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Firewood Bowls

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Project by Lazyman posted 04-11-2018 02:14 PM 1033 views 1 time favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’ve gotten where I cannot pass up a pile of tree trimmings waiting to be hauled to the dump without looking through it for some potential turning stock. I also have friends who bring me stuff that isn’t available in my area. Each one has it’s own story which makes it even more interesting (to me anyway).
First picture from left to right:
  • Spalted elm – picked this up from a trash pile at a garage sale I stopped at. It was really wet and punky so I threw a big chunk of it away before I dried and finished the turning. Big mistake. Finished with Tried and True varnish oil applied as a friction finish.
  • Red Oak crotch wood – Pruned from my own tree and aged in the yard for a couple of years. Has a big bark inclusion I find interesting. Finished with Hut Friction finish.
  • Wormy Pecan – Collected after a flood near Comfort, Tx. After I got it home, beetles started coming out and buzzing me in the shop. It has a bunch of tunnels in it, especially near the bark. I decided to try filling the tunnels with turquoise just for fun. Hut Friction Finish
  • Apple – This was brought to me by a friend who got it on a road trip to Maine from a friends firewood pile. It was so old and cracked I almost didn’t bother but I was able to stabilize the cracks with a ton of CA and it was well worth the trouble. One of my favorite pieces. Finished with Hut Friction Finish.
  • Red Oak – More of the red oak crotch, this time in a shallow bowl or platter. Almost no straight grain in this piece. Hut Friction Finish
  • Birch – (Could be Maple?) More firewood brought from Maine. Hard as a rock, which makes me wonder if it is maple. I had a heck of a time getting the tear-out/chatter marks in the end grain sanded smooth. After 2+ hours of sanding and a coat of Hut FF, it looked awful so I sanded the finish off and tried Carl Jacobsen’s technique of sanding with Howard Feed and Wax and within a few minutes the marks went away. Cleaned the Feed and Wax off with mineral spirits and applied a CA finish. A bonus of using the F&W for sanding is that there is no airborne dust.
  • Red Oak – Firewood chunk given to me by a friend in Huntsville, Tx. Finished entirely with Howard Feed and wax—this time leaving it on.
  • Easter Red Cedar – Log was collected from a sandbar on the Guadalupe river near New Braunfels, TX. I originally thought this might be bald cypress but turned out to be cedar. Sanded with Howard Feed and Wax and Finished with Hut Friction finish.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.





15 comments so far

View mborosch's profile

mborosch

6 posts in 161 days


#1 posted 04-11-2018 02:19 PM

Very Nice, I just got into wood turning myself

View wcp's profile

wcp

151 posts in 715 days


#2 posted 04-11-2018 03:17 PM

Nice work on all the bowls. I love it when you can salvage a piece of wood and make something beautiful with it.

Like you I have developed a habit of watching for wood every time I’m out driving. I scored a huge haul not log ago of I think some kind of Elm. There is another location not far from home that locals use to pile cut trees and limbs that eventually get burned. I raided that location recently as well. One large oak log was rotted on the outside but the center 13 to 14 inches was still solid and still green. Its amazing how long large tree trunks hold moisture.

wcp

View doubleG469's profile

doubleG469

644 posts in 560 days


#3 posted 04-11-2018 03:45 PM

very nice, it’s funny once you start turning how every trim truck, brush pile or fallen tree offers a smile and a treasure hunt for something new to turn.

-- Gary, Texas

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12329 posts in 2495 days


#4 posted 04-11-2018 04:31 PM

Nice collection of bowls

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

4999 posts in 2382 days


#5 posted 04-11-2018 06:05 PM

An extremely well turned project!

Twice as good because of the rescued wood too!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View Klondikecraftsman's profile

Klondikecraftsman

52 posts in 168 days


#6 posted 04-11-2018 06:52 PM

It’s a sin to covet your neighbors wife but his woodpile is fair game!

-- It is a sin to covet your neighbor’s wife, but his woodpile is fair game.

View Klondikecraftsman's profile

Klondikecraftsman

52 posts in 168 days


#7 posted 04-11-2018 06:56 PM

Haha! so I was thinking what to use as a signature then I wrote that. New signature for sure. Thanks for the inspiration!

-- It is a sin to covet your neighbor’s wife, but his woodpile is fair game.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1112 posts in 1024 days


#8 posted 04-11-2018 08:40 PM

Nice work, Nathan.

My primary reason for wanting a lathe is the fact that I can’t drive past a wooded area without looking at all the felled trees waiting for be turned into a variety of projects for free.

Still saving my pennies, though. So, for now, I’ll just have to keep marking my best looking scavenging spots of a map.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

3479 posts in 2093 days


#9 posted 04-11-2018 10:55 PM

Nathan, these are some really nice turnings. Amazing what can be found in a fire wood pile! I’ve discovered my favorite species of wood to turn is FOG wood. Found On Ground. :-) You never know what’s inside!

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2384 posts in 1503 days


#10 posted 04-12-2018 02:09 AM

Thanks guys. I give most the things I turn to family and friends. Once you show people the cool things you can do on a lathe with wood that they trashed, all your friends start bringing you interesting chunks of wood from all over the place. And if you haven’t turned any wood from a fruit tree, I highly recommend it. Some of the easiest stuff to turn, especially for beginners, and usually has an interesting color.

Ripper, Heck, a lathe will save you money. For the next 2 or 3 years at least, you won’t have to buy any Christmas or birthday presents for anyone. You’ll be turning what was one someone’s garbage into gifts. That is my story and I am sticking to it. ;-)

Klondike that is a great signature line. Glad I could help. ;-)

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View NormG's profile

NormG

6226 posts in 3119 days


#11 posted 04-12-2018 02:11 AM

When Kroger has firewood I pick up a bundle and you will be amazed the wood you get out of it to make small boxes

-- Norman - I never never make a mistake, I just change the design.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2384 posts in 1503 days


#12 posted 04-12-2018 02:15 AM



When Kroger has firewood I pick up a bundle and you will be amazed the wood you get out of it to make small boxes

- NormG

Hah. I once picked up a bag of mesquite wood chips someone left at the beach because it had a few chunks big enough to turn into file handles.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

12863 posts in 2983 days


#13 posted 04-12-2018 06:18 AM

Nice bunch!

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

21105 posts in 3221 days


#14 posted 04-13-2018 12:34 PM

Beautiful set of bowl. People can’t imagine what is in the firewood pile until you show them things like this!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2384 posts in 1503 days


#15 posted 04-13-2018 12:55 PM

I’m working on my next bowl making experiment, this time with scraps instead of from firewood piles. Trying to make an interesting pattern using the bowl from a board technique. This time I used 1/2” WRC with a poplar wedge for the prototype. I expected this thing to break apart but was able to get it very thin before quitting. Should work a lot better with hardwoods. It literally only weighs 1 oz. The board it is sitting on is a remnant of the board I used to make it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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