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Miter Saw Dust Hood

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Project by AZWoody posted 02-26-2018 09:13 PM 2160 views 3 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A couple years ago, I was looking at some aftermarket solutions for a dust hood for my sliding miter saw.
There were some fabric tents that looked like they would have worked but honestly look rather ridiculous.

The saw I had at the time was the Craftsman Compact sliding miter saw. I do a lot of blanks for turners so I use it a lot for cutting them down to length. I didn’t even try to use the stock dust hose attachment as I knew that wasn’t going to work. I didn’t have a shop vac at the time that I would have been sufficient to even try and I also know that at best, only a fraction of the dust would be collected

After looking around I decided I would try to make my own. I took 2 pieces of Plywood and made the sides as shown. Then, I had a piece of bendy plywood and put that on the back in the front, I made a narrow frame from some scrap poplar. Then, I took pieces of 1/8” hardboard and made a face with certain areas cut out for the contour of the saw.

I made sure that it had clearance all around not just when it’s in the back position but anything that moves forward has a place to pass through as well. Then, I made some cuts to the face to allow clearance of any parts when I’m cutting any 45 degree miters.

In the back, underneath the back of the saw is a “Big Gulp” dust hood that’s placed in a recess and points down to a pipe that runs to the dust collector. Originally, it was a 4” pipe to a Harbor Freight dust collector but eventually I upgraded to a Clearvue Cyclone with 6” ducting. I had to cut open the bottom to fit the pipe inside and ended up getting substantially more suction.

After I switched to the Hitachi shown, I remade the face to fit the new profile and added a layer of cork which would allow me to pin any info and sizing I might need for current projects.

As for results, I couldn’t be more pleased. Every now and then I might get a little chip flung out to the front but you can actively see any fine dust being sucked in and the area around the saw stays clean. In the back corners inside the hood, there is some buildup but as long as it’s in the hood, it’s not a problem.





14 comments so far

View marshallLaw's profile

marshallLaw

17 posts in 829 days


#1 posted 02-27-2018 01:11 AM

Very Nice.
I also have an Hitachi Miter saw and may well copy your idea – including the essential Alex Dot!!

View mut's profile

mut

14 posts in 231 days


#2 posted 02-27-2018 01:17 AM

Imitation is the best form of flattery. Consider yourself flattered! I am going to make one of these!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

671 posts in 603 days


#3 posted 02-27-2018 09:22 AM

Awesome. Grabbing up the dust from a miter saw is one of the toughest jobs there is in the shop.

If you have an older painting tarp, you can cut them up and use them like the plastic flaps they let hang down at a warehouse type building in colder climates. They allow movement through, but decrease constant airflow, so you DC suction is better utilized, but if you are down to an occasional chip, well you may not need to bother.

-- Think safe, be safe

View stidrvr's profile

stidrvr

36 posts in 3504 days


#4 posted 02-27-2018 01:27 PM

Curious what youre using the Echo Dot for. Or is it just music?

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

5301 posts in 1168 days


#5 posted 02-27-2018 01:27 PM

Nice work Charles. Those saws make a helluva mess so if you’ve got it sucking that much dust up, you’re way ahead of me!!

I am curious, do you have an Echo Dot at every tool you own or is it just at the miter saw? ;-))

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View kocgolf's profile

kocgolf

323 posts in 2208 days


#6 posted 02-27-2018 02:19 PM

Almost exactly what I tried to do with mine. It works ok, but not as well as I hoped. I suspect that has far more to do with my HF dust collector and 4” port than it does with the design itself. One thing I did that improved things dramatically for me is to hook my shop vac to the built in dust port and actually run both DC and Vac together when I cut. It can be a lot of hassle, but to keep dust down from that stupid machine I will try anything.

View abie's profile

abie

875 posts in 3800 days


#7 posted 02-27-2018 04:27 PM

Nice however what about it’s movement while cutting angles?

-- Bruce. a mind is like a book it is only useful when open.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1346 posts in 1253 days


#8 posted 02-27-2018 04:33 PM

Post pics, I’d like to see if there’s something you might come up with that I could do to make it better.

A couple things to mention. Underneath the miter saw, you will want to plug all the holes under the base. I had shop towels stuck in there to keep all the air coming in from above the table. The ones are missing in my post as I had just cleaned everything using my blower so they got knocked out.

Also, you can see that I still have the 2 1/2” hose attached to the dust collection port and I just have it hanging down into the dust pipe. It does help. Without the hose, the dust tends to hit the back and has a chance to deflect forward.
There is enough suction on the small hose to pull it down into the larger pipe.

For the MarshallLaw, I have mine set purely as 90 degree crosscut. You may need to trim some more on the face to get rotation without hitting the front face from the saw.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1346 posts in 1253 days


#9 posted 02-27-2018 04:34 PM



Nice however what about it s movement while cutting angles?

