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Tritable

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Project by Div posted 08-09-2010 09:02 PM 1444 views 2 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Tritable
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My client wanted 2 small side tables in a contemporary style. Since the house already had some triangular elements, I thought it well to repeat the shape in the tables. The extra shelf not only serves a structural purpose but also allows space for a magazine or two. Credit for the original design must go to Richard Judd.
Another variety, Populus canescens or Grey Polar, can yield some incredible ripple in the grain.

The little tables were done in Poplar. The legs were ebonized with the vinegar/steel wool concoction. I should maybe mention that the Poplar used is not the same species as the American Poplar. This one is known over here as Match Poplar. The Latin name is Populus deltoides. It is not an indigenous tree; I think it originally comes from Europe. In the area where I live, these trees are common along the watercourses and I have harvested many for my sawmill.

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."





14 comments so far

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1863 days


#1 posted 08-09-2010 09:18 PM

Now Now Div. there isn´t any resen for you to be trisectionheaded just becourse you
had to deal with a little MDF the other day
we are still here to soport you and this table ain´t bad and tommorow I´m sure
you will find the last leg before delivery to the costummer
I like the woodcombination and when you have found the legg
you can say well done and make a A+ in your book

best thoughts
Dennis

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 1807 days


#2 posted 08-09-2010 09:19 PM

I like that wood much better than the common Tulip Poplar like we see mostly around the SE US. It is a pretty generic type of wood and generally is not all that interesting.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View wseand's profile

wseand

2605 posts in 1790 days


#3 posted 08-09-2010 09:28 PM

Looking good Div. I really like the design and the choice of woods. No need to gloat on the nice poplar just because ours sucks,LOL.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1689 days


#4 posted 08-09-2010 09:39 PM

Dennis, ha,ha! Actually I didn’t have enough wood to make a 4 leg table. Don’t tell anyone! That frigging MDF thing is still standing in my shop. :^(
Doc, I know your Tulip Polar well, worked in Maryland for a year and had dealings with it.
wseand, thanks bro. Have to gloat on something, you have all the walnut and the spalted maple and the bird’s eye maple and the burls and the biggest chainsaws and, and, and….;^)
Maybe I should start a gloat on some African woods….

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1785 days


#5 posted 08-09-2010 09:39 PM

Neat design. The triangular form has a lot to recommend it. Thanks for posting

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9671 posts in 1837 days


#6 posted 08-09-2010 09:39 PM

Hey,
Thats a elegant little table, like a ballerina on her feet.
I love when the craftsman incorporate the details of the house, or reverse.
It shows a extra insight, that the table was made for a purpose, not just to show off.
You are the man,
best thoughts, and a compliment,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View michelletwo's profile

michelletwo

2290 posts in 1764 days


#7 posted 08-09-2010 10:29 PM

very very nice little light tables

-- We call the destruction of replaceable human made items vandalism, while the destruction of irreplaceable natural resources is called development.

View WoodenFrog's profile

WoodenFrog

2737 posts in 1661 days


#8 posted 08-09-2010 11:26 PM

I like it! Your design is awesome.
Thats a really nice piece.
Thanks for sharing it.

-- Robert B. Sabina, Ohio..... http://www.etsy.com/shop/WoodenfrogWoodenProd

View wseand's profile

wseand

2605 posts in 1790 days


#9 posted 08-10-2010 04:39 AM

I missed the ebonized part that came out looking great. Who knows what I was thinking. We won’t talk about the African woods, it’s just not fair.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View Grant Libramento's profile

Grant Libramento

173 posts in 1728 days


#10 posted 08-10-2010 05:48 AM

Pretty and dainty. I always like three legged furniture. Never any wobbling on an uneven floor!

-- Grant, Tryon, NC

View Cher's profile

Cher

936 posts in 1842 days


#11 posted 08-10-2010 11:39 AM

Div you amaze me, your work is outstanding once again.
The design and choice of woods are excellent.
The workmanship is magnificent.
If I should ever be in your area I am definitely going to come and visit.

Thanks for sharing your amazing work Div.

-- When you know better you do better.

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1689 days


#12 posted 08-10-2010 11:16 PM

Thanks for the compliments, all of you.

Cher, if you don’t, you will be in big trouble! ;^)

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2082 days


#13 posted 08-16-2010 01:07 PM

Very nice table Div. Like Mads said, it’s really a plus when you can build things that fit well with the place they will be used. Personally I like poplar or ‘poppel’ as we call it here. I just cut some out of a couple of pallets that came with my firewood delivery. I didn’t get much from them, but now I can at least make a box or something small with it.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1689 days


#14 posted 08-16-2010 08:46 PM

Thanks Mike! Yes, Poplar can have some amazing figure, depending on the species. Some of it carves nicely too.

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

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