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Self-centering Mortice Jig for Router

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Project by W.F. Judt posted 01-05-2018 12:23 AM 3171 views 4 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hi:
Today’s shop activity was to make a self-centering Mortice Jig for my Makita Router. Actually, today’s activity was to make a third, and successful, attempt at this project. Yesterday ended with two failed jigs and a bit of frustration on my part.

But I slept on it and managed to pull it off this afternoon.

Photo 1: shows the jig mounted under the router, in place of the regular base.
Photo 2: shows the guide pins protruding under the router base, which guide the tools along the edges of the board to be morticed.
Photo 3: here you can see the underside of the jig more clearly.
Photo 4: Notice the four screw which attach the base to the router. Also the two steel guide pins.
Photo 5: This is the face of the jig that is hidden under the base of the router.
Photo 6: This shows the underside of the jig removed from the router.

The drilling had to be REALLY precise for all this to work.

The centre hole was See you there! with a hole saw. Quick and easy. The rest of the holes were cut with forstner bits. After installing the pins and their locking nuts, I epoxied them in permanently.





6 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117328 posts in 3775 days


#1 posted 01-05-2018 02:46 AM

Welcome to Ljs glad to have you aboard.
That’s the way to get it done “if at first, you don’t succeed…”

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

View George_SA's profile

George_SA

370 posts in 2411 days


#2 posted 01-05-2018 06:17 AM

Good JOB!

My approach to woodwork: I don’t look upon unsuccessful tries as failures. To me it is part of the learning curve. I think every woodworker has experiences where things don’t work out, but it gives you the opportunity to achieve better results in the end as you learn from your mistakes. Thanks to our fellow woodworkers on this forum sharing their creations it gives one the opportunity to learn from their expertise as well. Reading about their struggles to get it right gives me hope that I am not the only one who doesn’t get it perfect first time and encourages me to try again.

Thanks for sharing. I’m sure you will get a lot of use from that jig.

-- Sometimes life gets in the way of one's woodworking :)

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

32087 posts in 3064 days


#3 posted 01-05-2018 03:40 PM

It’s a nice jig. Congratulations and welcome to Lumberjocks.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View Grumpy's profile (online now)

Grumpy

24624 posts in 4048 days


#4 posted 01-05-2018 09:26 PM

Nice job and congratulations on your ‘Daily Top 3’ award.
I see you like making jigs. It sure is a great past time.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

13350 posts in 3065 days


#5 posted 01-06-2018 12:42 PM

Interesting concept, it realy might work.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1674 posts in 772 days


#6 posted 01-06-2018 11:41 PM

Good on you for keeping after it. Persistence in anything is the best way to success, plus as already mentioned a mistake is just a learning opportunity.

2 Observations.

Starting to make one from a “known center” is the quickest path to success, and for that a “centering pin” is your friend. Most router brands sell one, or good old Milescraft can fit most anything with their helpful pieces.

You may find on some projects your pins to be a bit too long, to be successful with that type of centering jig it just requires you to make a good purchase along the sides of your piece, even 3/4” projection is often long enough. I wouldn’t scrap those bolts, but you may find the need to make up a set of shorter ones if you have to go down onto something where depth matters..

Most of your work will be left to right with that lovely jig. Keep plugging forward.

-- Think safe, be safe

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