LumberJocks

The box for containing all the rattles and toys for grand baby

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Project by KimAccurso posted 04-14-2018 09:58 PM 4948 views 1 time favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

So the rattles and toys were a hit at the baby shower today – as was this box. My heart just swells giving this all to my step-daughter.

I finished up the box, it is my first finished dovetailed box so a little extra special for me to complete successfully! I admit, I didn’t cut the dovetails by hand. I was lucky enough to purchase a 2003 Leigh 24” jig from my good friend TomGrin's father. Which also contains the mortise and tenon jig I have yet to explore!

The lid has a special carving in it thanks to Matthew Matthew, your carving is BEAUTIFUL. I tried to duplicate but nothing like yours! I rough-cut it with the bandsaw and finished it with a dremel, files, and more than a few sheets of sandpaper. I pre-finished the carving and doweled and glued it to the lid, which I laminated up with walnut and hard maple. The lid piece is rabbeted in to the lid frame – I did that on my cheesy Skil router table and can’t believe I got it darn near perfect.

Advise needed: I have had a problem in the past cutting open boxes on my table saw. The cut ends up not perfect at the corners and I’m not sure why. If anyone has experience and advise for that issue, I would love to hear. This box, however, cut perfectly!! I couldn’t believe it and was SO grateful to my beloved table saw this time because I had no time to fix imperfect alignment :)

I also made the hinges with many inspirations from many Lumberjocks. I love making hinges! I used a box joint jig I think I also found here (but cannot find again) for my router table with a 3/8” bit. The hinges are inlayed in to the box – I routed out the box maybe 1/4” to set them in and then used maple dowels to help secure them. There is a 1/4” steel rod within the hinge.

Within the box I used walnut to support the upper tray, which is also dovetailed. I made a little cherry piece to set the two rattles on, used a forester bit to make the rounded support. It is removable in case she wants to use the box for something else someday. I used gray canvas as a liner because gray is her favorite color, and it goes with the nursery.

This box fought me because a) I was in a bit of a time crunch, b)first time trying to perfect the dovetails (thank you Leigh jig for making it do-able for the non-pro woodworker (ha!) and c)I only ‘sort-of’ had a plan but the proportions of the box were based on the size of the rattles. It’s no fibonochi (or however you spell that) but it works. I think it ended up pretty good for a little treasure chest.

It’s all finished with several coats of wipe on Satin poly, sanded with 1000 grit in-between coats and then a coat of paste wax. Rubbed out silky smooth!

It’s no matter how much I like it, it’s how much my step-daughter and her hubby like it that matters :)
Thanks for looking and for all the inspiration!

-- Kim - imperfection is the pursuit of perfection





12 comments so far

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

254 posts in 736 days


#1 posted 04-15-2018 04:13 AM

Very nice.
Very special.
Good job!

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View Steve_In_MN's profile

Steve_In_MN

28 posts in 143 days


#2 posted 04-15-2018 04:18 AM

This is beautiful with excellent details! Great job!

I’m confident any parent would be thrilled to receive this for their baby.

-- Steve, Minneapolis area

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

2715 posts in 2354 days


#3 posted 04-15-2018 06:01 AM

Kim, what a sweet project. I like the carving, the internal tray, the crafted rattles, the choice of materials, the finish, the over-all design, and the obvious love that went into making this. Good work. You have mastered all the essential elements of boxmaking. Keep boxing and keep posting.

You asked about suggestion for cutting the lid from the bottom. This is an illustrated blog on separating the top from the bottom. A few basics: Use a sharp blade, keep a scrap of the side wood from the box, use the scrap to set the blade height of your saw, always cut with the top away from the fence, cut the long sides just through the wood, cut the ends not quiet through the wood,

If you are making lots of boxes, a drum sander is a must for having a perfect fit on the top and bottom of the box.

I hope this is not more information than you want, but these are some tutorials on various things about box making. They are arranged by topic. There are some you may want to look at and others you may want to skip.

