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Campfirewood Clamp Rack

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Project by swirt posted 1392 days ago 2050 views 2 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These old piece of wood have been in my campfire wood pile for a few years. Before that, they were part of a log from my neighbor’s yard. The log was in my neighbor’s yard for several years and when you stood near it, you could hear it making noises. Sounded a bit like me after several helpings of 5-alarm chili. It turned out the noise was from very large grubs (about the size of my finger) making tunnels through the wood.

Despite the grubs (which are now long gone) the curve of the wood called out for me to make them into shelf brackets. LOML would not allow grub chewed wood to hold up any shelf in her livingroom, so they became shelf brackets for a much needed clamp rack.

A bit of work with the scrub plane turned them into flat sided slabs. With a little help from my son and his really big backsaw (a 27” Disston 4 that is over 100 years old) we cut out the 5/8” slots for the clamps.

I set it up to sit on a french cleat so that I can move it as I continue to reconfigure my workshop.

It holds pipe clamps, F-clamps, quick clamps and handscrew clamps. Sadly the only thing it doesn’t hold is more clamps ( I know I know… It needed to be longer and I need more clamps.) ;)

More details: clamp rack source

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com





12 comments so far

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1538 days


#1 posted 1392 days ago

I like wood with character. I like what you did! And when, not if, when you get more clamps? Well, you were clever enough to go with the french cleats, so you just add another one!
Strong boy you got there!!

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1286 posts in 1657 days


#2 posted 1392 days ago

Swirt,

I have one of those big old back saws like that. Is that the 28” Millers Falls/Langdon saw that was made by Disston. If so, I have one just like it and it is probably my favorite saw. My favorite part about it is that it is so heavy, all I have to do is to push it back and forth. The weight of the saw does all the work from there.

Cool idea on the shelf brackets. I’m working on a clamp storage solution right now, but I am making one that is mobile.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1713 days


#3 posted 1392 days ago

niice campfire wood when do you light it….lol

that was one big backsaw your son holding
wonder why they have made them so big was it to be used in timber framing or ?

take care
Dennis

View mafe's profile

mafe

9453 posts in 1687 days


#4 posted 1392 days ago

What a wonderful boy, wonderful saw, and a really nice clamp rack too.
Beautiful gloat in that wood.
Tell your helper that he is really cool, and it’s good he can help his father out when it gets to complicated for him…
Spot on my friend.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1570 days


#5 posted 1392 days ago

@Div, that is the beauty of the French cleat ….. Every once in a while I think, “I should have a french cleat around every room in my house”, it would just look like odd molding until I hang something from it … but so easy and flexible. Can’t convince my wife though, so I have to settle for using it in the shop. :(

@Doc, I’m not sure what miter box this saw was paired with. I’m sure it was intended to be used with one, but I have no idea which one. The saw does have a lot of weight, and the length makes it easy to point and keep square. Getting a cut started without the miter box is a little tough due to all the weight, but once it is started it cuts quickly. If you can, post a pic of the miterbox that you have for your saw. I’d enjoy seeing it.

@Dennis the saw is meant to be locked into a large miter box. The length let you take good long strokes to make efficient cuts. The wimpy little short back saws that come with miterboxes now are pretty worthless. Once you figure in the width of the box, you quickly realize that a 10” saw in a 5” box only gives you 5” or less of cutting stroke. Though honestly, I could see using this saw for cutting the tenons on a timber frame. Probably would have worked pretty well, but not as fast as a buck saw, but a bit more accurate, so less planing required.

@Mafe, shhhhh don’t tell him he is helping me … he thinks I am helping him.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1713 days


#6 posted 1392 days ago

that make sence…...that you helped him…..LOL

and thanks for the explanation , I have never seen them that big….its enormus
I don´t think they make them today

Dennis

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1570 days


#7 posted 1392 days ago

Not like that they don’t, but they sort of do in terms of length. It is just that they cut down on metal useage by using a frame more like a hack saw.

http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/nobexchampionmitersaw.aspx

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1713 days


#8 posted 1392 days ago

huu I have one of those (another brand) with a 50 or 60 cm blade in and I don´t like
the way it behave its scream all the time like it was whiped and pay´d to do it

Dennis

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1286 posts in 1657 days


#9 posted 1392 days ago

Swirt, actually, I am like you. I don’t have the miter box for mine either. I found the saw for $10 at a flea market. It didn’t even have any rust on it. I cleaned it a little and found some of the original etch still readable. Mine is a saw that was made for Millers Falls by Disston and then would have been paired with a miter box that was manufactured by the Langdon company. I have not yet found a suitable miter box for it. I understand that it would also work with a Stanley of the same time period, but the problem is finding one that is not almost completely destroyed. I will find one someday, I hope. I could probably bring myself to give up my power miter saw if I had one of those.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1967 posts in 2063 days


#10 posted 1392 days ago

Do my eyes decieve me?!! Someone is willing to give up a power miter saw?! That is hard core woodworking is you’ll give up the MS. Just kidding. Couldn’t help but chime in on that.

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View swirt's profile

swirt

1935 posts in 1570 days


#11 posted 1391 days ago

LOL. A power miter saw could have never made the cuts needed for this little project. I have a 12” Ridgid CMS… I think the last time I used it was to cut laminate flooring for my Son’s room shortly before he was born. He is now 2. the laminate flooring dulled the blade pretty badly and since then I learned how to saw. Now giving up my bandsaw … that would be hardcore. :)

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View PaBull's profile

PaBull

928 posts in 2263 days


#12 posted 1347 days ago

Nice project, Swirt. I like the rustic look of the clamp rack. I have a collection of clamps like that 1 or 2 of every thing.

Be well, Pb.

-- rhykenologist and plant grower

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