LumberJocks

Walnut and maple breadboard

  • Advertise with us
Project by Jeremymcon posted 12-22-2017 06:35 PM 357 views 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This will be a Christmas gift this year, but after seeing the final project I kind of wish I could keep it!

I don’t own a table saw, but for this project I wish I did. I cut the groove in the end with a plough plane, which was no problem, but the rabbet across the grain were a little tricky. Used a Stanley rabbet plane, scoring the shoulder with a knife every couple passes. It worked, but I did end up planing off a bit if breakout on the edges.

I made 3/8” maple dowels for the pegs. I actually wanted to do 5/16” pegs, but I didn’t have a drill or auger bit that cut clean enough. I attempted to buy new Irwin brand auger bit from Amazon… Ended up ordering 2 of them, and neither worked! I have a vintage one ordered, but it won’t be here until after Christmas.

The holes in the outer tenons are slotted and mortise are oversized to allow expansion of of the board.





9 comments so far

View Steve's profile

Steve

24 posts in 879 days


#1 posted 12-22-2017 06:49 PM

Beautiful work. Super impressed that you did this without a table saw. Did you also hand plane the joints between the glued-up boards?

-- ~Steve

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

211 posts in 549 days


#2 posted 12-22-2017 07:54 PM

Steve – yup! Jointed everything with a jointer plane. I straight-lined the boards and ripped to width on my 14” bandsaw with a fence, so edge jointing basically only required removing the saw marks and taking a little off here and there. Great thing about the thinner boards (4/4) is that I can clamp them together when planing in such a way that if I’m off 90 degrees a little the angles will compliment each other.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1400 posts in 451 days


#3 posted 12-22-2017 08:38 PM

If you haven’t returned the Irwin auger bits to Amazon, I’ve found that if they’re not pulling, check the tip. I had one where the lead screw had part of it folded over and I could fix it pretty quickly with a file. There is also a good guide to sharpening auger bits that also covers lead-screw touch-ups.

Nice galooting on the breadboard!

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

3886 posts in 2135 days


#4 posted 12-22-2017 09:21 PM

Very nice bread board; too bad it will get cut up.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

211 posts in 549 days


#5 posted 12-23-2017 04:05 AM



If you haven t returned the Irwin auger bits to Amazon, I ve found that if they re not pulling, check the tip. I had one where the lead screw had part of it folded over and I could fix it pretty quickly with a file. There is also a good guide to sharpening auger bits that also covers lead-screw touch-ups.

Nice galooting on the breadboard!

- Dave Polaschek

Dave,

What’s galooting? Lol.

I have sharpened vintage auger bits, but these new Irwin bits… I’m not sure if they would work even if I did try to sharpen them. Most auger bits have a bit of a bevel ground into them, but these have a very large bevel that’s approaching 90 degrees! I was also afraid I couldn’t return them if I took a file to them. I’ll take a closer look though and see if I can spot an obvious flaw.

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

211 posts in 549 days


#6 posted 12-23-2017 04:08 AM



Very nice bread board; too bad it will get cut up.

- ralbuck

Thanks! I am actually giving it to member of the family that I expect will probably never use it as a cutting board. She’ll probably use it as a decoration or maybe as a serving platter. But even if it does get cut up I can always sand it down, I suppose…

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1400 posts in 451 days


#7 posted 12-23-2017 12:36 PM

What’s galooting? Lol.

Working entirely with hand tools.

As for sharpening the augers, it may be best to just return them, but I’ve had some new ones where there was something obvious wrong (like a folded bit in the lead screw) that I could fix quickly, so it’s worth taking a look. Then again, I don’t usually worry too much about voids the warranty on tools. I figure I’m learning a new skill. But I also have had the people at Amazon say “don’t bother returning it” a few times, and then I’ve got a free tool to practice on, and if I destroy it, no loss at all.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

29652 posts in 2735 days


#8 posted 12-23-2017 03:16 PM

This cutting board is a wonderful eye catcher. Nice work!

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

211 posts in 549 days


#9 posted 12-25-2017 03:41 PM



What’s galooting? Lol.

Working entirely with hand tools.

- Dave Polaschek

Well I wouldn’t say I use all hand tools. I like to think I have a good mix – 13” lunchbox planer, 14” bandsaw. That combination takes care of a lot of the donkey work. Planes and hand tools for most of the joinery I do though. Bench top lathe helped with the maple dowels. Oh! And I have an orbital sander and a belt sander. Those are handy too!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com