$5 band clamps:
Finishing tips:
Cutting off the box top and sizing piano hinges
Adding finger indents:
More about finger indents.
Making a jig to cut spline slots:
Adding splines to a box:
Measuring for spline slot cuts:
Making splines with a simple jig:
Jig for 45ing corners:
Combining Wood Colors:
Sizing Tea Boxes and Dividers From Venetian Blinds
Making Kleenex boxes:
Making music boxes
Routers and Rounding edges
Why round box corners?
Organizing a glue-up table:
Installing an attached top: like that pictured above.
Mortising and installing hinges:
Tips on making sliding trays: for inside boxes:
Cutting cloth liners for trays and the bottom of boxes.
Swapping Wood By Mail:
Making a serving tray with angled sides.
Roy Underhill's tool tote.
Teaching Boxmaking

-- Big Al in IN

View AJ1104's profile

AJ1104

517 posts in 1745 days


#4 posted 04-15-2018 11:56 AM

Great job on this ‘treasure chest’. I love the box layout and finish. I also saw your post on how you built the rattles too. It all looks fabulous. Congrats!

-- AJ

View TomGrin's profile

TomGrin

41 posts in 221 days


#5 posted 04-15-2018 12:24 PM

Another great looking box! The dovetails look awesome. I like that they aren’t all the same size. I knew you would do wonderful things with that jig.

-- Lets make some sawdust. Tom

View Woodbie's profile

Woodbie

20 posts in 139 days


#6 posted 04-15-2018 05:21 PM

Awesome work, very good design. Thank you for this helpful blog.

-- look here : https://woodyworking.wixsite.com/woody

View KimAccurso's profile

KimAccurso

177 posts in 226 days


#7 posted 04-16-2018 11:48 AM

Hi All, thank you so much for the compliments and Big Al, thank you for all the links. Your blogs are extremely helpful and I have already started digging in reading each. I always wondered how you did your finger lifts – I think on the next box I post I’ll be attempting your method!

-- Kim - imperfection is the pursuit of perfection

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4883 posts in 2599 days


#8 posted 04-18-2018 03:47 PM

What a great piece Kim.

You did the hinges right, that’s the same way I make my hinges, I like the inlay touch you did as well.

As far as cutting your lid, I never thought about doing it the way Alan does it but with my box designs I have no choice but to put the lid to the fence because my boxes are of a hybrid style and the bottoms aren’t always even, I have to put feet on the bottoms of my boxes to even it up.

How far out of wack are your cuts at the corners? Mine are never perfect either so what I do to resolve that is by not cutting all the way through the box when cutting the lid, but as Alan also mentioned make sure you have a sharp fine tooth blade. I use a finish blade which has more teeth. Once my cut is done, I use a sharp hand saw (dove tail) saw to finish cutting the lid all the way through. To even out the miss-matched cuts at the corners I sand both the lid and the box on a 17” wide sanding belt that I purchased and cut in half at 23” so the sanding board is 17” x 23” to fit a flat board, it’s held down on a 3/4” maple ply board piece that I purchased from the project bend at Homedepot. This will smooth and square up your mismatched corners and the lid will fit perfectly snug.

Here is a picture of the sanding board I made. The belt is 100 grit. You just turn your lid upside down and run it back and forth across the sanding table by hands until it’s even and you do the same with the box. Trial fitting until you have a prefect fit. I clamp the sanding table to my workbench to keep it from moving.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4364 posts in 799 days


#9 posted 04-18-2018 07:05 PM

overall you did a very good job on this fine looking case good memories …GREAT JOB :<)) GRATZ TOP 3

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View KimAccurso's profile

KimAccurso

177 posts in 226 days


#10 posted 04-18-2018 10:55 PM



What a great piece Kim.

You did the hinges right, that s the same way I make my hinges, I like the inlay touch you did as well.

As far as cutting your lid, I never thought about doing it the way Alan does it but with my box designs I have no choice but to put the lid to the fence because my boxes are of a hybrid style and the bottoms aren t always even, I have to put feet on the bottoms of my boxes to even it up.

