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Counter height kitchen table

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Project by MrFid posted 10-02-2017 05:22 PM 749 views 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I made this table for a friend (my father’s coworker) who had replaced his kitchen and was looking for a table that he could sit at as well as move around the kitchen. This was the first piece of woodworking of mine that I have directly built for someone, and it was fun and interesting to have that dynamic.

The table is cherry on top, and the legs are painted with gray milk paint. The legs and aprons are poplar, glued up from stock that I jointed and planed down to approx 7/8” thickness. The legs and aprons are joined with mortise and tenon joinery. I used a nice long 1.5 inch tenon to assure strength and rigidity of the joint. The legs are tapered from 2.5 inches down to about 1.75 at the bottom. The tabletop is glued up of five pieces of cherry.

The top was finished with one coat of BLO, 3 or 4 coats of polyurethane, and finished with paste wax. The poly coats were fairly thin as I didn’t want it to feel like a piece of plastic on top. The base also got a coat of polyurethane (matte finish on that though, satin on top) to avoid any issues. I read that milk paint can stain/streak if it gets wet if you don’t seal it. By far the steepest learning curve I faced was working with the milk paint. Unlike any finish I’ve used before. I was incredibly frustrated with the paint at first, but I learned how to apply it better and I’d only balk slightly if asked to use it again. :)

I quoted him about 4-6 weeks and was done around 6 weeks after I started.

Thanks for looking and if you have any questions, comments, feedback, or criticism please let me know.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.





8 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13751 posts in 3913 days


#1 posted 10-02-2017 05:23 PM

Very nice table. It matches the kitchen well.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View XrayJay's profile

XrayJay

229 posts in 1795 days


#2 posted 10-02-2017 05:42 PM

Beautiful table, the contrast between the cherry top vs. the painted base really adds to the look of the table. MrFid, I’ve never used milk paint, what was the problem with it?

-- Whatever you find to do with your hands, do it with all your might,... because there is no work in the grave...Ecclesiastes 9:10

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

1179 posts in 1383 days


#3 posted 10-02-2017 05:59 PM

very nice table you did a great job. I like the wood choices both are good to work with. Congratulations!

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View PaxJen's profile

PaxJen

37 posts in 473 days


#4 posted 10-02-2017 06:09 PM

I like it!

-- May you build a ladder to the stars and climb on every rung . . .

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

28797 posts in 2683 days


#5 posted 10-02-2017 06:53 PM

This table is a very nice piece and it really looks nice in that kitchen. That floor really sets it off!

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

855 posts in 1720 days


#6 posted 10-02-2017 07:14 PM



Beautiful table, the contrast between the cherry top vs. the painted base really adds to the look of the table. MrFid, I ve never used milk paint, what was the problem with it?

- XrayJay

Thanks all for the comments! I appreciate everyone’s words of encouragement.

@XrayJay I found it very different than any other paint I’ve ever used (admittedly, it’s either latex or acrylic so fr for me.) It requires near-constant stirring while in use to maintain consistency. I stirred every time I dipped my brush. I used a cheap one-time chip brush each time as I was instructed by the internet.
Further, even with shaking the can to mix it (with a marble in there acting as an agitator), I still ended up with unblended specks of black. Which, when brushed on, produce streaks.The best way to get rid of them is to run the brush back and forth and across over the streak until it blends in, but it was a bit arduous to get a good finish. I figured out how to deal with the streaks on the second coat, but on the first coat it looked pretty rough. Also, be careful to avoid too thick a coat else you end up with chipping paint. This looks sorta cool and vintage but wasn’t what I was going for in this project. I ended up having to sand off chipping paint on most coats from the places where the paint started to drip. I am admittedly not much of a finisher though.
Lastly, I found that when I applied paint from one batch, then put it in the fridge, and later applied more from the same batch on different parts I ended up with two slightly different colors. BTW I was told to store it in the fridge so that it doesn’t go bad (made from milk proteins), and don’t mix more than you’ll use in a 24 hr period.

All that aside, I was really pleased with the look of the final paint job. I also learned how magical latex paint is from this project haha!

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

855 posts in 1720 days


#7 posted 10-02-2017 07:15 PM



This table is a very nice piece and it really looks nice in that kitchen. That floor really sets it off!

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

- helluvawreck

Yes I agree. I didn’t do the floor (or any other part of the kitchen) but I really like the look of it.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View XrayJay's profile

XrayJay

229 posts in 1795 days


#8 posted 10-02-2017 08:56 PM

Thanks for the info!!

Beautiful table, the contrast between the cherry top vs. the painted base really adds to the look of the table. MrFid, I ve never used milk paint, what was the problem with it?

- XrayJay

Thanks all for the comments! I appreciate everyone s words of encouragement.

@XrayJay I found it very different than any other paint I ve ever used (admittedly, it s either latex or acrylic so fr for me.) It requires near-constant stirring while in use to maintain consistency. I stirred every time I dipped my brush. I used a cheap one-time chip brush each time as I was instructed by the internet.
Further, even with shaking the can to mix it (with a marble in there acting as an agitator), I still ended up with unblended specks of black. Which, when brushed on, produce streaks.The best way to get rid of them is to run the brush back and forth and across over the streak until it blends in, but it was a bit arduous to get a good finish. I figured out how to deal with the streaks on the second coat, but on the first coat it looked pretty rough. Also, be careful to avoid too thick a coat else you end up with chipping paint. This looks sorta cool and vintage but wasn t what I was going for in this project. I ended up having to sand off chipping paint on most coats from the places where the paint started to drip. I am admittedly not much of a finisher though.
Lastly, I found that when I applied paint from one batch, then put it in the fridge, and later applied more from the same batch on different parts I ended up with two slightly different colors. BTW I was told to store it in the fridge so that it doesn t go bad (made from milk proteins), and don t mix more than you ll use in a 24 hr period.

All that aside, I was really pleased with the look of the final paint job. I also learned how magical latex paint is from this project haha!

- MrFid


-- Whatever you find to do with your hands, do it with all your might,... because there is no work in the grave...Ecclesiastes 9:10

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