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Tin Ceiling Tile Mirror Frame

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Project by Ripper70 posted 01-14-2018 11:19 PM 273 views 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Tin Ceiling Tile Mirror Frame
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Hey All,

After more than 2 years as a member of this indispensable forum, and after having learned so much from the skilled and talented woodworkers on this site, I figured it was about time to post a project of my own. I never start a project without searching through these archives to learn as much as I can about the techniques that you professionals use in an effort to employ them in my own work. I’d like to thank the community for all the inspirational information you provide and for all the contributions that make this site a part of my every day.

A little background; When my wife and I moved into our home a few years ago, there were several mirrored walls that we decided to do away with. At the time, I just couldn’t bring myself to toss these heavy 1/4” thick, full size wall mirrors in the trash so I found a spot in the garage to store them. I’ve been wanting to turn one into a stand-up mirror and finally decided how I would construct the frame. It was to be a Christmas gift for the wife this year.

Since Christmastime with 2 kids can put a pinch on the finances, the call to action was inspired mostly because I’ve accumulated so much “scrap wood” that I really didn’t need to spend too much money to complete the project.

I wanted a nice thick frame so I started by laminating some 3/4” plywood for the styles and rails, cut them to 6” wide then edge banded them to hide the ply layers…

Next I used tin ceiling tiles, cut to size, to cover the face of the frame and then used trim molding to conceal the cut edges along the inside perimeter…

A cutout section of a larger tile with a matching pattern, was used along the top of the frame to add some character and some heft in order that it would help balance the look of housing such a large piece of glass (the mirror itself currently measures 67” x 30” and that’s after I had to lob off a 25” section so it would clear the ceiling)...

Next, I bent some wood to conceal the edge of the top piece using the cutoff and some clamps…

Finally, some gold spray lacquer…

Then some antiquing glaze and 3 coats of spray on clear poly…

I’m pleased with the results and my dearest was ecstatic with her gift, which was really the best part of all.

Thanks for looking!

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo





6 comments so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1864 posts in 1124 days


#1 posted 01-15-2018 04:03 PM

Excellent way to recycle 8^)

It looks like you spent some serious time thinking this all through, that frame is very substantial and you avoided the #1 mistake I tend to do, make the frame a fraction too small to fit the mirror!

How did you attach it to the wall?

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

766 posts in 810 days


#2 posted 01-15-2018 04:39 PM



Excellent way to recycle 8^)

It looks like you spent some serious time thinking this all through, that frame is very substantial and you avoided the #1 mistake I tend to do, make the frame a fraction too small to fit the mirror!

How did you attach it to the wall?

- splintergroup

Yeah, the mirror was collecting dust for almost 3 years so I had plenty of time to think it through. Believe me, I’ve learned from previous goofs regarding making the frame the correct size to fit the mirror. When I laminated the ply for the frame, I made the adjoining piece on the back just small enough to fit the mirror and the several wooden cleats that I screwed and glued to secure it.

The darn thing ended up being so heavy (probably over 170 lbs.) and large, I needed both of my kids to help me bring it out through the garage and in through the front door. Covered it in a canvas tarp and put a bow on it.

The mirror is just leaning against the wall but I’ve attached a steel wire to a wall anchor and a wood screw near the top of the frame to keep it from accidentally tipping. But it’s so heavy I can barely budge it so I’m not too concerned. It’d take a medium sized earthquake to get the thing to fall over.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

30112 posts in 2768 days


#3 posted 01-15-2018 08:23 PM

This project turned out beautifully and it’s always nice to be able to recycle some material. You did a very nice job on this. Congratulations.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

766 posts in 810 days


#4 posted 01-15-2018 09:42 PM

Thanks, Charles. My only complaint about the mirror is the reflection I see when I stand in front of it!

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

93 posts in 1194 days


#5 posted 01-18-2018 12:21 AM

Cool project and skillfully made.
Love the placement and your cool house. :D

-- James E McIntyre

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

766 posts in 810 days


#6 posted 01-18-2018 01:41 AM

Thank you, James. I see you’ve tackled the mirror framing project yourself. I’m looking forward to making another.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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