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Wood Smoker

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Project by Chiromade posted 11-16-2017 05:48 PM 842 views 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Had an old Weber propane table top BBQ that stopped working, so I reused most of the parts off of it after I cleaned it all up. The burning unit and kettle I used for the smoking box which sets into the base of the smoker.
Pretty simple box around BBQ with shelving and meat hooks inside for various types of smoking. Have 2 regulators on it so I keep the temperature under 200 degrees to avoid anything catching on fire. No glue or sealants anywhere on inside in hopes of avoiding toxic off-gas, so far so good:)
I have done up to 21 pounds of jerky in this bad boy at one time

-- 1 Thes. 4:11





8 comments so far

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2589 posts in 2353 days


#1 posted 11-16-2017 06:07 PM

I don’t know what to say…a wood smoker made of wood. I would think after time, the shelves will get gummed up. I know my smoker has a really nice coating of creosote inside.
Very ingenious!

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View Chiromade's profile

Chiromade

35 posts in 1306 days


#2 posted 11-16-2017 06:20 PM

Ya all the shelves get that nice sticky coating, but thank goodness I take them out every time after each use and scrub them with soap and water. I also looked up all the combustion temperatures and charring temperatures of each type of wood used and the lowest was 450 degrees, so I figured as long as I keep it around the 170-200 degrees for smoking, all the hard work won’t go up in smoke, so to speak!

-- 1 Thes. 4:11

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3935 days


#3 posted 11-16-2017 06:28 PM

Looks like a good plan. How do you control the temperature?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View pottz's profile

pottz

2230 posts in 822 days


#4 posted 11-16-2017 06:56 PM

Ya all the shelves get that nice sticky coating, but thank goodness I take them out every time after each use and scrub them with soap and water.
-chiromade.

sacralidge! you never clean a smoker,thats where the real flavor develops over time.you dont even put meat in a smoker until youve burned a few hours worth of wood in one.i guess if your just doing jerky maybe?good luck with it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View LesB's profile (online now)

LesB

1359 posts in 3281 days


#5 posted 11-16-2017 07:03 PM

Very nice construction. The use of propane for heat does concern me a bit. I would keep it well away from any structures and a charged garden hose handy. I too wonder about a thermostat control.

For many years I used a “wood” dryer/smoker box. The heat source was an ceramic “cone” electric heating element with a light bulb screw in base that went into a ceramic light bulb fixture in the bottom of the box. (just Google “ceramic cone heater” to find them, they look like an ice cream cone with heating coils). I think you could also use an electric “hot plate”. The thermostat was a single pole electric hot water heater type. The range of settings on the thermostat , 90 to 150 degrees, was just right for the job. I placed a metal can with holes punched in the bottom on top of the cone to hold wood chips when I smoked fish or meat.
The removable shelves were made from aluminum window screen framing with fiberglass screen; all available at hardware stores. The screen was easy to replace if it got dirty (which it did when I smoked fish and meat)
It also functioned well as a dehydrator for fruit and nuts.

-- Les B, Oregon

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

578 posts in 218 days


#6 posted 11-18-2017 09:35 AM

Nice work… I think its called a COLD SMOKER! I have seen chefs use a cardboard box to smoke meats

-- β€œIn a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View LesB's profile (online now)

LesB

1359 posts in 3281 days


#7 posted 11-18-2017 06:44 PM


Nice work… I think its called a COLD SMOKER! I have seen chefs use a cardboard box to smoke meats

- richardchaos

I think a “cold Smoker” is when the smoke is created in a chamber at side of the main box. The cooled smoke is then piped into the smoke box. The contents never reach “cooking” temperature which is above 140 degrees F. Cold smoking adds flavor is often followed with some sort of cooking process.
Elizabeth Karmel, author of Taming the Flame: Secrets for Hot-and-Quick Grilling and Low-and-Slow BBQ, a cold smoke lies between 90 and 120 degrees Fahrenheit. Bacteria breed fast at temperatures under 140, so hot smoking is generally understood to lie between 165 and 185 degrees Fahrenheit

-- Les B, Oregon

View pottz's profile

pottz

2230 posts in 822 days


#8 posted 11-19-2017 12:46 AM

lesb you are correct,this would still be considered a hoy smoker.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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