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Black Ash Platter

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Project by TheDane posted 05-12-2018 12:50 AM 761 views 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Black Ash Platter
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This platter, turned from a slab of Black Ash, is about 14” long and 8” wide. The bowl is about 6” in diameter.

This was a challenging piece to turn … the slab was only a little over an inch thick, and I had to juxtaposition the bowl and foot around the two piths (that’s why the bowl is so far off-center). The finished thickness of the bark on the natural edge is just under 1/2-inch.

Gave it 2 coats of boiled linseed oil, let it dry for a week, then top-coated with matte acrylic.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"





13 comments so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

5004 posts in 2386 days


#1 posted 05-12-2018 01:54 AM

It looks gorgeous; just waiting for the chips and dip!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

21113 posts in 3225 days


#2 posted 05-12-2018 02:30 AM

Nice work. I like it!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10240 posts in 4171 days


#3 posted 05-12-2018 03:12 AM

I can’t imagine how you ‘turned’ that oblong platter…

I guess you’ll tell us how you did it?

Sounds like a VERY SCARY process…

Beautiful results!!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3066 posts in 2288 days


#4 posted 05-12-2018 08:07 AM

A challenging piece of work.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

32073 posts in 2986 days


#5 posted 05-12-2018 01:21 PM

This is a very nice platter and the wood is beautiful. Nicely done!

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5516 posts in 3782 days


#6 posted 05-12-2018 01:34 PM

I can t imagine how you turned that oblong platter…

I guess you ll tell us how you did it?

Sounds like a VERY SCARY process…

Beautiful results!!

- Joe Lyddon

Think of an airplane propeller with the tip of one blade broken off! Black Ash is hard enough to begin with and this stuff had been drying in a barn for about 10 years. To get a reasonably clean cut, I had to crank up the speed, which made my lathe (a PM3520C that weighs 850 lbs) dance.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View mafe's profile

mafe

11741 posts in 3208 days


#7 posted 05-12-2018 05:01 PM

That’s really a beauty, I love the mix between fine and rough.
How did you attach it to the lathe?
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5516 posts in 3782 days


#8 posted 05-12-2018 09:48 PM

How did you attach it to the lathe?

Flattened both sides on the drum sander, then used a glue block on what would become the top while I shaped the bottom. Cut a shallow recess in the bottom, then turned it around and mounted on my Nova Titan chuck to turn the top and bowl.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View mafe's profile

mafe

11741 posts in 3208 days


#9 posted 05-12-2018 11:32 PM

Thank you.
Clever, thinking, this glue block, do you cut that off on with saw, or simply use the gauge to cut it away.
Always wonderful to learn new.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5516 posts in 3782 days


#10 posted 05-13-2018 12:49 AM

... do you cut that off on with saw, or simply use the gauge to cut it away.

I used a saw with the spindle locked … not enough clearance to use a gouge or parting tool. Too dangerous to get hands close enough to use a cutting tool.

I use glue blocks a lot. I screw a thick block of hard maple to a faceplate and flatten it. When I part the piece off, I re-flatten the glue block and re-use. When I get too close to the screws, I flatten it again and glue another waste block on. I have several 3-1/2” faceplates … each has a glue block screwed to it and a couple of them usually have a project attached. Reduces the use of chucks, and never have a problem getting a piece to run true when I re-mount it on the lathe.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View mafe's profile

mafe

11741 posts in 3208 days


#11 posted 05-13-2018 06:48 PM

Amazing, I always think the glue will fail. ;-D
But when we glue wood on a flat surface it is never the glue that fails, so one should feel safe.
Thank you for clearing it out for me, I fully get the picture now.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5516 posts in 3782 days


#12 posted 05-13-2018 07:00 PM

Amazing, I always think the glue will fail. ;-D

I once thought that myself, but if the mating surfaces are flat and allowed to properly cure, the joint you get with PVA glue (I use Titebond Original) seems stronger than the wood! Some use CA glue, but I don’t trust it … too brittle and not enough shear strength.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View mafe's profile

mafe

11741 posts in 3208 days


#13 posted 05-13-2018 08:56 PM

I did some test gluing years back in my basement workshop and when using PVA (we call it white carpenters glue), it never failed in the joint, always in the wood, so I have learned to trust this also. ;-)
For the CA, I am more afraid that it will fail in time, it quite important that the layer are ultra thin to get full strength.
Smiles thanks.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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