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Pizza anyone?

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Project by Builder_Bob posted 08-10-2010 03:28 AM 1466 views 5 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

So my wife and I discovered that the frozen pizzas these days are not like the greasy lumps of yesteryear. Perfectly respectable pizzas rivaling (or exceeding) store made can be had in a few minutes for a few bucks.

You can have a delicious pizza with the toppings of your choice, especially if you provide them. The only “sticking point” comes when you try to cut them. The cheese sticks to the knife, the tomatoes slide away, the crust goes from slimy to crunchy and is impossible to cut.

I longed for a pizza cutter like they use in the pizza shop. You know, bam, bam, bam, bam, and it’s done. I shopped for a pizza knife, and surprisingly this curved plastic knife was highly recommended by all. So be it.

What’s left but the cutting board? My first, made from cherry and coyote wood (I had them in the wood pile).

The result, spectacular! Pizza anyone?

-- "The unexpected, when it happens, generally happens when you least expect it."





11 comments so far

View smitty22's profile

smitty22

615 posts in 1635 days


#1 posted 08-10-2010 05:12 AM

Nice cutting board, pizza looks great!

-- Smitty

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1738 days


#2 posted 08-10-2010 06:01 AM

Way to dress up the pizza presentation!

Is that the Mario Batali pizza cutter? Looks like it.

Are you calling it a pizza board? Maybe pizza wheel is a better name for it? After all, it seems a bit more playful with that name.

Although I’m not familiar with that Cab. Franc, I’m guessing it’s a good pairing with a tomato-topped pizza, yes?

Nice board, by the way… almost forgot to mention that!

Six-feet seems like it would be a good number to have on the bottom of a round board like you’ve done here. I don’t think I’d go any less. Does 6-feet seem to be adequate?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Popsnsons's profile

Popsnsons

327 posts in 1669 days


#3 posted 08-10-2010 06:45 AM

Nice project…goes good with a little vino!

-- Pops ~ In So Cal...

View wseand's profile

wseand

2415 posts in 1730 days


#4 posted 08-10-2010 06:54 AM

Just had myself a few slices and it was good, came with Hatch Green Chilies on it. I like your Pizza Cutter.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View ghazard's profile (online now)

ghazard

380 posts in 2197 days


#5 posted 08-10-2010 04:16 PM

Bob, great idea. My wife and I make Boboli pizzas all the time…where has this idea been all my life!

Can you give me a quick description of the method you used to cut the round shape?

Thanks, well done!

Greg

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View Builder_Bob's profile

Builder_Bob

160 posts in 1747 days


#6 posted 08-10-2010 04:59 PM

That’s right, a Mario Batali nylon pizza knife. I’m sure it is better for the cutting board too. I like to think that the plastic knife and the wooden board help to keep the pizza warm.

The wine comes from our annual trek to Ithaca to celebrate my daughter’s birthday, and the resulting wine tasting opportunities around lake Cayuga and lake Seneca. Not noted for their dry reds, but everything tastes pretty good after your third or fourth wine tasting. Came back with four cases.

Six screwed on feet near the edge worked out well, it’s a darn heavy board! The feet keep it from sliding around the counter.

I cut the circle with a shop made router base that pivoted about that little screw hole you can almost make out in the picture of the underside. Used a long straight bit, lowered down about an 1/8” for each pass. Lots of mess, lots of vacuuming.

-- "The unexpected, when it happens, generally happens when you least expect it."

View ocwoodworker's profile

ocwoodworker

204 posts in 1692 days


#7 posted 08-10-2010 05:05 PM

Not to get too philosophical, but what came first, the cutting board or the pizza? Did you size the pizza according to your cutting board or did you make the cutting board to fit your pizza? Just an idle question.

-- I'd like to believe Murphy's Law haunts my woodshop, because if it's Karma it would mean I had something to do with it. - K.R.

View Builder_Bob's profile

Builder_Bob

160 posts in 1747 days


#8 posted 08-10-2010 05:17 PM

I sized the pizza “wheel” to accommodate many available pizzas. You can get larger pizzas, but this pizza size is very common. In some thick brands (like Freschetta) this size is too much for the two of us.

Now I wonder about the standardization of pizza sizes in the industry. We have three different brands in the freezer, all exactly the same width. Not only that, but the boxes are all a “press fit” into our side by side freezer/refrigerator. Spooky eh?

-- "The unexpected, when it happens, generally happens when you least expect it."

View degoose's profile

degoose

7038 posts in 2043 days


#9 posted 08-10-2010 10:15 PM

I like the shape and the color combo…
I have several round boards.. they are also great for Nachos… hot plate and all…

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View blakesue08's profile

blakesue08

31 posts in 1634 days


#10 posted 08-10-2010 11:12 PM

what is the best finish to put on a cutting board? and nice pizza board!!

-- Kevin, Virginia

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1738 days


#11 posted 08-10-2010 11:16 PM

Kevin,

There are two main camps on finishing cutting boards:

1. Mineral Oil (as it doesn’t go rancid like vegetable/nut based oils, plus no food allergy concerns), and then some people will also add beeswax in for the last coat or two.

2. Salad Bowl Finish. From my experience, this works the best if you thin it out a lot, I’d go 50-70% mineral spirits to thin it out, especially on the first coat or two, even though it says not to thin it out. The problem is, if you don’t thin it out, you won’t get as good of penetration into the board.

There are other ways, but I’d say those are the two most popular ways to finish a board.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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