillo and engraving!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

924 posts in 660 days


#11 posted 07-15-2018 04:27 AM


therealSteveN.

Thanks for the suggestions. The 8” stop hinge is certainly a viable option. The lid frame is only 3/8” thick so very short screws are needed. I did not know Rockler carried a piano style stop hinge. Would have saved me using a chain!

- dgreen50

I’ve found Rockler has sourced almost anything you may need, it’s just if you can afford it.

I had doubled back to look, Congrats on your 3.

Splinter I have done that using the lid to stop itself a number of times. Usually when the budget said, nope to 30 bux for hinges, and I could use brand x for a few bux. It is a great idea. But thin lids, what can you do? The lines say they often have to be or appear too clunky. Sawed off screws are the best I have been able to figure.

-- Think safe, be safe

View NormG's profile

NormG

6216 posts in 3089 days


#12 posted 07-15-2018 09:40 PM

Great design and love the details

-- Norman - I never never make a mistake, I just change the design.

View mcoyfrog's profile

mcoyfrog

4252 posts in 3680 days


#13 posted 07-30-2018 05:18 PM

Sweet!!!

-- Wood and Glass they kick (well you know) Have a great day - Dug

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