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Knife handles

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Project by bugradx2 posted 05-17-2018 04:09 PM 670 views 1 time favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’ve put handles on a few knives this year, as someone with a lot of outdoorsmen in the family they are gifts that are always welcome by the recipient!

First photo is a pair of fillet knives that came from Woodcraft, I like these because they give you a decent sheath as part of the kit. The knives came out of the package fairly sharp, I touched them up a little bit and they were ready to go. We spent 7 days in Canada fishing and they got used twice a day for meals for 8 of us and only had to be resharpened once. The top handle is made from Leopardwood finished with tung oil, the lower handle is zebrawood finished with boiled linseed oil. Each knife has several (6-8?) coats of TruOil over the top of the finish to harden it up.

The second photo is another set of the fillet knives with Beli scales. I really liked using the Beli because it shaped really easily! I can’t remember if I put some tung oil or linseed oil on these before I put the finish coat on them or not.

The third photo is a matched set I made for a very dear friend. They’re a set cut from the same piece of Leopardwood. I have a mosaic pin in the center of each. The sheaths are wet formed to fit each knife. Both have a finish coat (6-9) of TruOil to seal and harden the wood.

I did a lot of research into finishes for knives and went with TruOil because it’s what is used for gun stocks and they go through rain, muck and everything else without much protest. These knives are meant to get wet and used so that appealed to me. The first set of fillet knives have been used a lot and you can’t tell they’ve been used.

These have been fun projects and are something that you can kick out in a weekend or in the evenings after the kids go to bed because I don’t have to run the “loud” tools.

-- The only thing not measured in my shop is time





12 comments so far

View Rick S.'s profile

Rick S.

10571 posts in 3179 days


#1 posted 05-17-2018 05:57 PM

Very Nice & Well Done!

-- (Rick S.)... "Don't Worry About What People Think! They Don't Do It Very Often Anyway!"

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

32083 posts in 3013 days


#2 posted 05-17-2018 08:17 PM

You have done a beautiful job on these handles.

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4728 posts in 858 days


#3 posted 05-18-2018 12:30 AM

great choices for the wood ….GREAT JOB :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View ralbuck's profile (online now)

ralbuck

5119 posts in 2412 days


#4 posted 05-18-2018 01:05 AM

All look great!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1410 posts in 720 days


#5 posted 05-18-2018 04:19 AM

Very nice looking. sounds like good steel to go with only one sharpening in a week, or ya didn’t catch many fish :-)

Do you find the True oil finish slippery when they get a little wet?

Nice work, and thanks for posting.

-- Think safe, be safe

View bugradx2's profile

bugradx2

29 posts in 165 days


#6 posted 05-19-2018 04:11 AM


Very nice looking. sounds like good steel to go with only one sharpening in a week, or ya didn t catch many fish :-)

Do you find the True oil finish slippery when they get a little wet?

Nice work, and thanks for posting.

- therealSteveN

We caught more than enough walleye to feed the 8 of us! (my two brothers, me and the kids) One of my brothers did most of the fillet work with his new knife while the other two of us were cooking and washing fillets. Truth be told, I was surprised how well the edge held up. I did some research on the knives before purchasing and was very happy with it.

I actually went with the TruOil because it’s a gun stock finish and wouldn’t rub off with fish slime and anything else. I never felt like it got slippery. I would very lightly hit the handles with 400 grit sand paper between coats and wipe off the dust. It’s kind of funny, now that I’ve done a few, I can tell when the finish goes from “not quite” to “done” and you can actually tell a difference when you hit that point. Just make sure you use some painters tape to cover the blade and guard because it can be a pain to get the Tru Oil off if it gets there accidently.

-- The only thing not measured in my shop is time

View mel52's profile

mel52

551 posts in 411 days


#7 posted 05-19-2018 05:06 AM

Handles flow with the blades nicely. Great job !!!

-- MEL, Kansas

View FloridaArt's profile

FloridaArt

860 posts in 3444 days


#8 posted 05-20-2018 11:08 AM

Great looking handles. I agree with a previous comment: Nice choice in woods.

