LumberJocks

Refurbished trash can chisel, my 2nd lathe project

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Project by Mainiac Matt posted 04-20-2018 06:47 PM 2353 views 1 time favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

*disclaimer: I like to use my projects page as a type of photo album and shop journal of what I’ve been up to. This little project is not intended to be an entry into any type of competition. Please excuse it if it is un-project worthy.

Back when I built my timber frame house I developed a preference for old socket chisels and always have my eyes peeled for them. I found this one covered in rust and paint, as it had been relegated to that most humble un-chisel worthy task…. prying open paint cans. Cost to me $0

The old timers would hammer weld a thin high carbon hard steel strip onto a tough low carbon body, giving the best of both worlds… takes and holds an edge AND you can beat on it :^o

After a long bath in Evaporust, I took this one into work to flatten the back on the surface grinder, as it was going to take a lifetime to do so on bench stones and I wanted to get some experience with the metal working equipment. After getting the back dead flat, I polished it up on the Work Sharp.

Unfortunately, I was so excited about how well the back came out, that I made the mistake of trying to make it pretty and took it back to clean up the top side. And of course being impatient, I failed to mount it level and then ground the passes way too heavy, resulting in that bumpy finish. I realized that I had taken off way to much material and had pretty much ruined the chisel, but figured that it would still be useful for pairing work.

I’m setting up my bench top metal working lathe for dual use for woodworking (don’t have enough space for both, and a metal lathe can do woodworking a lot better than a wood lathe can do metal working) and this is my second experimental project and first time using the woodworm screw in the new Nova chuck.

I grabbed a scrap of what I believe is Cherry and got busy… primarily using a hand ground M2 high speed steel cutter and a parting tool. After carefully measuring the angle of the socket cone, I set the compound on the lathe to match and wound up pretty darn close.

I’m sure you’ll see the deep scratch marks, which are evidence of my next screw up… which was using a ripped sheet of 80 grit belt sander paper to shape the curves. After sanding for quite a while, with 150 and 220, I thought I had the scratches out, but as soon as I hit it with the oil, POP there they were.

I attempted to flatten the top and bottom with a smoothing plane, but the handle kept slipping in the vice, so I mounted my hand held belt sander in the vise and used it to flatten the faces. I normally regret it whenever I break out that pig, but managed not to trash the handles and managed to match the two faces pretty well.

I coated the inside of the socket with die chem and the tapped in the handle, popped it back out and releaved the marked surfaces on the belt sander. As I got close to the final fit, I decided to give it a whack to see if I could seat the step I had turned into the handle against the socket. Well that marked the completion of the project. The socket didn’t seat on the lip, but I can’t get it back out to save my life… so I called it done and slapped a quick coat of Cherry tinted Danish oil on it.

Conclusion… turning is fun. Next up is handles for the kitchen tools I got my wife for Christmas.

Addendum…

I picked up some carbide replacement inserts for the Woodpecker carbide lathe tools on line . These only set me back about $12 each and they have a wicked sharp beautiful edge ground on them. But I had to custom fabricate mounts for them. I took the mild steel shanks from some old brazed carbide metal working bits that I had chipped while turning hardened steel (which I don’t recommend), and with the help of our semi-retired machinist at work, made these on the Bridgeport. You can see the round profile one mounted in a quick change tool holder. Also seen is a square profile brazed carbide bit that I hand honed on a DMT diamond plate. These cheapo China bits have a terrible finish, but I was able to get a somewhat decent edge on it and will give it a whirl.

Thanks for looking.

-- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam





14 comments so far

View Joe's profile

Joe

482 posts in 1206 days


#1 posted 04-20-2018 07:09 PM

I sure hope Lumberjocks “is not” a competition, if it is I lost a longtime a go. I look at great woodworkers projects and feel inspired. I take what I can and incorporate that into my humble projects. I learn so much from People like yourself and enjoy every minute. Thanks for taking the time to explain how and why you built your project, it means a great deal to those of us not so talented. Thanks for inspiring

-- CurleyJoe, "You only learn from your mistakes"

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2743 posts in 1768 days


#2 posted 04-20-2018 10:03 PM


I sure hope Lumberjocks “is not” a competition, if it is I lost a longtime a go. I look at great woodworkers projects and feel inspired. I take what I can and incorporate that into my humble projects. I learn so much from People like yourself and enjoy every minute. Thanks for taking the time to explain how and why you built your project, it means a great deal to those of us not so talented. Thanks for inspiring

- Joe

I couldn’t have said it better, this is a worthy project Matt, and I really enjoyed reading about your process.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View bubbaw's profile

bubbaw

70 posts in 1765 days


#3 posted 04-20-2018 10:29 PM

I just enjoyed the story. I’m with you on the old mistreat
ed stuff. keep on keeping on. Now that is a priceless chisel. I have a few old tools I have rescued from the junk bin. Love them.

