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Dovetailed tool tote

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Project by Jeremymcon posted 05-20-2018 01:10 AM 1088 views 2 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I made this dovetailed tool tote from scraps in my shop! Red oak mostly, with an off cut from the walnut rocking chair I finished a whole ago for a handle, and a couple pieces of maple in the bottom.

My dovetail technique still needs some polishing, but I was surprised to find that the angled tails on this piece weren’t really any more difficult than straight ones once I figured out how to lay them out!

The through tenon actually gave me more trouble. Chipped out the outside of the mortise on one side, and unfortunately lost the chip on my shop floor. I could have filled the chip and the gaps in my dovetails with sawdust I guess, but it’s just a tool tote anyway.





11 comments so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

5417 posts in 2469 days


#1 posted 05-20-2018 02:25 AM

Looks plenty fine to me.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1714 posts in 777 days


#2 posted 05-20-2018 04:29 AM

Very nice use of scraps, well done.

Thanks for posting.

-- Think safe, be safe

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

13386 posts in 3070 days


#3 posted 05-20-2018 10:24 AM

Quite interesting design and position of handle.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1076 posts in 3268 days


#4 posted 05-20-2018 10:58 AM

As someone trying to learn how to lay out things like angled dovetails I would love to hear how you did it. Are the bottom boards just nailed and glued?

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

302 posts in 883 days


#5 posted 05-20-2018 01:59 PM

I laid out the tails first, since the tail boards are the ones that have angled ends. I started by drawing two lines on the board itself – one square to the edge, and one parallel, roughly in the middle of the board. I then grabbed some dividers, and starting from the intersection of the lines, marked 5 steps up the parallel line. I also marked one step to either side of the square line. Connect the 5th mark to each one mark with a straight edge, extending the lines the whole way to the end of the board (where the angled cut is).

Those lines are a 1:5 angle (you could us whatever you like – 1:4 through 1:8). Just set a bevel to mark the side angles of the tails. The left side of the tails will be different from the right because of the angled end.

I gang cut the tails so I only had to lay them out twice. Then just lay the tail board on the end of the pin board just like you would normally.

Keep in mind that the angled board needs to be wider than the straight one. I actually cut them both the sane width, and trimmed the straight one down after I made the angled butt joint. There’s probably a better way to figure that out. Lol.

I hope that all makes sense. My method is based on this article, except mine isn’t a compound angle:

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/aw-extra-31314-compound-angle-dovetails-the-layout

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

302 posts in 883 days


#6 posted 05-20-2018 02:02 PM

Oh! And the bottom is just shiplap nailed on. I used cut nails because I had them, and they’re supposed to hold better.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117337 posts in 3780 days


#7 posted 05-20-2018 02:44 PM

I like it a very nice build.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

408 posts in 1313 days


#8 posted 05-21-2018 12:06 AM

Superb that

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

302 posts in 883 days


#9 posted 05-21-2018 12:13 AM

Thanks everyone! It was a ton of fun. I think I might enjoy these little projects from scraps almost more than making furniture.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

21740 posts in 3308 days


#10 posted 05-21-2018 02:11 AM

Very nice tote and great detail on the joints!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1076 posts in 3268 days


#11 posted 05-21-2018 09:15 AM



I laid out the tails first, since the tail boards are the ones that have angled ends. I started by drawing two lines on the board itself – one square to the edge, and one parallel, roughly in the middle of the board. I then grabbed some dividers, and starting from the intersection of the lines, marked 5 steps up the parallel line. I also marked one step to either side of the square line. Connect the 5th mark to each one mark with a straight edge, extending the lines the whole way to the end of the board (where the angled cut is).

Those lines are a 1:5 angle (you could us whatever you like – 1:4 through 1:8). Just set a bevel to mark the side angles of the tails. The left side of the tails will be different from the right because of the angled end.

I gang cut the tails so I only had to lay them out twice. Then just lay the tail board on the end of the pin board just like you would normally.

Keep in mind that the angled board needs to be wider than the straight one. I actually cut them both the sane width, and trimmed the straight one down after I made the angled butt joint. There s probably a better way to figure that out. Lol.

I hope that all makes sense. My method is based on this article, except mine isn t a compound angle:

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/aw-extra-31314-compound-angle-dovetails-the-layout

- Jeremymcon


Thank you so much for this, I went to the article as well the pictures cleared it right up for me. It looks like they used 1:7 for their layout

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

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