-- Art | Bradenton, Florida

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1410 posts in 720 days


#9 posted 05-20-2018 10:14 PM

The reason I asked about the Tru Oli getting slippery is because the scales on the knives appear to be smooth. I used to do a lot of duck hunting, even on dry days it was always wet, and it never clicked to me until one of the guys that went with us had remade a Model 12 his Dad had given to him. It had suffered a blow which broke the fore-end. He had made a new one, and unlike most made in factories it was NOT checkered.

It was a blustery day, and we had a bunch of Mallards come in, he only shot once. I was right next to him and knew he only fired once, all the rest us had unloaded, it had been a great flight. I asked why he didn’t shoot more than once. He was looking at his gun, and just said he couldn’t keep his hand from slipping off the forearm. He had a Tru Oil finish, from that time on I just figured un-checkered tru oil parts would be slippery. I know most stocks are, that is by design so they don’t hang up when you bring a gun up.

Can’t say I have heard of many people using it except on guns, figured I would ask.

-- Think safe, be safe

View bugradx2's profile

bugradx2

29 posts in 165 days


#10 posted 05-21-2018 04:17 AM


The reason I asked about the Tru Oli getting slippery is because the scales on the knives appear to be smooth. I used to do a lot of duck hunting, even on dry days it was always wet, and it never clicked to me until one of the guys that went with us had remade a Model 12 his Dad had given to him. It had suffered a blow which broke the fore-end. He had made a new one, and unlike most made in factories it was NOT checkered.

It was a blustery day, and we had a bunch of Mallards come in, he only shot once. I was right next to him and knew he only fired once, all the rest us had unloaded, it had been a great flight. I asked why he didn t shoot more than once. He was looking at his gun, and just said he couldn t keep his hand from slipping off the forearm. He had a Tru Oil finish, from that time on I just figured un-checkered tru oil parts would be slippery. I know most stocks are, that is by design so they don t hang up when you bring a gun up.

Can t say I have heard of many people using it except on guns, figured I would ask.

- therealSteveN

Wow, as a waterfowler myself i can say that would really suck! I dont know what to say for sure on what happened with his stock. It’s funny you talk about someone redoing a stock though. I wore the finish off my Remington in an ice storm as a teen (let’s say I’m well past that now…) and refinished my stock. I still look at it and wish I’d done a little better job.

I will say you’ve got to make sure you shake the bottle EVERY time you use it because whatever additives are in there will settle out. Maybe that’s what happened to your buddy?

-- The only thing not measured in my shop is time

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1410 posts in 720 days


#11 posted 05-21-2018 07:17 PM

Not sure about his finishing process on that gun, but if I have either bluing, or stock work, and refinish with Tru Oil he get’s the job, he’s done at home Gunsmithing for a lot of years now.

Maybe I didn’t clarify initially but his Model 12 got semi crushed, and the fore arm was reduced to splinters, so when he redid it, he made a new one for it, he just hadn’t checkered it. I have a couple of Model 12’s also from My Dad, and both of mine have what looks like wooden rings instead of your standard checkering pattern. When he went out he was excited to be using the gun again, and took it as is. He said his plan was to do something with the fore arm, but din’t decide on the rings, or checkering yet, so it was smooth, and fairly oversized, but he had put on the Tru.

-- Think safe, be safe

View bugradx2's profile

bugradx2

29 posts in 165 days


#12 posted 05-21-2018 08:03 PM



Not sure about his finishing process on that gun, but if I have either bluing, or stock work, and refinish with Tru Oil he get s the job, he s done at home Gunsmithing for a lot of years now.

Maybe I didn t clarify initially but his Model 12 got semi crushed, and the fore arm was reduced to splinters, so when he redid it, he made a new one for it, he just hadn t checkered it. I have a couple of Model 12 s also from My Dad, and both of mine have what looks like wooden rings instead of your standard checkering pattern. When he went out he was excited to be using the gun again, and took it as is. He said his plan was to do something with the fore arm, but din t decide on the rings, or checkering yet, so it was smooth, and fairly oversized, but he had put on the Tru.

- therealSteveN

Gotcha, sounds like the guy you need to have around!

-- The only thing not measured in my shop is time

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