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The Finders/Pickers Kerosene Lamp

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Project by richardchaos posted 10-29-2017 05:13 PM 445 views 2 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have anew client that loves my steampunk lamps but wanted something more Country. She handed me two 2 gal old Kerosene cans and said MAKE LAMPS.

This is one of them. Them have wood on the bottom and may be put on a wood pedestal…

I was wondering what to use as a lamp shade and a rotary knob ornament. The knob thingy could be be very heavy or large but light and in proper proportions.

I was wondering around in Hobby Lobby and found the exact thing. They had pack of five of their small cast aluminum Water gate valve handles. SO I epoxied in a small rotary with in the end of the spout and epoxied on the water valve handle.

he shade was a Hobby Lobby find as well I was torn between about 5-6 different available shades but settled this one for one it needed no faux aging or weathering.

The other grey can still had its lid the red one did not so I made one out of a 1 1/2 PVC cap and weathered it and rusted it up

AS for all my work it i.e. WWWAAAAYYYYY over enginerreed.

PLEASE ENJOY

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell





4 comments so far

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2551 posts in 2331 days


#1 posted 10-30-2017 12:11 PM

I thought about lamps for quite a while. Thought I had a lot of good ideas. Then, one day while discussing it with one of my gallery managers, he told me that they had been informed by their insurance carrier that since the lamps they had in the gallery, (handmade by artisans like yourself), did not have the UL approval, they were liable for any and all accidents that might occur with the lamps, like a short, shocking the user, fires, etc. Cradle to grave. The gallery manager called UL, and they confirmed that if the lamps did not have approval numbers based on a finished product, no go. They had notified the two remaining artists that they had to come pick up their lamps. And the one guy was really good, with reclaimed wood, hand-hammered copper shades, etc.

I looked into it further, and it is crazy expensive to get them approved, and no, using a UL approved light socket/switch combo in your lamp does not give it a UL number. They approve each and every model as a finished product. I went to Walmart and started looking at their lamps. Every model had its own number. So I gave up on lamps. Some people have told me that if you give them as gifts it is OK, but reading the rules of UL, that is not so. You are responsible for the product, start to finish, no matter who is using it. Apparently they are serious about people around electricity.
I know it sounds rough and stupid, and it somewhat is, (I believe UL is somewhat of a racket), but UL is there and I know I won’t make lamps because of it.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

429 posts in 196 days


#2 posted 10-30-2017 05:31 PM

Welcome to your brave, free amerika. I can attest that all of my wire connection are double or triple insulated. I solder every connection and heat shrink insulation every one at least 2 times sometimes three. Every place a wire touches any metal such as a Hole drilled for a penetration gets extra love.

If any of my works has an issue with electrify I can assure everyone it was the parts we are all forced to live with that were made in China.

If you think the UL is a crooked racket its a good thing you don’t manufacture foods or drugs! That it text book Gestapo, MOB shit there.

Its all corrupt from top to bottom.


I thought about lamps for quite a while. Thought I had a lot of good ideas. Then, one day while discussing it with one of my gallery managers, he told me that they had been informed by their insurance carrier that since the lamps they had in the gallery, (handmade by artisans like yourself), did not have the UL approval, they were liable for any and all accidents that might occur with the lamps, like a short, shocking the user, fires, etc. Cradle to grave. The gallery manager called UL, and they confirmed that if the lamps did not have approval numbers based on a finished product, no go. They had notified the two remaining artists that they had to come pick up their lamps. And the one guy was really good, with reclaimed wood, hand-hammered copper shades, etc.

I looked into it further, and it is crazy expensive to get them approved, and no, using a UL approved light socket/switch combo in your lamp does not give it a UL number. They approve each and every model as a finished product. I went to Walmart and started looking at their lamps. Every model had its own number. So I gave up on lamps. Some people have told me that if you give them as gifts it is OK, but reading the rules of UL, that is not so. You are responsible for the product, start to finish, no matter who is using it. Apparently they are serious about people around electricity.
I know it sounds rough and stupid, and it somewhat is, (I believe UL is somewhat of a racket), but UL is there and I know I won t make lamps because of it.

- Tennessee

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View mikeacg's profile

mikeacg

313 posts in 874 days


#3 posted 10-31-2017 12:39 PM

I ran into this mess in the past. I was hoping to do some Craftsman style wooden lamps but once I saw the money involved (and it is an annual fee for each iteration) I decided to let it pass. I do think that there might be a way to offer a battery-powered product (that would leave the UL people out of the equation and that the customer could convert to electric) but haven’t had the time to spend doing the research.
I do like the work you have done, regardless! Thanks for sharing!

-- Mike, A Yooper with a drawl, http://www.artcentergraphics.com

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2551 posts in 2331 days


#4 posted 11-09-2017 06:25 PM

richardchaos you can attest all you want to your quality, but if for some reason, say someone puts a great strain on the cord and separates the insulation from the wire, and it results in a shock, fire, etc., you are liable. As you can see by Mike’s answer, I am not the only one to go down this messy road.

Find something non-electrical to build, save yourself some sleep.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

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