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Super Dust Deputy Cart

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Project by Nick posted 02-15-2018 03:47 AM 3980 views 29 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This design was inspired by DadoDog’s Dust Deputy cart for his shop vac and the Super Dust Deputy setup he built. I bought a 1.5hp Magnum dust collector with the bag filter. I also bought a super dust deputy and an Oneida hepa filter upgrade. Everything is 5/8” sanded pine plywood and 2×4’s. The bottom is an airtight box above a 60L plastic tote. The bottom is screwed to the metal base that came with the stock dust collector. The filter and collector ring are held down by a long piece of ready rod. The fine dust just collects in the ring. I’m not sure if I’ll have to add a separate bid there as the cyclone does a really good job of separating the dust.

I plan to change the door out for plexi so I can see the dust level but as the bin is relatively small, I empty it often. This is because I toss it with my household garage and the can won’t fit a big bag of chips with our other trash. I have a separate can with a bag I just dump it into.

So far, it works great. (The paint was from a test colour we got for the house and didn’t use. It was close enough to the factory Magnum colour I couldn’t resist.)

-- My moustache filters wood chips and sawdust out of my scotch - Nick Offerman





20 comments so far

View AndyPickler's profile

AndyPickler

15 posts in 1371 days


#1 posted 02-15-2018 11:34 AM

That is the cleanest, most compact version of a Super Dust Deputy I’ve ever seen. Definitely inspiration for what I want to do with my own single stage collector. Thanks for posting!

View Revhard's profile

Revhard

36 posts in 719 days


#2 posted 02-15-2018 12:56 PM

Wow, thats crazy!! I was just thinking about doing the exact same thing but with a bigger container! Ive seen people put a bag with the filter, but if the SDD does its job then there would be noreason. Awesome job man

View Woodtodust's profile

Woodtodust

48 posts in 1835 days


#3 posted 02-15-2018 01:12 PM

Nick. I agree with AndyPickler. Your design is very elegant. I have been looking at other Super Dust Deputy configurations for months and this one is by far the best. Great job.

-- Bill...Richmond Hill, GA--"83% of all statistics are made up."

View Nick's profile

Nick

20 posts in 1245 days


#4 posted 02-15-2018 02:29 PM

Thanks for the kind words guys. My goal was to make something compact and not 8’-10’ tall. I’m sure that there’s some loss with the down pipe but this thing sucks up everything I throw at it. It sits about 5’ at the top of the filter, 6’ to the top of the motor. Make is easy to roll around and it’s very stable.

-- My moustache filters wood chips and sawdust out of my scotch - Nick Offerman

View AndyPickler's profile

AndyPickler

15 posts in 1371 days


#5 posted 02-15-2018 03:08 PM

@Nick

Yes, the compact-ness and mobility of the design makes it a gotta-do for me. In my case I think (not sure) I can send the output of the blower straight over into the top of the filter (with an 90degree bend downwards into the filter). Of course, I’d have to rotate the Super Dust Deputy another 90 degrees, so that it sends its air straight to the filter…which then implies that the inlet would be rotated the same 90 degrees. I don’t think that would be a problem for me.

Do you have any details (words and/or pictures) on what you did to the bottom container to make it air-tight? Silicone inside? A foam seal around that door that drops down (from what I can tell of the picture)?

View Nick's profile

Nick

20 posts in 1245 days


#6 posted 02-15-2018 03:18 PM

Hi Andy

You nailed it. All the joints are siliconed and I used 1/4” closed cell foam to seal the door. Simple latches at the top and some hinges I had laying around at the bottom. I worried about collapsing the plastic container but with it in a plywood box, it’s subject to equal pressure on all sides so its happy.

