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Holesawing with ease and without the tears.

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Project by LittleBlackDuck posted 09-24-2017 08:24 AM 2138 views 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Right from the start, I would like to fess up that this is no way my idea. It was plagiarised from keifer (aka Klaus).

I only put his concept into practice just a few days ago and was so impressed that I have spruiked it at every opportunity.

As I was preparing a reply to another project post with the intention of making a reference to the above, I vaguely remembered a covering video (which I hope I’m correct in saying was also by keifer). I tried like hell to find it but couldn’t and rather than succumbing to any further reading in trying to find it, I thought a couple of pictures would be easier.

Well the duck got carried away and took more photos than there was film in his camera.

Armed with all these “G” rated photos, I thought that as there’s many a posts about cutting boards, another post about holesaws may not be overboard. Furthermore, there may be newbies here at LJ that hate reading as much as I do and have not been exposed to all of kiefer’s vintage presentations in their research backlog.

Two more disclaimers:
  1. I only used drill press(es) and did not try a hand held.
  2. My primary drill press has great torque under low speed and high load.

I picked a new 111mm holesaw as I could not find my 110mm (which was hiding behind the 112mm one). Once mounted I cut 2 shallow kerfs to demonstrate internal and external circles (pic #3). Went over to my tabletop press and drilled 3/4” forstner bit holes just kissing the outside of the kerf (actually didn’t kiss… just met it half way and then simply held hands), pic #4.

Back at the biggie press I started drilling the inside circle (at 150RPM) first… only because I could see the relief hole fill up with saw dust (pic #5). At that speed, the process using the 111mm saw took about 30secs (single pass… give or take a few minutes). I will add that the circle/plug was still a bit too squeezy to extract, however, it should be a tad easier as there was no build up of burnt resin/sawdust on the inside of the saw (more on this further on). Now I do recall that the presenter of that phantom video, demonstrated a neat way of popping out the plugs which I have managed to unintentionally forget… so no pass-on with that snippet…

Hit the other circle and that executed just as quickly and successfully. I will add here that there was absolutely no residual build-up on the saw and no telltale smoking during the process. This picture demonstrates the state of the saw after 2 cuts with no preliminary clean up,



The following are the resultant hole and circle in their respective transformation stage:
Entry side,

Exit side,

Exit side lightly hand sanded,

I then put a girdle on the holesaw and shrunk it down to a slim 41mm. I bypassed my 40mm aw as it had a lot of “pre-new-technique” uncleaned build-up. Rather than waste timber I took one of the previous plugs and after the relief hole, ran the cut on my low-end tabletop drill at a neat and even 507RPM.
To undertake the process with a more traditional approach I tried the circle with two passes… 1/2 through, flip and the rest from other side.

It may have been the holesaw, play in the cheap press or just bad woodworking practices, I was not impressed with the seam that I have found tends to be associated with the two pass method,

(small wheel compared to the one pass large one).

I then decided to repeat the small wheel, however, this time I cut the relief hole using the scroll saw… which is another option if layout may prevent the use of a forstner bit… a forstner bit is easier, however, the relief hole can be any shape or size as long as you don’t allow too much sawdust buildup in it

Again no resin build up on the saw (ran at 900RPM… forgot to change speed),

The single pass (small on right with light exit side hand sand) was much neater than the two pass next to it,

I was more than satisfied with the results from both single pass executions.

I would recommend the single pass method and to eliminate tearout on the exit side ensure you have a good, unblemished flat surface (not a well used sacrificial drilling board) and endure the outer piece cannot lift up on exit.

As promised I will mention how I eject the plugs from the saw seeing I have forgotten the other method (remember the talk about the phantom video) and screwdrivers through the slot tends to damage the plugs which is not desirable if it is the hero piece.

The plug was cut using a 75mm holesaw at 900RPM.

I made one of these simple jigs using 1/4” dowel,

Note the two holes for the saws connector plugs… I cut the dowels too short and here in Australia 1/4” dowels is in scarce supply.
Position the saw with the plug over the dowels and with slight pressure using a steel rod (coat hanger piece) the plug ejection is easily started. As there is no resin build up inside the saw, once the plug starts to move there should be enough outhang to easily remove.

Again notice the cleanliness inside,

With gentle rubbing between the thumb and forefinger (unless you have dexterous toes) the residual sawdust and wood chips are easily removed leaving a clean saw blade ready to be put away.

One thing I will leave this exercise with is…. you have a greater drilling speed tolerance and there is no need to clean any bloody resin off the holesaw after use. OK… two things… Hey ducks can’t count.. they don’t have toes just webs (and long before the Internet was invented… so don’t call me backward).

Sorry all, I wanted to make a video but unfortunately my legs are not shapely enough and the missus wont let me show my face.

Addendum:
Fortunately keifer read this article and generously offered a link to the phantom video I was referring to. He must have been much younger then, as he had the time to write his longer unabbreviated name of woodkiefer1 on YouTube (no wonder I couldn’t find it here at LJ). Anyway, before you read the next paragraph and take the appropriate action, I have retrospectively included the link to that phantom video here... <- click on the blue text, well worth the watch (better than reading all the above).

And as always, if you already know this and/or find it boring… stop reading any further!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD





17 comments so far

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4297 posts in 1984 days


#1 posted 09-24-2017 09:09 AM

Oh yes I saw the demonstration by Kiefer some time ago, and can only agree it certainly makes the cutting easier on both the results and the holesaw. I made a Glue pot today but forgot to try it out.