- abie

Just typed my response when you asked that. It’s easy, just cut the front panels to make clearance for anything that might hit it. My last saw I had it cut to do 90 and 45 anglers.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1346 posts in 1253 days


#10 posted 02-27-2018 04:36 PM



Curious what youre using the Echo Dot for. Or is it just music?

- stidrvr

Alexa, Start the dust collector.

Alexa, Close the gate to the planer

Alexa, Open the gate to the miter saw…

Alexa’s response….”Sorry, I do not know what the hell you’re talking about. Would you like to listen to a song like you always do?

Yeah, i guess it’s pretty much just for music for now, haha.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1346 posts in 1253 days


#11 posted 02-27-2018 04:39 PM



Almost exactly what I tried to do with mine. It works ok, but not as well as I hoped. I suspect that has far more to do with my HF dust collector and 4” port than it does with the design itself. One thing I did that improved things dramatically for me is to hook my shop vac to the built in dust port and actually run both DC and Vac together when I cut. It can be a lot of hassle, but to keep dust down from that stupid machine I will try anything.

- kocgolf

Even with the HF it worked but the key is to make sure you have the face opening cut to give the minimal clearance possible to keep the air velocity as quick as possible. depending on the saw, it might be helpful to have some kind of plate to gently divert the dust to the side instead of it hitting the armature and bouncing directly forward as well.

I’m even thinking of using some kind of spandex to attach tot he upper sides and the miter saw to keep the air flowing from the arbor on down only. I’m always trying to think of minor improvements but so far, this has outperformed anything else I have seen in any store or hardwood dealer where they cut pieces for customers.

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

3528 posts in 1307 days


#12 posted 02-27-2018 05:03 PM

I have always thought the way to collect much of the dust from a miter saw would to build beneath the spray area a downdraft table. So a triangle of holes connected to the dust collector. I think this would supplement your hood idea.

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

671 posts in 603 days


#13 posted 02-27-2018 09:22 PM



I have always thought the way to collect much of the dust from a miter saw would to build beneath the spray area a downdraft table. So a triangle of holes connected to the dust collector. I think this would supplement your hood idea.

- Combo Prof

I imagine every chop saw has a differences, but I have never been around one if viewed from the side that doesn’t shoot out a spray of dust out and past anything the saw sits on. That is why you will end up with a considerable pile of sawdust about 4 feet behind one that doesn’t get cleaned up routinely, unless it is up against a wall, which is essentially what OP’s box is doing, stopping that blast.

After stopping that, the next thing to do is corral the reminder. I just don’t see an open air dust control, like a downdraft table, being able to pull hard enough to pull down that flow, so it would fly right over it. That is my guess after over 55 years of using using these, and RAS’s. Dust needs to be boxed in to even approach controlling it. Problem is to totally utilize the saw it needs to also move around a bit, makes keeping it in a box hard to do.

Not trying to steal the thread, but a few questions to readers…

Has anyone here tried the cloth based umbrella thingies? Do they work? Have you used both a box, and the cloth model, which is better?

-- Think safe, be safe

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1346 posts in 1253 days


#14 posted 02-27-2018 09:41 PM


I have always thought the way to collect much of the dust from a miter saw would to build beneath the spray area a downdraft table. So a triangle of holes connected to the dust collector. I think this would supplement your hood idea.

- Combo Prof

I imagine every chop saw has a differences, but I have never been around one if viewed from the side that doesn t shoot out a spray of dust out and past anything the saw sits on. That is why you will end up with a considerable pile of sawdust about 4 feet behind one that doesn t get cleaned up routinely, unless it is up against a wall, which is essentially what OP s box is doing, stopping that blast.

After stopping that, the next thing to do is corral the reminder. I just don t see an open air dust control, like a downdraft table, being able to pull hard enough to pull down that flow, so it would fly right over it. That is my guess after over 55 years of using using these, and RAS s. Dust needs to be boxed in to even approach controlling it. Problem is to totally utilize the saw it needs to also move around a bit, makes keeping it in a box hard to do.

Not trying to steal the thread, but a few questions to readers…

Has anyone here tried the cloth based umbrella thingies? Do they work? Have you used both a box, and the cloth model, which is better?

- therealSteveN

To address the umbrella vs box I didn’t try the umbrella but I did run the miter saw without the front face and that makes it much like the umbrella.

The fine dust still just goes everywhere. The large stuff will mostly fall into the base and get sucked in but the problem is that suction can only pull things in from so far. Anything big will hit the umbrella and gravity will help funnel it down to the pipe but anything light, such as dust will whirl away and into the air.

The smaller the opening around the miter saw as it’s cutting, the more air velocity there is to keep the dust from escaping. The front face can be cut to allow any miter angles to be set.

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