Cheers

Nick

-- My moustache filters wood chips and sawdust out of my scotch - Nick Offerman

View kocgolf's profile

kocgolf

310 posts in 2176 days


#7 posted 02-15-2018 09:31 PM

Okay, that is beautiful. To be the devil’s advocate, I can see one way to possibly simplify and squeeze the tiniest performance boost out of it. If you rotate the motor so the filter output points straight towards the filter stack, then invert the whole stack so the filter is on the bottom…no curving, sticking out pipe needed. Straight motor to filter inlet. I can’t tell if you have a small bag or particle catcher under the filter, but it looks like the filter has a capped top. Can you remove it so it’s just a open tube? If so, the bag or pail or other such secondary particle collector can just be secured to the bottom. Like this…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RAoj4urS-Y

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

490 posts in 579 days


#8 posted 02-16-2018 12:01 AM

Very nice – really cool.

View twoblacklabs's profile

twoblacklabs

258 posts in 2689 days


#9 posted 02-16-2018 12:04 AM

Way cool!

-- If You Haven't Got the Time to Do It Right, When Will You Find the Time to Do It Over?

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

671 posts in 537 days


#10 posted 02-16-2018 12:19 AM

I have to admit that is pretty cool!

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View Nick's profile

Nick

20 posts in 1245 days


#11 posted 02-16-2018 01:29 AM

Re kocgolf, I thought about doing something like that but I didn’t want all of the debris that makes it past the cyclone to have to go past the filter to get into the bucket. The airflow would naturally take it into the filter pleats since only gravity would drop it into the bucket. Everything that would get to that point would be really small (light) so it would require me to clean the filter more often. My thought was that to combat the down pipe, the filter would need to go directly from the motor and up with a bin below. This blew the compactness that I was shooting for.

I’m sure that I lost a little performance this way but it collects everything from the jointer so I figure it’s good enough.

-- My moustache filters wood chips and sawdust out of my scotch - Nick Offerman

View Paul Stoops's profile

Paul Stoops

348 posts in 2558 days


#12 posted 02-16-2018 01:36 AM

You did a really great job of packaging your dust collector!

However, I agree with kocgolf—eliminating the duct and two elbows between the fan and the filter ring will definitely improve performance. With a 1.5HP DC, and the inherent loss of the Dust Deputy, you need to preserve as much of the performance as possible so it can do its job. It will also probably reduce the noise level somewhat, as the high velocity air directly from the fan into that elbow will be a major source of noise.

As suggested, it is a good idea to have a container (bucket, bag, etc.) under the filter. It will make cleaning the filter much easier, as you can tap on the outside of the filter to help the dust fall from the pleats into the container.

Your build looks very professionally done! Good job!

-- Paul, Auburn, WA

View kocgolf's profile

kocgolf

310 posts in 2176 days


#13 posted 02-16-2018 03:40 AM

That’s the problem with dust collectors (not costing 2 grand). You have to give up something. I have the HF with the Deputy and wynn on it and yes, I am giving up suction for separation, and yeah I guess I am ok with that. For what it’s worth, my filter config is the same as you have it, although it’s all permanent duct and has a straight shot pipe to the filter/bag mount. That said, seeing this incredible compact cart, it has me rethinking permanent ducting. I know I am loosing suction in my 25 feet of 4 foot run to the tablesaw. If I could make the whole thing as compact you have it there, and get right up next to each tool somehow, I would gain a lot of flow. You probably get much better flow than I do simply because you can move right up next to the machines.

View Nick's profile

Nick

20 posts in 1245 days


#14 posted 02-16-2018 04:15 AM

I read somewhere (I think it was Schwarz’s blog) that mobile DC’s offer a lot more flexibility, save the cost of no piping and dust gates, and keep the performance from dropping. I have rearranged my shop about every 6 months so this is what sealed the mobile design for me.

Since I’m the only one in the shop, it’s super easy to just pop the hose from tool to tool.

-- My moustache filters wood chips and sawdust out of my scotch - Nick Offerman

View AndyPickler's profile

AndyPickler

15 posts in 1371 days


#15 posted 02-16-2018 11:38 AM

Nick…I can’t tell from the pictures. Is that a 5” flex hose straight out of the Dust Deputy, or did you use a 5-to-4 reducer right at the inlet? If it’s a 5” hose, do you just use some sort of reducer right at each tool?

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