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Shoe Rack

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Project by Will Stokes posted 09-24-2010 09:26 PM 6849 views 21 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Was out shopping with the LOML the other day when she spotted a rather disappointing shoe rack. I suggested I could easily make one much better. With a week till her birthday I pounded this project out, a few hours each night. My Dad helped me complete it including sanding, attaching the slats, and putting in the plugs. The legs and aprons are cherry while the slats are black walnut. I have no clue what the plugs are, some piece of exotic scrap I cut plugs from. I got the scrap from another LJ at a picnic earlier this summer. Three coats of T&T varnish oil followed up by three coats of wipe-on poly and she’s finally all done. Not as many new things for me on this project aside from using metal (to attach the slats) and finally took a stab at real thru tenons and real pins using my new mortiser. Still need some practice but getting there.





18 comments so far

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2432 posts in 1793 days


#1 posted 09-24-2010 09:27 PM

Nice Shoe Rack, Can’t wait for the Mud !!! :)

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

View Will Stokes's profile

Will Stokes

264 posts in 2107 days


#2 posted 09-24-2010 09:38 PM

Muddy boots and such go on a rubber mat. This is mainly intended for semi-clean and dry foot apparel. :-)

View SurfWood's profile

SurfWood

9 posts in 1856 days


#3 posted 09-24-2010 09:42 PM

Nice shoe rack. I need to make one for our closet but it needs about 8 shelves to hold all of our shoes! I haven’t tried making plugs yet, i’ll have to give that a try. The thru tenons turned out pretty good!

-- Justin from Seattle, WA

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1803 days


#4 posted 09-24-2010 11:49 PM

Will, really nice job, especially on such a utilitarian item!

It’s got to be 10x nicer than whatever you saw at the store.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Skylark53's profile

Skylark53

2565 posts in 1813 days


#5 posted 09-25-2010 02:21 AM

That’s a great project and will be well used and appreciated, I’ll bet. Good work!

-- Rick, Tennessee, John 3:16

View MickeyD's profile

MickeyD

130 posts in 2279 days


#6 posted 09-25-2010 05:48 AM

Very nice looking shoe rack. Makes an area that can look messy look classy!

-- -Willing to try

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2999 days


#7 posted 09-25-2010 12:03 PM

Great job, even gives them a chance to air out, LOL.

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2691 posts in 1829 days


#8 posted 09-25-2010 02:39 PM

Very cool!

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

15337 posts in 1941 days


#9 posted 09-25-2010 07:01 PM

I have no doubt this is 100% better than the store bought one. Great work.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Jethro80's profile

Jethro80

33 posts in 1096 days


#10 posted 01-05-2012 02:31 AM

Nice job on the rack! I’ve got a rack built for shoes but it’s in need of expansion and improvement. I’m really interested in learning to cut tenons and mortises. I’m a necomer to jointery, how would you suggest I learn how to cut these?

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1803 days


#11 posted 01-05-2012 03:08 AM

Jethro80, there are numerous ways to go about making mortise and tenon joints. It depends on the tools you have, or conversely, might not have.

Just a few ways to cut tenons are:
1. with a handsaw
2. with a bandsaw
3. with a table saw
4. M&T jig of one sort or another (for instance, a router setup)

Just a few ways to make mortises are:
1. drill press or hand drill to drill the holes, then square up the corners with a chisel
2. a mortising machine, which you probably don’t need unless you plan on using M&T joints a lot
3. M&T jig of one sort or another (for instance, a router setup)

You didn’t post anything under your workshop, so I’m not sure what tools you have access to?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112936 posts in 2330 days


#12 posted 01-05-2012 04:11 AM

Wow that’s one fancy shoe rack. good job.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Will Stokes's profile

Will Stokes

264 posts in 2107 days


#13 posted 01-05-2012 04:18 AM

Indeed there are many ways to do M&T joints. I don’t even have a bandsaw at the moment myself. If you’re tools are limted I suggest using a forsterner bit to hog out most of the mortise, then use a sharp chisel to square it up. The tenon can be fashioned using a radial arm saw or a table saw. I personally prefer to make my tenons on the table saw with a sled. I used to just make a lot of pases with a standard blade, then slide the piece from side-to-side while over the blade to clean it up. It’s not perfect and takes a while but it does work. I’ve more recently acquired a dado set. The procedure is similar, just a lot faster and you end up with a much smoother cheek on your tenon. You might also experiment with hogging out the majority of the waste of the tenon with a band saw, then use a router table to clean it up. That will result in a very smooth tenon but you’ll want to use a backer board when using the router.

View Jethro80's profile

Jethro80

33 posts in 1096 days


#14 posted 01-05-2012 04:55 AM

Thanks for the insight guys! Unfortunately I have very minimal tools in my shop including jig saw, scroll saw, crosscut handsaw, dovetail razor handsaw, dremel tool, jack plane, circular saw, router.

I think my next purchase should be a table saw….any thoughts?

View Will Stokes's profile

Will Stokes

264 posts in 2107 days


#15 posted 01-05-2012 04:56 AM

Yeah a table saw is really useful. Ripping, cross cutting, etc. After that you might consider a thickness planer. :-)

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