Instead I held a small wire brush in one hand and incrementally cut the holes.
The wood residue build up still happens even with wire brushing the holesaw and post clean up is still required.

I may try this method tomorrow but I have no resivations that it actually works.

-- Regards Robert

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1215 posts in 601 days


#2 posted 09-24-2017 09:28 AM


I may try this method tomorrow but I have no resivations that it actually works.

- robscastle


I don’t mind spruiking a good idea and while it may not be obvious, this post was a tribute to keifer.

I can guarantee you will be amazed at how cleanly and quickly it cuts. You’ll be able to dedicate your wire brushes to cleaning toe nails and post clean up to the 3 legged salute, in the future.

One word of advice (here we go again… more than one word), make sure you remove any existing built up resin first… or at least make your test cut with your cleanest saw.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

2328 posts in 2063 days


#3 posted 09-24-2017 11:36 AM

Repeat repeat , everyone needs to know this. I have been telling as many people as I come in contact with.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2791 posts in 1769 days


#4 posted 09-24-2017 11:43 AM

An entertaining review of a great technique.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1215 posts in 601 days


#5 posted 09-24-2017 11:50 AM


Repeat repeat , everyone needs to know this. I have been telling as many people as I come in contact with.

- bushmaster


Thanks for the support b’m’ and R’o’49. While keifer’s post (where I drew inspiration) stands immortalised, unfortunately too many oldie and newbie (not age but rather membership length) may have missed it and/or never become aware of it. It’s so simple yet so affective.

Some of these simple gems need continual spruiking.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

5528 posts in 2447 days


#6 posted 09-24-2017 02:26 PM

Thanks for the plug (mention) Duck
Here is the link to the video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jR0cMNVjSMc

This is the link to my original LJ post
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/261330
Good post and I hope this helps others !

Klaus

-- Kiefer https://www.youtube.com/user/woodkiefer1/videos

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

19289 posts in 2886 days


#7 posted 09-24-2017 04:19 PM

Good tip. I’ll remember that.

Thanks, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View pottz's profile

pottz

1987 posts in 765 days


#8 posted 09-24-2017 08:41 PM

I missed this when Klaus originally posted so thanks duck for revisting this very simple yet very effective procedure.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1215 posts in 601 days


#9 posted 09-24-2017 09:42 PM



....Thanks for the plug (mention) Duck …..

Klaus

- kiefer



I missed this when Klaus originally posted so thanks duck for revisting this very simple yet very effective procedure.

- pottz

k, it was a pleasure to further advertise your hint. As the old ad used to say… ”When you’re on a good thing, stick to it”.

pottzy, When I was going to suggest the original link in another post, I assumed that there may be many more viewers that may have missed the original post just like you. A link there would also be lost to all the non-subscribers to that post and only by posting a new project that it could get more exposure.

I personally have struggled with hole saws, be it too fast a speed, too much force, not enough saw lifting, using uncleaned saw or just sheer stupidity… this concept was just too good not to (re-)share.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View crowie's profile

crowie

1955 posts in 1731 days


#10 posted 09-24-2017 11:05 PM

Thank you Alex for the article…
Just a thought…For Aussie hardwoods I use T/C Holesaws…

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1215 posts in 601 days


#11 posted 09-24-2017 11:28 PM


...For Aussie hardwoods I use T/C Holesaws…

Damn you people north of the border crowie. I just can get any good hardwood that will cut my T/C down here in the south.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1604 posts in 2645 days


#12 posted 09-24-2017 11:43 PM

I tried this method with a really really cheap 3” Black and Decker hole saw and the cut it produced looked great, better than a $40 hole saw not using this technique.

View htl's profile

htl

2968 posts in 940 days


#13 posted 09-25-2017 02:48 AM

!!And as always, if you already know this and/or find it boring… stop reading any further!!

My goodness Ducky a great tip but next time put the IF YOU ALREADY KNOW at the front of the post for us non readers!!! LOL!!!!!

I like to use this tip when cutting out wheels and have a bunch of them to cut out.
Drill out one wheel then start the next one just over the edge of the last hole this way you get the clearance you need for a fast clean hole.

Works great up close to the fence to help keep the wood from getting out of control.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4297 posts in 1984 days


#14 posted 10-01-2017 11:59 PM

Well its a bit later than (tomorrow) but never the less I got round to testing out the method.

I cut five holes in some scrap Swamp Gum.

Here is the initial setup:

Note the following,
1. looking closely you can see that the holesaw overlaps the next hole and or the edge of the wood without encroaching into it, so its the “wheels” we want in this case. (as per HTL’s method) This allows sawdust to spill out of the cutting area.
2. This first cut was done with the pilot drill in place although backed out slightly, The photo actually shows the drill removed.

Now I cut the wheels in two passes as opposed to just one so the slight mismatch is still visible.

The grain alignment is indicated by the black line.

This is now showing the waste and the overlapping sections fallen away.
As there is no guide drill bit fitted removal es simple by inserting a screwdriver and letting the wheel fall away.

Note there is no buildup of resin or compacted burnt sawdust on the holesaw in both external and internal surfaces. the removal as previously reported is easy it almost falls away.

A ggod tip all round.

-- Regards Robert

View pottz's profile

pottz

1987 posts in 765 days


#15 posted 10-02-2017 01:31 AM

oh rob late to the party again!but hey its better your late than not show up,because it aint a party till the aussies show up!cheers.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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