LumberJocks

Gear Shift Knobs

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Project by Lazyman posted 11-02-2017 03:44 AM 863 views 5 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A buddy of mine is rebuilding an old 60’s chevy pickup truck. I recently saw a YouTube video about making gear shift knobs so I decide to make one for my friend. I was looking for an interesting design and stumbled upon a turned vase by Malcom J. Tibbetts and decided to emulate it.

I first made a prototype out of scrap pine laying around ( last 2 photos). It is finished some GF black cherry stain and a friction finish. The final knob is walnut and hard maple and has about 7 or 8 layers of CA finish. These are fun to make and I have some ideas for other interesting designs. Turned shift knobs might be good sellers for you craft show sellers. My friends gear shift lever uses 3/8-16 thread so I used a threaded insert to make mounting easy.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.





12 comments so far

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Rick_M

10641 posts in 2219 days


#1 posted 11-02-2017 03:47 AM

That is cool looking.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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jeffswildwood

2574 posts in 1817 days


#2 posted 11-02-2017 11:59 AM

These are nice! For a truck restoration it would be perfect. Your right, It may be a good seller at a craft fair.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

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HokieKen

4515 posts in 978 days


#3 posted 11-02-2017 12:22 PM

I’d put it in my truck in a heartbeat! That walnut and maple is a favorite combination of mine. I love that lamination. I’ll be copying it for something in the future ;-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Kilo19

57 posts in 65 days


#4 posted 11-02-2017 02:06 PM

Great idea. I’ll have to save that away if I ever get a lathe. Great work.

-- Justin

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PaulDoug

1405 posts in 1543 days


#5 posted 11-02-2017 03:37 PM

Certainly makes for a beautiful knob. Way back in my high school days we use to make knobs in Art shop (usually out of some forum of plastic), to put on our “speed shift” conversion we use to make in Machine Shop, to convert from column shift to a floor shift. Installed the conversion in Auto Shop.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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ralbuck

3726 posts in 2106 days


#6 posted 11-02-2017 04:09 PM

Well designed and made. Now the rest of the interior is going to have to be UPGRADED!

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

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Mainiac Matt

7464 posts in 2168 days


#7 posted 11-02-2017 07:45 PM

How do you guys even think this stuff up?

very cool!

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Dustin

408 posts in 580 days


#8 posted 11-02-2017 07:47 PM

Beautiful! Love that tapered layering!

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1508 posts in 1227 days


#9 posted 11-03-2017 10:41 AM

Thanks for the kind words. I’ve got a bunch of different ideas for other designs, all of which are shameless imitations of other people’s designs for bowls and other turned projects.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

11229 posts in 2707 days


#10 posted 11-03-2017 05:11 PM

So cool, very unique!

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

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ron53

1 post in 1783 days


#11 posted 11-06-2017 02:52 AM

Lazyman- very cool design!! I’ve been studying the pictures you posted showing the glued-up laminations. Any chance you would post a bit more detail on the laminations? especially how you get them so precise

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1508 posts in 1227 days


#12 posted 11-06-2017 12:55 PM



Lazyman- very cool design!! I ve been studying the pictures you posted showing the glued-up laminations. Any chance you would post a bit more detail on the laminations? especially how you get them so precise

- ron53

Thanks and Sure. The precision actually comes from final trimming after the first glue up.
- I started with a 3/4” x about 3” piece of walnut and similar size piece of maple. I think that they were a little over 2 feet long. You’ll need to determine how tall and wide for the block you want and allow for a little trimming and saw kerfs. The maple can start a little narrower since the final width only needs to be about 75% of the width of the walnut.
- I resawed the Walnut to about 3/8” on my table saw with the blade tilted about 6 degrees. The 3/8” thickness is on the thicker edge after resawing. You can obviously make these a little thicker if you want. Note that a zero clearance insert is a good idea for cutting strips this thin.
- I similarly resawed the maple with the same 6 degree tilt but adjusted the fence to cut a thinner wedge so the top edge tapers completely.
- First glue up: glue the thin wedge (maple) with the narrow edge pointed towards the thicker edge of the walnut so that it overlaps about 75% of the walnut—a little more is okay. It is ok if the thicker edge of the maple piece overlaps the thin edge of the walnut. You will clean that up in the next step. Note that my saw blade leaves a glue ready surface. If yours doesn’t or you use a bandsaw to resaw, you will need to sand it smooth before glue up (and allow for the lose of thickness). Use lots of clamps.
TIP: If you find that the wedges won’t stay in place as you clamp it down because of the wedge shape, sprinkle a few grains of salt along one glue surface—it doesn’t take much. The salt helps prevent the wet, slick glue from slipping and doesn’t hurt the joint at all.
- Once the glue has set (30-60 min), put the blade back to 90 degrees and rip the overlapping maple edge off so that it is square to the walnut side of the board.
- With the blade still at 90, put the board on edge as if to resaw and trim the maple side of the board flush so that both sides of the board are parallel and flat. You are only trimming off enough to make the maple side perfectly flat.
- Cross cut the board into squares. Because of the trimming they may be a little narrower than you started so measure.
- Stack the squares so that they are all aligned the same way and then flip over every other one and glue them into a block that looks like the 3rd picture above.

Voila! I tend to get a little verbose and it makes sense in MY head but let me know if anything needs more explanation.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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