How far out of wack are your cuts at the corners? Mine are never perfect either so what I do to resolve that is by not cutting all the way through the box when cutting the lid, but as Alan also mentioned make sure you have a sharp fine tooth blade. I use a finish blade which has more teeth. Once my cut is done, I use a sharp hand saw (dove tail) saw to finish cutting the lid all the way through. To even out the miss-matched cuts at the corners I sand both the lid and the box on a 17” wide sanding belt that I purchased and cut in half at 23” so the sanding board is 17” x 23” to fit a flat board, it s held down on a 3/4” maple ply board piece that I purchased from the project bend at Homedepot. This will smooth and square up your mismatched corners and the lid will fit perfectly snug.

Here is a picture of the sanding board I made. The belt is 100 grit. You just turn your lid upside down and run it back and forth across the sanding table by hands until it s even and you do the same with the box. Trial fitting until you have a prefect fit. I clamp the sanding table to my workbench to keep it from moving.

- Blackie_

Thanks for the compliments and the advise Blackie – the sanding block is a great idea and I am going to make one. A very long time ago and on a smaller box I used my belt sander to try to smooth out box and lid – big mistake. Ruined the box. This seems a much more controllable way to sand smooth!!

-- Kim - imperfection is the pursuit of perfection

View KimAccurso's profile

KimAccurso

177 posts in 226 days


#11 posted 04-18-2018 11:06 PM


What a great piece Kim.

You did the hinges right, that s the same way I make my hinges, I like the inlay touch you did as well.

As far as cutting your lid, I never thought about doing it the way Alan does it but with my box designs I have no choice but to put the lid to the fence because my boxes are of a hybrid style and the bottoms aren t always even, I have to put feet on the bottoms of my boxes to even it up.

How far out of wack are your cuts at the corners? Mine are never perfect either so what I do to resolve that is by not cutting all the way through the box when cutting the lid, but as Alan also mentioned make sure you have a sharp fine tooth blade. I use a finish blade which has more teeth. Once my cut is done, I use a sharp hand saw (dove tail) saw to finish cutting the lid all the way through. To even out the miss-matched cuts at the corners I sand both the lid and the box on a 17” wide sanding belt that I purchased and cut in half at 23” so the sanding board is 17” x 23” to fit a flat board, it s held down on a 3/4” maple ply board piece that I purchased from the project bend at Homedepot. This will smooth and square up your mismatched corners and the lid will fit perfectly snug.

Here is a picture of the sanding board I made. The belt is 100 grit. You just turn your lid upside down and run it back and forth across the sanding table by hands until it s even and you do the same with the box. Trial fitting until you have a prefect fit. I clamp the sanding table to my workbench to keep it from moving.

- Blackie_

Thanks for the compliments and the advise Blackie – the sanding block is a great idea and I am going to make one. A very long time ago and on a smaller box I used my belt sander to try to smooth out box and lid – big mistake. Ruined the box. This seems a much more controllable way to sand smooth!!

Also, I am just barely out of whack on the corners when cutting the box lid off. I don’t have a lot to spend on many blades but I did recently purchase an Irwin Marples blade – a good one but multi-purpose. It has made a huge difference for my good old job site Rigid table saw. I suppose quite possibly the reason this box cut apart better than previous boxes cut with the blade my saw came with. Either that or that this was my first dovetailed box vs. mitered corner box. The fit ended up darn near perfect using the Leigh jig. Maybe I’ll get crazy with birthday money and buy a fine tooth blade, i’m sure i’d be amazed at the difference. The problem with the Rigid saw is that there is not a good way to make a zero-clearance insert. ugh. I have researched and found this is a problem for owners of that Rigid saw, I’m envious of all you guys who have nice ‘real woodworking’ saws! :)
- KimAccurso

-- Kim - imperfection is the pursuit of perfection

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4883 posts in 2599 days


#12 posted 04-19-2018 11:56 AM

Glad I was able to help, I think it’s the same concept as a drum sander that Alan mentioned only it’s a DYI :)

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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