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Garden Obelisk

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Project by backyarder1 posted 06-08-2018 05:27 PM 584 views 4 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My husband and I built a couple of these for our garden. We got the instructions from a craft book I checked out of the library. I’d like to create a few more but I can’t find where I put the directions. LOL

-- Betsy, Melbourne, Florida, USA





10 comments so far

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1019 posts in 1662 days


#1 posted 06-08-2018 08:51 PM

That’s pretty cool.
I guess you could use them to grow tomatoes too, huh?

-- There' are two theories to arguin' with a woman. Neither one works.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

671 posts in 600 days


#2 posted 06-08-2018 09:08 PM

Never let it be said You Tube isn't full of how to.

Beyond the basics of how to. Aesthetics are all about what looks good to you.

-- Think safe, be safe

View backyarder1's profile

backyarder1

56 posts in 3793 days


#3 posted 06-08-2018 09:12 PM

Thanks. I’ve seen plenty of plans online but I really like the one I build.

-- Betsy, Melbourne, Florida, USA

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

671 posts in 600 days


#4 posted 06-09-2018 07:13 AM

Fair enough. Years ago a neighbor wanted me to build him a new set of furniture. I was pressed for time, but he had never said NO about any request, so I wanted to help him. I simply disassembled the old one, made exact parts, and reassembled them both. Didn’t need a plan, and it was an exact match, got it done in an afternoon, while listening to a ball game on the radio.

-- Think safe, be safe

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

31393 posts in 2892 days


#5 posted 06-09-2018 01:04 PM

This is a very nice project and looks great in the garden. Congratulations.

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View backyarder1's profile

backyarder1

56 posts in 3793 days


#6 posted 06-09-2018 01:21 PM

Thanks. My husband was a carpenter (and a construction manager) and a gardener. He passed away a few years ago so my OWN skills aren’t as good as his. He could figure out angles in his head and cut them with a circular saw. Its all a little more work for me. LOL

-- Betsy, Melbourne, Florida, USA

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

671 posts in 600 days


#7 posted 06-09-2018 08:15 PM

My Wife told me to get back, and offer more instruction. She says I just say, do this, knowing how, and gets mad at me because she wants a better explanation.

Beofre doing anything get something to mark all the parts. A white #3 pencil is good on lumber, and treated material.

take a picture each time you do something, so you can follow your picture progress in reverse order.

Pick any part, but if it’s a different part it will be easier to identify later. Take it off, take a pic, go counter clockwise because that is more intuitive.

Keep going till everything is apart. It’s probably a good idea to clean, and maybe even sand down all the parts before starting to duplicate. Think splinters, sometimes they pop up just from exposure to the weather. If you have a sander that is fine, if not wrapping a sheet of sandpaper around a little chunk of 2×3, 2×4 makes a good flat for the paper to work off of.

It appears all of the parts are straight, so sawing them up will be next. Do you have just the circular saw, or do you have a table saw (TS)? Chop saw/miter saw? A table saw would cut the pieces to width, if they aren’t found in common widths at the home center nearest you. A miter saw would make the pointed cuts at the tops easier, but if you have a circular saw only, let me know, it’s easily do-able. Just a few precautions about cutting wet wood (treated lumber is usually very wet when new) sawing wet lumber can cause the blade to bind, and you can get kickback. With a TS there is weight, so “usually” the wood kicks, with a circular saw it’s the saw itself that can kick.

Saw this a while back. I’ve never used the KDAT so I’m not sure of ease of access to it, or cost, but it may be something to consider.

“the moisture content of most treated lumber is high–in the 35% to 75% MC range–and the wood is still wet when it arrives at the job site. unless it has been kiln-dried after treatment and marked KDAT. If the wood is stamped KDAT, its moisture content should be about 19% or less.”

For a comparison most of the wood we use for furniture is less than 10% usually 7 or so.

-- Think safe, be safe

View backyarder1's profile

backyarder1

56 posts in 3793 days


#8 posted 06-09-2018 08:30 PM

Thanks, but I’m not going to do that. It would be a heck of a lot easier to just figure out where I put the instruction. I hope I didn’t have them in the set of Woodworking magazines I gave away. The obelisks both have plants growing up them now so it would be very difficult to do what you said. I’d love to find the directions, though, so I could post them in my yard art group. It might get some more men in the group.

-- Betsy, Melbourne, Florida, USA

View firecaster's profile

firecaster

573 posts in 3444 days


#9 posted 06-17-2018 02:56 AM

I’m pretty sure that was in a magazine I have. I made several of that same design. Kept two and sold the rest. You can see on my projects how I changed the top. If I see that magazine I’ll let you know.

-- Father of two sons. Both Eagle Scouts.

View backyarder1's profile

backyarder1

56 posts in 3793 days


#10 posted 06-17-2018 10:44 AM

I agree firecaster. I wish I could find it again. I really liked that plan.

-- Betsy, Melbourne, Florida, USA

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