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Closet Shelves/Cabinets

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Project by Hazem posted 09-29-2017 12:40 PM 417 views 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Long time lurker. First time posting.

Needed to replace the wire shelves in my kids’ closet. Built this out of maple ply and solid mahogany for trim. It came out ok, but not great. Kids and wife are very happy with it but I see are the mistakes.

This was my first time spraying lacquer. I definitely need more practice. The parts that were sprayed well look really good. This will be my go to finish from now on. Big thanks to James from Kings Fine Woodworking for all his help.

Could not get the cabinets perfectly square no matter how hard I tried. So they don’t line up properly. Any advice on squaring a cabinet this big?

Feedback welcome.

God bless.





5 comments so far

View psully's profile

psully

27 posts in 117 days


#1 posted 09-30-2017 12:31 AM

Hazem, welcome to the site, congrats on your first project. The cabinet looks good.
For squaring up large cabinets I like to lay them out on a packing blanket and I use pipe clamps set to exactly the same measurement to control the side to side movement, I will calculate the hypotenuse for the cross measurements and then fasten… if there are any gaps after that just tell folks the wall isn’t square !

View MC's profile

MC

197 posts in 2182 days


#2 posted 09-30-2017 10:14 AM

The cabinets look great and you should be proud of your work. As the builder you are aware of every mistake that most observers will never see.

View Hazem's profile

Hazem

85 posts in 1083 days


#3 posted 10-01-2017 06:02 AM

Gentlemen,

Thank you both for your comments. I appreciate the feedback and kind words.

Hazem

View Rarebreed68's profile

Rarebreed68

101 posts in 136 days


#4 posted 10-01-2017 11:13 AM

I always try to inset the cabinet back in a rabbet if possible. I also dado my face frames so that they capture the sides. By allowing the face frame to extend 1/4” past the cabinet side, it makes it easier to clamp the face frames tight and flush to each other.

While the clamps are in place, pilot drill, and screw the frames together. If you use a pilot bit with a countersink, you will be able to plug the holes after the screws are in place.

Where the cabinet meets the wall, you have a choice of making the face frame overhang the sides enough to allow scribing it to the wall, or you can create a small piece of trim to nail on the face of the cabinet that closes any gap you may have to the wall on each side.

Typically I use 1/4” thick by 5/8” or 3/4” wide, with a slight roundover on one edge.

The cabinets look nice, and your “customers” are happy, so you may be lucky enough to justify getting some new tools lol.

-- EARTH FIRST! We'll log the other planets later. Trust your neighbors, but brand your calves. Opinion worth price charged.

View Hazem's profile

Hazem

85 posts in 1083 days


#5 posted 10-01-2017 05:32 PM

Thanks Rarebreed. I’ll try insetting the back next time. That sounds like a good idea. And I’ll do my best to get some new tools out of this :-)


I always try to inset the cabinet back in a rabbet if possible. I also dado my face frames so that they capture the sides. By allowing the face frame to extend 1/4” past the cabinet side, it makes it easier to clamp the face frames tight and flush to each other.

While the clamps are in place, pilot drill, and screw the frames together. If you use a pilot bit with a countersink, you will be able to plug the holes after the screws are in place.

Where the cabinet meets the wall, you have a choice of making the face frame overhang the sides enough to allow scribing it to the wall, or you can create a small piece of trim to nail on the face of the cabinet that closes any gap you may have to the wall on each side.

Typically I use 1/4” thick by 5/8” or 3/4” wide, with a slight roundover on one edge.

The cabinets look nice, and your “customers” are happy, so you may be lucky enough to justify getting some new tools lol.

- Rarebreed68


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