LumberJocks

birch blanket chest

  • Advertise with us
Project by jdh122 posted 1401 days ago 2076 views 2 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I made this for a wedding present for a close friend. I vaguely followed the plans from Eagle Lake Woodworking although I did the base differently, used box instead of dovetail joints, used individual boards instead of plywood for the bottom and did the top out of two instead of one piece of plywood.
The whole piece was made out of recovered wood – mostly it came from a church pew that I bought (don’t worry, it wasn’t an antique). All of that wood was too thick, so had to be re-sawn on the tablesaw. But as I didn’t want to throw away the off-cuts, I glued several of these together in order not to throw them away (in the picture of the joint you can see where the splines that were holding the pieces for the pew bottom were left in since I didn’t want to lose all of that wood, plus you can also see that some of the pieces were glued together from two pieces of thinner stock). There is also wood from a school desk that I found in the garbage, and from some old pieces of hardwood floor that I got from a friend. The bottom is made of eastern hemlock that I had left over from a compost bin I built. And the plywood for the top comes from the back of that same pew.
This was my first attempt at the box joint, and I cut the shorter pieces on the router table with a simple shop-made jig. But I found it too hard to try to hold the long pieces vertical, so I used a handheld router with a pattern-cutting bit and then squared them on the bandsaw. It worked fairly well, although one of the four corners turned out pretty rough (that was the one where I tried to square the cuts using a handsaw and chisel before I figured out that the bandsaw would work much better).
I’m a bit embarrassed at the quality of the miters on the top – you can see that I had to fill one of them with a lot of epoxy and sawdust. This is because I originally made the top about 4 inches too long (measure twice, etc), and had to muscle the whole top through the tablesaw with the miter gauge, and then do a plunge-cut straight across with the circular saw, and re-glue it, thereby sacrificing my near-perfect (at least by my rather lax standards) miters.
Overall I’m pretty happy with the results, although sometimes doubt that it was wise to decide to work with all recovered wood (I spent almost as much time getting the wood ready to use as actually making the piece).

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests





3 comments so far

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2687 posts in 1660 days


#1 posted 1401 days ago

I like it and I’m sure the recipients will as well. You know…. I can’t speak for everyone else, but I enjoy seeing projects like there where you can see folks grow in their skills. So you made a few mistakes. The thing is you learned from them. The funny thing is …. Down the line sometime you will see your old friend (the chest) and cant help but smile remembering the lessons you learned with it.

Congratulations…. You did good!

Ohhh … And I almost forgot. Welcome to Lumber Jocks!

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1421 days


#2 posted 1401 days ago

It’s a beautiful project! The bride will LOVE it…

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View cwdance1's profile

cwdance1

1143 posts in 1842 days


#3 posted 1400 days ago

Great design, wonderful wood.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase