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Loaf Boards

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Project by splintergroup posted 12-08-2017 03:22 PM 1380 views 5 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Loaf Boards
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I needed some quick product to fill the shelves at the gallery so that was the inspiration behind these.

I made a bunch of them since they are easy to build and with a router template, simple feet can be added to class them up a bit.

Basically a very simple, small, long grain cutting board sized for a loaf of bread. 1” thick, 12” long, 6” wide.

The two shown in the photo are hickory and fumed white oak. The feet are walnut and the finish is a day long soak in a bath of mineral oil.

The feet have a radius on their exposed sides and are cut to wrap around the round-over of the boards body.

A 3/4” round over bit and 3/4” core box bit made this easy!

Thanks for looking and any comments!





14 comments so far

View ScottM's profile (online now)

ScottM

671 posts in 2262 days


#1 posted 12-08-2017 03:30 PM

I like these a lot. For me these wouldn’t be a quick project. Getting those feet to come out that nice would be a disaster!!

View htl's profile

htl

4054 posts in 1275 days


#2 posted 12-08-2017 05:46 PM

Scottm
You could use round feet and use a drill bit to indent them, would be much faster.

One great project ether way it’s done, it has that Green and Green feel to it.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs here on Lumber Jocks.. http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2250 posts in 1338 days


#3 posted 12-08-2017 06:46 PM

Thanks for the comments Scott, htl.

I had a long narrow walnut blank, double the door width, and used the table saw to cut a rabbet along both edges to remove the bulk of the waste. I then ran the long edge (on a router table) against a box core bit with both the edge and top against the router table to get the correct profile. The blank was then halved and chopped into the required foot lengths, then the curve was routed with a template.

The drill bit method would work as well except you would cut the feet to size first, drill the (3/4”) hole with a forester or brad point bit, route the curve, then cut the section out on the TS.

Indeed it seems like a bit faster method if you only need a few feet.

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

4999 posts in 2382 days


#4 posted 12-08-2017 07:44 PM

NICE!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

21106 posts in 3221 days


#5 posted 12-08-2017 09:21 PM

Nice work, Bruce!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3147 posts in 2373 days


#6 posted 12-08-2017 10:18 PM

Splint, nice work and your sales must have been strong. Congratulations!

-- Art

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

6856 posts in 3263 days


#7 posted 12-08-2017 10:47 PM

Great looking loaf boards—should be popular as gifts!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2250 posts in 1338 days


#8 posted 12-08-2017 10:53 PM

Thanks guys!


Splint, nice work and your sales must have been strong. Congratulations!

- AandCstyle


Art:
Yep, sold out.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2738 posts in 1764 days


#9 posted 12-08-2017 10:59 PM

Very stylish, I like!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View AlmostRetired's profile

AlmostRetired

217 posts in 830 days


#10 posted 12-09-2017 07:01 AM

That is a great looking set of boards. Gonna have to add that to the list of projects when I get home from deployment.

You mention an overnight soak in mineral oil. How well does that work out for you? Doe you have to repeat? Is seems that there may be flooding of mineral oil that would “leak” for a few days after. What has your experience been with this process?

View Hawaiilad's profile

Hawaiilad

3252 posts in 3137 days


#11 posted 12-09-2017 07:51 AM

Great idea, I have lots of short thin (1” thick) pieces that would glue up real nice for a project like this. I like the idea of the shown feet as well.

-- Larry in Hawaii,

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2250 posts in 1338 days


#12 posted 12-09-2017 02:16 PM

Thanks again guys!

That is a great looking set of boards. Gonna have to add that to the list of projects when I get home from deployment.

You mention an overnight soak in mineral oil. How well does that work out for you? Doe you have to repeat? Is seems that there may be flooding of mineral oil that would “leak” for a few days after. What has your experience been with this process?

- AlmostRetired

Almost:

I use to just wipe some on then wipe it off after it sat awhile. This worked ok, but with the number I made here that process (usually over 2-3 days) would have jammed up the work area.

The soaking is nice in that I can just plop them into the tub for a day then let them hang over it for another day. Very little excess to wipe up. I give them another quick wipe for any seepage before dropping them off.

Soaking really suits mass production, seems to give better penetration/coverage, and gets the job done with less fuss.
I always leave instructions with each board about needing to periodically refresh the oil.

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

482 posts in 2331 days


#13 posted 12-09-2017 02:42 PM

I really like these. A little bit of extra work really serves to create a differential in the finished product.

I appreciate the factory approach to making the feet. In a way, finding a simple repetitive way to create a piece that looks hand worked is as much a skill as being able to do the hand work.

Nice job.
Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

View AlmostRetired's profile

AlmostRetired

217 posts in 830 days


#14 posted 12-10-2017 07:41 AM

Thanks for the reply. I have been thinking about trying this as I never make less than 3 boards at a time but have read mixed reviews. Gonna have to give it a try next time.


Thanks again guys!

That is a great looking set of boards. Gonna have to add that to the list of projects when I get home from deployment.

You mention an overnight soak in mineral oil. How well does that work out for you? Doe you have to repeat? Is seems that there may be flooding of mineral oil that would “leak” for a few days after. What has your experience been with this process?

- AlmostRetired

Almost:

I use to just wipe some on then wipe it off after it sat awhile. This worked ok, but with the number I made here that process (usually over 2-3 days) would have jammed up the work area.

The soaking is nice in that I can just plop them into the tub for a day then let them hang over it for another day. Very little excess to wipe up. I give them another quick wipe for any seepage before dropping them off.

Soaking really suits mass production, seems to give better penetration/coverage, and gets the job done with less fuss.
I always leave instructions with each board about needing to periodically refresh the oil.

- splintergroup


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