LumberJocks

What’s the best way to refinish this?

  • Advertise with us
Project by TheBryan posted 05-25-2018 10:38 PM 1258 views 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hello All!
I am looking for some advise here. This chest was built by my great-grandfather around 1930-40 (I believe). My mother would like me to refinish this so the wood isn’t so rough looking but wants to maintain a lot of of the petina.
I would like to hear some thoughts/advice. I don’t want to restore to perfect, I just more so want to preserve the look of it.





6 comments so far

View ChuckV's profile (online now)

ChuckV

3124 posts in 3556 days


#1 posted 05-26-2018 12:00 AM

Here, I describe restoring an old tool chest for our town’s historical society.

In the end, I cleaned all the surfaces with Murphy oil soap and applied Johnson paste wax.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

3577 posts in 2280 days


#2 posted 05-26-2018 12:03 AM

+1 to ChuckV’s suggestion. Either Murphy’s or Bar Keeper’s Friend should do the trick.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View Rich's profile

Rich

3028 posts in 618 days


#3 posted 05-26-2018 01:26 AM

Bar Keeper’s Friend works because it contains oxalic acid. You’d be better off using pure oxalic acid though, since it will be more effective. It won’t bleach the wood, but will help remove the water stains. I’ve used it on some very damaged mesquite boards that sat out in the weather for too long and it works extremely well.

Tom Johnson videos will be invaluable in deciding what approach to take. Here’s one that specifically deals with cleaning water stains from an antique bookcase. You’ll find others that help you as well in his youtube collection.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdDVOl0Xq4g

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

4891 posts in 2437 days


#4 posted 05-26-2018 04:08 AM

That is a good video Rich, thanks for the post. Cannot add anything for what Rich or Tom say in the video. BUT, do notice the Tom has clearly marked the container, and others in view, with what is in the container, or what it is used for. I cannot stress how good of a safety measure this is. We all have done it, used a container quick, then put it down. Come back later and hey what did I use this for last? Some things should never be mixed, even if the fluid has dried the residue can be an issue.

We use some mean chemicals at times, let’s be careful. Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

671 posts in 602 days


#5 posted 05-27-2018 02:22 AM

I would gently clean it with Oil. Walnut oil, Tung, something used on wooden surfaces. At first it will act like a sponge, you can clearly see the exterior is harsh, cracked, dried out. Your first applications just let it soak in. Once the wood starts looking less destroyed gently rub the oil in with a soft cloth.

I have a Walnut tool chest I got at an auction, it was in similar condition, and after about 7 applications of oil it looks great. At that point I did add a few coats of paste wax.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Rich's profile

Rich

3028 posts in 618 days


#6 posted 05-27-2018 07:00 AM


I would gently clean it with Oil. Walnut oil, Tung, something used on wooden surfaces. At first it will act like a sponge, you can clearly see the exterior is harsh, cracked, dried out. Your first applications just let it soak in. Once the wood starts looking less destroyed gently rub the oil in with a soft cloth.

I have a Walnut tool chest I got at an auction, it was in similar condition, and after about 7 applications of oil it looks great. At that point I did add a few coats of paste wax.

- therealSteveN

Please post some photos. I’d love to see what you achieved.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com