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Large Walnut Panels with Sapwood 2’ x 5'

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Project by NickJonesDesigns posted 01-24-2018 04:49 PM 600 views 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These large walnut panels were created to highlight the creamy natural sapwood. Each panel is made of solid walnut.

Walnut being what it is finding semi straight usable boards was challenging. To end up with a flat panel, 3/4” square tubing was cut into sixteen sections which fit across the width of the panel. All other caul materials would deform or were too thick to fit underneath the clamps on the bottom side of the panel. The metal cauls provided the perfect balance of strength and thickness. Once all metal cauls were clamped in place the panel was flat and left to rest in the clamps for at least 6 hours.

The panels were then sanded smooth in a drum sander and the edges received a 3/8” round over to ensure a comfortable seat for future patrons.

3 heavy coats of a spar urethane finish and the seats were ready for installation in a local restaurant.

-- Nick Jones Designs, www.nickjonesdesigns.com





7 comments so far

View ohwoodeye's profile

ohwoodeye

1952 posts in 3060 days


#1 posted 01-24-2018 04:52 PM

Smooth and Creamy. Looks really nice.
Well done.

-- Directions are just the Manufacturer's opinion on how something should be assembled. ----Mike, Waukesha, WI

View pottz's profile

pottz

2590 posts in 891 days


#2 posted 01-24-2018 05:20 PM

great job,i love how you left the boards with sap wood in,most furniture makers would cut all that out.i love the contrast.nice work.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Shaneswoodcuts's profile

Shaneswoodcuts

15 posts in 31 days


#3 posted 01-24-2018 06:03 PM

The metal you have clamped, is that to make sure the boards stay level? I’m pretty new to this so forgive the stupid question, I could probably answer it myself… But I ask because I use 1/4” flat steel 1.5×36” to help with my clamping and it still doesn’t come out great. It might be the clamps I’m using or if there is such a thing as clamping technique, I’m sure mine still sucks! These look great! I LOVE the color contrast. Walnut and hickory are some of my favorites to work with because of the unique color contrasts and edge grain patterns!

-- Shane

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

1620 posts in 1529 days


#4 posted 01-24-2018 06:16 PM

beautiful seats and backs – sap wood is good

curious tho – a restaurant that can put in walnut seating probably has a $12.00 hot dog ?
( if they serve such an item )

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View pottz's profile

pottz

2590 posts in 891 days


#5 posted 01-24-2018 06:26 PM



beautiful seats and backs – sap wood is good

curious tho – a restaurant that can put in walnut seating probably has a $12.00 hot dog ?
( if they serve such an item )

- recycle1943

id say a 19.50 hamburger-served with a nice cabernet-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View NickJonesDesigns's profile

NickJonesDesigns

57 posts in 1349 days


#6 posted 01-24-2018 08:42 PM



The metal you have clamped, is that to make sure the boards stay level? I m pretty new to this so forgive the stupid question, I could probably answer it myself… But I ask because I use 1/4” flat steel 1.5×36” to help with my clamping and it still doesn t come out great. It might be the clamps I m using or if there is such a thing as clamping technique, I m sure mine still sucks! These look great! I LOVE the color contrast. Walnut and hickory are some of my favorites to work with because of the unique color contrasts and edge grain patterns!

- Shaneswoodcuts

Flat bar will bend. Best to use 3/4”+ tubing for rigidity.

-- Nick Jones Designs, www.nickjonesdesigns.com

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

261 posts in 1639 days


#7 posted 01-25-2018 05:27 PM

Thanks for sharing. I like the sapwood as well. I’ll consider the use of square tubing for cauls for future projects.

Did you use any biscuits or dowels to help with alignment? It looks to me like there was minimal attempt to do grain matching (e.g. sapwood to sapwood OR heartwood to heartwood)—was that by design or primarily to reduce cost?

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