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Log Mirror frames of red cedar

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Project by ScaryDAve posted 10-14-2010 09:45 PM 3077 views 3 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here are a few framed mirrors I built.

Each is made of red cedar branches from my place here in South West Missouri.

Since I am also into leather tooling I decided to use tooling leather as the transition which seemed to work out fairly well.

The one with 45 angle corners is flat backed with a routed area which the mirror is then held into with hardware. It has a picture hanger on the top for mounting to the wall.

The stretched leather frame has a second piece of leather glued to and covering the back or the mirror and holding it to the front piece which is then laced to the frame.

All of the log frames besides the one holding the etched glass are full round mortise and tenon frames which were no easy task. The tenons pass completely through the mortises and are not cut with a machine. In order to keep the flowing lines of the natural wood, The tenons are hand carved with a draw knife and spoke shave. Many of them are actually curved and the matching mortises had to be compound curved holes carved to match.

Each frame will only go together if each piece is in exactly the right place and then rotated to exactly the right orientation. To make this even more difficult, then channels were marked and cut in order to hold the flat plane of the leather edged mirror.

Other than the etched glass which was a closeout piece that was just too cheap to pass up, all the other mirrors were old pieces I found in thrift stores and were much thicker than the think glass we normally find in stores today. Many had flaws, scratches, wavy spots and so on but I thought that made them look even better so I kept using them.

These were very challenging projects but each time I made a new one I found more effective ways to carve out the pieces and ad the channels.

I made quite a few of these and all were either sold or given away as gifts except for one which was broken in a store and one which ended up on some TV show where they give some family a furnished house.

DAve

-- Failures are successes in training.





8 comments so far

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1535 days


#1 posted 10-14-2010 09:58 PM

coooooooooooool! How do you attach the mirror to the back?

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View knottysticks's profile

knottysticks

266 posts in 1725 days


#2 posted 10-15-2010 03:41 AM

After making working with found and putting together these frames , I’d bet using a table saw and working with right angles will feel like cheating . I really like your work , well done.

-- Everyday above ground is a good day.

View OregonBurls's profile

OregonBurls

578 posts in 1844 days


#3 posted 10-15-2010 04:15 AM

This is a great idea!

-- Greg, Southern Oregon, www.oregonburls.com What can I say but God Is Good!

View TJ65's profile

TJ65

1354 posts in 1746 days


#4 posted 10-15-2010 07:06 AM

They’re great but I am a bit of a traditionalist and so I like the etched glass one.
great idea about getting secondhand mirrors. They do have more character!

-- Theresa, https://sites.google.com/site/tmj65treasure/

View ScaryDAve's profile

ScaryDAve

31 posts in 2249 days


#5 posted 10-15-2010 09:22 PM

Rivergirl, only the traditional frame has glass attached to the back. It is done with traditional tacks/staples at an angle over very thin slices of wood which protects the glass.

The leather stretched one, the glass is sandwiched between two gules together pieces of leather.

All the others are not on the back but in channels cut in the center of each log. Just thick enough to hold the glass. Not an easy task. I eventually built a machine which is still hard to use. I am planning on building a new machine which should do it fairly easily.

knottysticks, I don’t know bout cheating but I just don’t like it. Straight lines and traditional joinery just bore me to tears. I like things which look as though they were grown. I could make a much better profit on the easy to build traditional frame built around the etched glass but so far, I just don’t them very much.

-- Failures are successes in training.

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1535 days


#6 posted 10-15-2010 09:31 PM

Very interesting how you do this. LIke you, I love the natural twists and bends in logs and dislike very much lathed logs in rustic furniture. I find your mirrors are a very honest portrayal of “rustic” I find them to be unique and very beautiful.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View knottysticks's profile

knottysticks

266 posts in 1725 days


#7 posted 10-16-2010 05:37 PM

” but I just don’t like it. Straight lines and traditional joinery just bore me to tears. I like things which look as though they were grown. “

I can’t agree more ! I have been making more traditional canes lately and I’m just not sure the look one gets from lathes + table saws are my thing . I also like the ‘rustic’ , and there is a certain challenege working with what nature provides you and figuring out the different puzzle that each piece of found wood presents , so you are able to use the piece. Keep up the good work .

-- Everyday above ground is a good day.

View Mark A. DeCou's profile

Mark A. DeCou

1996 posts in 3102 days


#8 posted 10-20-2010 11:28 PM

very nice. These are much more complicated to build than most would understand.

-- Mark DeCou - American Contemporary Craft Artisan - www.decoustudio.com

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