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Live Edge Waterfall Coffee Table

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Project by TimberAndAshDesigns posted 07-03-2018 04:49 PM 1097 views 2 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

While visiting some friends of mine who are starting a small sawmill business I spotted a small stack of unique forked maple slabs neatly stacked in one end of their quonset. Wanting to try my hand a waterfall coffee table I knew immediately one of those slabs would be my guinea pig. And that is where the story began.

Bringing the slab home I noticed that it was slightly twisted, so much so that it needed to be flattened before anything was built from it. Since my router setup for flattening slabs only accommodates slabs up to about 34” wide I had to first build a new jig. In comes the mobile flattening sled.

With this sled I was able to get the slab relatively flat. Now, how am I going to cut the miter? I have a cordless dewalt circular saw but I knew that was not going to be accurate or powerful enough for the job. I have a Festool TS75 tracksaw on my list of needed tools but, I just couldn’t bite the bullet at the time. Next up, utilize the 52” capacity on my SawStop and rig up a sled. With some help from my #1 employee, my wonderful wife, we cut the miter fairly well. Now, back to the flattening part. I flattened the topside of the slab pretty closely but in an attempt to save thickness and keep some of the natural elements I left the bottom side somewhat twisted. In the midst of cutting the miter the slab rocked slightly which caused the miter to be arched a little bit. Some quick work with my block plane and we were back in action.

Now to fill the giant hole that was in the slab. I cleaned this out well and masked off the backside with some sheathing tape. Using a combination of Black Diamond Pigments (Mahogany) and Total Boat epoxy I filled the void as well as some cracks level with the surface. Once the epoxy dried and the slab was sanded smooth it was assembly time.

To attached the newly formed leg to the top I used my Festool Domino 500. This was a life saver. I was concerned about getting a true 90° waterfall but the Domino combined with some 90° Rockler clamps and it was a breeze. I was left with a slight gap and the inside of the bend which I filled with the mahogany tinted epoxy before finishing. One the other end I used 5/4 poplar painted with Rustoleum Metallic paint to give it a metal look. This leg was attached with threaded inserts and 1/4” truss head machine screws.

Once assembled and sanded it was time for finishing. For this table I opted to use Waterlox Original. After 4 coats of Waterlox and sufficient drying time this piece was ready for display and for its new owner to take it home.

Thanks for reading!

-Jacob
Timber & Ash Designs

-- I live on caffeine, sawdust and swear words. https://timberandashdesigns.com/





11 comments so far

View snufalufegus's profile

snufalufegus

3 posts in 529 days


#1 posted 07-03-2018 05:49 PM

beautiful! I love the flattening jig. Never seen one on castors before. How difficult was that to design/build?

-- HOUSTON STRONG

View TimberAndAshDesigns's profile

TimberAndAshDesigns

42 posts in 111 days


#2 posted 07-03-2018 06:27 PM



beautiful! I love the flattening jig. Never seen one on castors before. How difficult was that to design/build?

- snufalufegus

Thanks! It was not difficult at all. A couple hours of work. I’m in the process of design a more refined version that will provide some additional stability.

-- I live on caffeine, sawdust and swear words. https://timberandashdesigns.com/

View swirt's profile

swirt

3178 posts in 3120 days


#3 posted 07-04-2018 01:52 AM

Very nice. I like how you used the crotch going down to the legs. That looks great but is also extra challenging to line up the cuts. Well done.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5559 posts in 2557 days


#4 posted 07-04-2018 03:28 AM

Beautiful work.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View MJR's profile

MJR

171 posts in 562 days


#5 posted 07-04-2018 11:03 AM

Awesome table and design! I built a flattening jig out of wood to test the design, It works great so now I will duplicate it in aluminum and steel, It has 4 wheels on each side perpendicular to each other, Check it out on my project page. How is Total Boat to work with? How thick can you pour it at one time? Can you sand it and polish it to bring it back like Stone Coat? Or sand it and clear coat it? I’ve been using Stone Coat casting resin and Stone Coat countertop resin, They work well, I’ve also used Ecopoxy, It’s good but remains somewhat flexible even if you pour it really thick.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

32083 posts in 3015 days


#6 posted 07-04-2018 12:13 PM

This is a beautiful table and the wood is outstanding. Nice work!

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View TimberAndAshDesigns's profile

TimberAndAshDesigns

42 posts in 111 days


#7 posted 07-04-2018 01:40 PM



Very nice. I like how you used the crotch going down to the legs. That looks great but is also extra challenging to line up the cuts. Well done.

- swirt

It was a challenge, especially being this was my first waterfall table. I’m glad I did i this way though.

-- I live on caffeine, sawdust and swear words. https://timberandashdesigns.com/

View TimberAndAshDesigns's profile

TimberAndAshDesigns

42 posts in 111 days


#8 posted 07-04-2018 01:43 PM



Awesome table and design! I built a flattening jig out of wood to test the design, It works great so now I will duplicate it in aluminum and steel, It has 4 wheels on each side perpendicular to each other, Check it out on my project page. How is Total Boat to work with? How thick can you pour it at one time? Can you sand it and polish it to bring it back like Stone Coat? Or sand it and clear coat it? I ve been using Stone Coat casting resin and Stone Coat countertop resin, They work well, I ve also used Ecopoxy, It s good but remains somewhat flexible even if you pour it really thick.

- MJR

Total boat is easy to work with. I like it for fill cracks because it is fairly thin compared to some other resins. Off hand I don’t know what their recommended thickness is but I know it’s less than ecopoxy. It sands and finishes easily as well. I have never used stone coat so I can’t comment on how they compare.

-- I live on caffeine, sawdust and swear words. https://timberandashdesigns.com/

View TimberAndAshDesigns's profile

TimberAndAshDesigns

42 posts in 111 days


#9 posted 07-04-2018 01:43 PM



Beautiful work.

- woodbutcherbynight

Thank you!

-- I live on caffeine, sawdust and swear words. https://timberandashdesigns.com/

View TimberAndAshDesigns's profile

TimberAndAshDesigns

42 posts in 111 days


#10 posted 07-04-2018 01:44 PM



This is a beautiful table and the wood is outstanding. Nice work!

- helluvawreck

Thanks Charles.

-- I live on caffeine, sawdust and swear words. https://timberandashdesigns.com/

View pottz's profile

pottz

3170 posts in 1132 days


#11 posted 09-25-2018 03:34 PM

very nice deign,you did a great job joining the two pieces of that slab together.i love your cart for flattening slabs,great idea.i think your making me rethink metal legs on wood slabs,this one really works well.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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