-- Isaiah 40:31

View NotaJock's profile

NotaJock

150 posts in 1219 days


#4 posted 04-21-2018 01:00 AM

Old chisels are the best, especially considering the cost. So many young kids are selling their Gdad’s tools at the swapmeet because they don’t know what to do with them. I’ve a pretty complete set of regular woodworking and spindle turning chisels, most I paid $1 for just because they had a little rust, a cracked handle or had been used to cut concrete. Not having access to a surface grinder, see me envious, I settle for 80 and 120 grit sandpaper on the faces and call it good enough knowing it will polish out in time. If your handle had seated against the shoulder it wouldn’t be as tight as it is now. You did it just right.

-- Mike in SoCal

View rtbrmb's profile

rtbrmb

652 posts in 2508 days


#5 posted 04-21-2018 01:12 AM

Great write up- my everyday users are old turn of the century e-bay purchases that I tuned up on the worksharp.

I have another group that need handles & just bought a Harbor Freight lathe. Did you put anything on the handle to get it to stay in the socket-or is it a press fit?

Do you have any before pics?

Thanks for sharing.

Bill in MI

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5545 posts in 2529 days


#6 posted 04-21-2018 01:16 AM

Nice work, despite the hurdles you encountered. Even the ones you made yourself. Cause we all have been there and done that.

LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View lightcs1776's profile

lightcs1776

4228 posts in 1774 days


#7 posted 04-21-2018 01:20 AM

You did a nice job on the restoration. No competition from me. I simply enjoy seeing what you are up to in the shop.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

3184 posts in 2402 days


#8 posted 04-21-2018 01:50 AM

Better than new. Metal lathe to cut wood is the best, one can do things one would only dream of quickly. I made a handle for a tack hammer that dates back to 1968, on the lathe. instead of round, the piece was wider than think so I left the sides with a flat area. Took minutes on automatic feed while changing the shape with the cross slide.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

10400 posts in 1959 days


#9 posted 04-21-2018 06:21 AM

You are too hard on yourself, Matt. The textured face makes me think of Damascus steel. Great save!

-- God bless, Candy

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

8351 posts in 2448 days


#10 posted 04-21-2018 10:23 AM


Do you have any before pics?
Bill in MI
- rtbrmb

If I do, I don’t know where…
What I didn’t divulge is that I started this project about 6 years ago and after I ground it so thin I shelved it in disgust. I only picked it up again because I was looking for a quickie project to practice on the lathe.

Where abouts in MI Bill?

I grew up in Jackson and went to Moo U

-- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

View wrenchhead's profile

wrenchhead

217 posts in 3284 days


#11 posted 04-21-2018 02:07 PM

I like the handle shape. Im sure that chisel would get lots of use in my shop!!

-- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkRuFxW8HhRfyhbTP4SY5UA I could quit if I wanted

View rtbrmb's profile

rtbrmb

652 posts in 2508 days


#12 posted 04-21-2018 04:25 PM

6 years-glad to hear I’m not the only one to shelf projects for an extended amount of time.

I live in Holt and also went to MSU (Civil Engineering)-I grew up on the north side of the state.

Bill

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

3656 posts in 1397 days


#13 posted 04-23-2018 07:28 PM

It is not supposed to seat against the shoulder. A 0.1 inch gap is good. The wood will dry and you will seat it deeper. So if it became tight now and against the shoulder, then it’ll be loose later. See WHY SOCKETED CHISELS TURN LOOSE for a good disccussion.e.

So it looks all good to me.

P.S. Seems we are all in Michigan.

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

8351 posts in 2448 days


#14 posted 04-23-2018 11:02 PM

I’m a Michigan boy, born and raised, but the navy took me far away and deposited me in Maine.

And since I met a pretty girl here, I stayed ;^)

-- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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