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Hand Planes

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Project by Tomoose posted 08-01-2010 07:14 PM 1720 views 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

OK, so I don’t know anything about the history, types, or proper use of these planes. I got them both from an old farmer’s garage sale for $10 – figured I couldn’t go wrong for 10 bucks. The long one doesnt have a brand on it; it just says “made in USA.” The smaller one says Bailey No. 4 and has patent dates of MAR-25-02, AUG-19-02, and APR 19-10. The blade is marked Stanley Rule & Level CO., New Britain, Conn., USA. These two tools were really beat up and rusty, but a bunch of elbow grease, some black engine enamel, and some glue and they turned out pretty nice. I was able to put a really keen edge on both, and they cut some nice curls. The No. 4 had the big handle craked in half, so I used some Gorilla glue to mend it.

If any of you hand plane collector guys have some info on what type of planes these are, I would appreciate any info you could tell me. For that same group – sorry if I offended anyone by not using proper restoration techniques – I have seen some of the planes you guys have refurbished, and I now realize there are special paint’s etc. that many of you feel are the only way to go. Any tips on when and how to use these would also be appreciated!

Thanks for looking.
Tom

-- cut it twice and it's still too short...





11 comments so far

View DYNO360's profile

DYNO360

147 posts in 1562 days


#1 posted 08-01-2010 07:42 PM

Wow! You did a great job cleaning them up. I really like to see people use and appreciate the older hand tools. If you like woodworking, I’m sure you will enjoy working with them; I love using my old hand planes.

View aurora's profile

aurora

206 posts in 1949 days


#2 posted 08-01-2010 07:48 PM

beautiful planes. the real beauty lies in your work restoring them and then the pleasure you get using them to produce ribbon thin shavings. great job. sometimes you can get info off the blade and other component parts to help you trace the history of your tools.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1812 days


#3 posted 08-01-2010 08:01 PM

realy great users you have made out of some rust :-) they will serve you well if you want
you say there is no mark on the long one
but it does , what do those letters say in the front of the frontknop?
and my gess it´s a nr.5/jack type

Dennis

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3685 posts in 2431 days


#4 posted 08-01-2010 08:26 PM

I’ve never been able to positively identify the generic unmarked planes, except that they are close copies of the standard issues made by Stanley. Visit this awesome site: http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm
if you’re not already familiar with it; other LJ’s have their favorite plane sites as well. I really like restoring the generics, nobody gets testy over your methods of restoring them, and they work just about as well when they’re tuned and ready. I agree with Dennis, the larger one appears to be a (copy of) a Stanley #5.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View mafe's profile

mafe

9573 posts in 1786 days


#5 posted 08-01-2010 08:49 PM

Hi,
What a nice job you have done.
Here are some links:
http://www.handplane.com/
Brilliant:
http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html
Restore guide:
http://www.majorpanic.com/handplane_restor1.htm
Record planes:
http://www.record-planes.com/
Good luck with them,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9573 posts in 1786 days


#6 posted 08-01-2010 08:51 PM

Here found it!!!
http://lumberjocks.com/WayneC/blog/734
Look what Wayne made for all of us – he is a true hero.
And here are a guide to date the once you have:
http://hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/
This might keep you up… Be carefull it can become a expensive, but revarding hobby, it did for me…
Flatten the soles, and sharpen the blades, thats really the most important.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1812 days


#7 posted 08-01-2010 09:13 PM

thank´s for the link Mads that is going to be interresting nightreadings

Dennis

View mafe's profile

mafe

9573 posts in 1786 days


#8 posted 08-01-2010 09:58 PM

You made me take a travel on my computer, and I found several interesting links i had forgotten…
Here are one more:
https://home.comcast.net/~stanleyplanes/planes101/planes101.htm
With a lot of wonderful info…
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Pimzedd's profile

Pimzedd

462 posts in 2501 days


#9 posted 08-01-2010 11:31 PM

Poopiekat’s got the website for Stanley plane information. Patrick’s Blood and Gore site is the best I have found or information about Stanley planes. I’ve learned a lot there.

-- Bill - Mesquite, TX --- "Everything with a power cord eventually winds up in the trash.” John Sarge , timber framer and blacksmith instructor at Tillers International school

View Joe Watson's profile

Joe Watson

315 posts in 2243 days


#10 posted 08-02-2010 05:46 PM

on painting them etc, i wouldn’t worry about that. i rarely restore the planes i get because i plan on using them. I tend to paint them etc and clean rust off sharpen. almost all the planes you can generally tell who made it by the frog lateral lever. Stanley baileys were t shaped, millers falls L shaped(90 degree bend), the unions had a 90 degree twist and sargent had a U shape to the lateral lever.

for instance I have this dunlap i just got it has a L shaped lateral lever which means it was actually made by millers falls, but i have seen dunlaps of other manufacture as well.

http://www.brasscityrecords.com/toolworks/graphics/plane%20id.html

-- Got Wood?

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3685 posts in 2431 days


#11 posted 08-02-2010 06:05 PM

Hey, joe.. good advice about lateral-lever configurations! I’ll be putting my stamped-frog generic in the yard-sale pile too…good info!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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