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Lamb's Tongue Gauge

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Project by Ron Aylor posted 12-04-2017 12:31 AM 529 views 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Lamb's Tongue Gauge
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Lamb’s Tongue Gauge -
 
While working in the shop today, I decided to add a chamfer/lamb’s tongue detail to my Reformation Era Prie Dieu. I recently added lark’s tongue stopped chamfers along the stiles and rails around the raised panels.
 
               
 
A lark’s tongue is a simple scoop from the arris to the face of the chamfer. A lamb’s tongue, on the other hand, is an ogee consisting of opposing arcs. The detail I’m looking to achieve will require having to lay-out twenty four quarter inch ogees. I decided I needed a template or gauge.
 
I tried to find a few scraps of wood (12:46 PM) …
 

 
… once found … I cut out a body 7/8” x 1-1/4” x 2-1/4” (12:53 PM) …
 
               
 
… laid out opposing 1/4” radius arcs on 1/8” thick pine (1:21 PM) ...
 
               
 
… cut 1/8” channel in the end of the body … inserted shaped pine piece … secured with pins (1:43 PM) ...
 
               
 
… and … voilà (2:10 PM) ... a Lamb’s Tongue Gauge for 1/4” chamfers.
 
               
 
Keep an eye on my blog … Fr. Chad's Prie Dieu … to see this little guy in use, soon. Thanks for looking!
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.





6 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1193 posts in 418 days


#1 posted 12-04-2017 01:04 AM

And now I know the difference between a larks tongue and a lambs tongue! Thanks again, Ron!

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View franktha4th's profile

franktha4th

34 posts in 10 days


#2 posted 12-04-2017 01:06 AM

very nice project!

-- Frank, Washington State, https://www.youtube.com/user/franktha4th

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

11190 posts in 2704 days


#3 posted 12-04-2017 08:42 AM

Realy nice ’’touch’’!

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1777 posts in 484 days


#4 posted 12-06-2017 01:37 PM

Thanks, guys! I made another version of this gauge with four different sizes … 1/4”, 3/8”, 1/2”, and 3/4”. Check it out here! Thanks, again.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2516 posts in 2027 days


#5 posted 12-07-2017 02:44 AM

Lark’s tongue, very interesting. This is the first I’ve encountered this, and I must say that it adds a nice touch to the rails and stiles around the panels. Provides a great “hand made” quality to the piece, think I’m going to have to incorporate this on a future project.

But this blog was about the lamb’s tongue gauge: good idea to make such a gauge, to ensure consistent results with all such features in this Prie Dieu. Looking forward to seeing it in action.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1777 posts in 484 days


#6 posted 12-07-2017 12:40 PM



Lark’s tongue, very interesting. This is the first I’ve encountered this, and I must say that it adds a nice touch to the rails and stiles around the panels. Provides a great “hand made” quality to the piece, think I’m going to have to incorporate this on a future project.

But this blog was about the lamb’s tongue gauge: good idea to make such a gauge, to ensure consistent results with all such features in this Prie Dieu. Looking forward to seeing it in action.

- Oldtool

Thanks, Tom. Typically, the lark’s tongue is a simple scoop from the arris to the face of the chamfer. I got this variation from Peter Follansbee, the king of 17th century furniture. In one of his blogs, Peter mentions that the lamb’s tongue doesn’t “go” on a rail with panels. The lamb’s tongue is seen most often vertically along the edges of cabinets and legs.
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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