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Stone Inlay People into Walnut

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Project by drawninstone posted 01-30-2018 04:25 PM 735 views 1 time favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Stone Inlay People into Walnut
Stone Inlay People into Walnut No picture No picture No picture No picture No picture
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This was my first attempt at trying to capture realistic people in stone and wood. The routering of the design into the wood was definitely the most nerve-wracking part since every bit of wood that I was leaving was an integral line for the design. Usually I can move lines around a bit to account for unexpectedly “grabby” wood grain or things like that – but with people if you don’t get the lines in just the right place it’s pretty obvious.
I definitely learned a LOT from this piece that will hopefully be making the next one better (or at least easier).
The wood is walnut inlaid with calcite, howlite, jasper, sodalite, biotite, obsidian, limestone, fuchsite and malachite.

-- Darci, http://www.drawninstone.com





14 comments so far

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ClaudeF

655 posts in 1704 days


#1 posted 01-30-2018 04:29 PM

View NCTurner's profile

NCTurner

53 posts in 1153 days


#2 posted 01-30-2018 05:05 PM

That’s incredible, great job!

-- One good turn deserves another!

View pottz's profile

pottz

2597 posts in 981 days


#3 posted 01-30-2018 05:42 PM

very beautiful and unique.i dont think ive ever seen work like this before combining wood and stone.you did a fantastic job on this.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Rick's profile (online now)

Rick

9594 posts in 3029 days


#4 posted 01-30-2018 11:22 PM

Very Nice, Well Done & Beautiful!!

-- LIFE is what happens when you're planning on doing Other Things!

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

10479 posts in 3425 days


#5 posted 01-30-2018 11:33 PM

Awesome!

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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MontanaBob

830 posts in 2680 days


#6 posted 01-31-2018 12:00 AM

Outstanding…..

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Jacksdad

172 posts in 420 days


#7 posted 01-31-2018 12:14 PM

Holy crap, that’s awesome

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

31056 posts in 2863 days


#8 posted 01-31-2018 01:58 PM

You did a very nice job on this wall plaque. I imagine some of these materials need a lot of extra care, but it came out beautifully. Nice work!

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View drawninstone's profile

drawninstone

40 posts in 589 days


#9 posted 01-31-2018 02:15 PM


You did a very nice job on this wall plaque. I imagine some of these materials need a lot of extra care, but it came out beautifully. Nice work!

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

- helluvawreck

Some of the rocks do require some extra attention – calcite is really soft and easy to gouge for example. It’s mostly the transitions between different types of rock and the rock and wood. Really, it’s kinda similar to the attention needed when dealing with having different types of wood against each other.

-- Darci, http://www.drawninstone.com

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2630 posts in 2879 days


#10 posted 01-31-2018 04:19 PM

Wow, incredible work!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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mikeacg

436 posts in 1054 days


#11 posted 02-01-2018 02:35 PM

As always, beautiful work! I’d like to see a close-up to understand how you managed to blend the colors so well. Thanks for sharing!

-- Mike, A Yooper with a drawl, http://www.artcentergraphics.com

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GR8HUNTER

3821 posts in 709 days


#12 posted 02-01-2018 03:17 PM

WOW Darci ..your work is incredible beautiful excellent …GREAT JOB :<)) GRATZ TOP 3

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

436 posts in 2331 days


#13 posted 02-02-2018 02:54 AM

interesting, creative and unique

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View drawninstone's profile

drawninstone

40 posts in 589 days


#14 posted 02-02-2018 01:50 PM



As always, beautiful work! I d like to see a close-up to understand how you managed to blend the colors so well. Thanks for sharing!

- mikeacg

I’ll try to get some more in-progress pics for the next piece to hopefully help explain how I do the color fades – but here’s the best explanation I can give you right now.
I start by crushing the rocks down so that I have pieces from a little smaller than a dime down to fine powder. For this piece the rocks that are the top layer are semi-translucent – so I first put down layers of fairly finely crushed base color rocks in some areas and in other areas I used the walnut as the base color. Then I use tweezers to pick out individual pieces of the top layer rock that are the color I want (when you crush a chunk of rock you end up with a variety of colors from the same rock) and place those exactly where I want them to get the final color that I’m looking for. Once I have the whole design filled, I glue it up, let it dry and then sand it flush. I then repeat the process of placing the right color rocks with tweezers, gluing and sanding over and over using finer and finer grades of rock until there are no more voids in the piece.
That’s kind of a quick and dirty explanation of it. I have some pics of the process on my website www.drawninstone.com in the “About the Art” section and I’ll try to remember to take some so I can post them with the next piece I post.

-- Darci, http://www.drawninstone.com

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