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Project by Calgirl posted 11-08-2007 09:14 PM 2122 views 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Got some Hardiboard up and it looks like a real shop now (from two sides). Plans change daily and now the electrician will be here either Sat. or Mon. The painters will be here Monday, but I have decided to paint the garage myself so that I can take my time preparing it. The previous owner had the garage built and they did not use galvanized nails…hence, I have multiple (and I do mean multiple) rusty nail heads which I will lightly sand and apply Kilz to prior to painting. I’m also going to build the pump shed. I’ve got loads of quality scrap from the shop project…..threaded rod for jigs, OSB, Hardiboard, and 2×4’s. One of todays pictures shows the unloading door frame….still no door yet. The builder (Richard) says that he needs the Hardiboard up first.
On the floor in that same shot is the attic ladder that they will put up for me…....I’m so pleased with these guys and their work. Maybe I’ll get a front door tomorrow also.

-- Forget the health food, I need all the preservatives I can get !





11 comments so far

View Myron Wooley's profile

Myron Wooley

226 posts in 2643 days


#1 posted 11-08-2007 09:22 PM

I used HardiPlank for my shop. Eats the heck out of hole saws! My painter really liked how it takes paint, and I really like how it didn’t burn two weeks ago!

Looking better every day…

-- The days are long and the years are short...

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2741 days


#2 posted 11-08-2007 10:06 PM

Isn’t it a wonderful thing when you have capable and competent laborers? It really can be a pleasant experience!

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2709 days


#3 posted 11-08-2007 10:40 PM

It sure looks good, Cal. You might as well throw in a roof between the house and shop and have a breeze way or do they call that a dog trot in crackerville?

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2128 posts in 2671 days


#4 posted 11-08-2007 11:17 PM

Moe, Larry and curly right? What a happy crue! Great photos!

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8791 posts in 2846 days


#5 posted 11-09-2007 08:14 AM

I am a huge fan of fiber cement products. As a remodeling contractor I see what holds up and what does not. I like these products and they look great. Fire, termite, and rot resistant. And Myron is right, it takes and holds paint very well and eats up hole saws.

Thanks for the update.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2744 days


#6 posted 11-09-2007 08:45 AM

and you do mean big progress – you’re gonna have your completed shop in no time!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View cajunpen's profile

cajunpen

14429 posts in 2813 days


#7 posted 11-09-2007 09:40 AM

Wow, it does look like a shop. Won’t be long now before you get some dust flying.

-- Bill - "Suit yourself and let the rest be pleased." http://www.cajunpen.com/

View Alan Robertson's profile

Alan Robertson

66 posts in 2665 days


#8 posted 11-09-2007 06:18 PM

Your shop is growing just fine. A fine example of what true mechanics ( that’s what you are when you know what you’re doing) are turned loose. A few ideas- my walls are covered with 7/16”x 8”x 16’ OSB exterior siding, edge to edge. I butted mine so that the walls would be flat for hanging patterns, tools, jigs, etc. It’s a baked on wood grained, primed finish and edges. Easy to work with and very strong. I finished mine with 2 coats white satin for brightness. Installed 8’ twin tube flourescent for lighting. If you want to save yourself a step get the Industrial F96T12/D/HO Daylight tubes. I’ll never go back to standard. Steel air lines are best for air, but expensive to buy and install (unless your a plumber with all the tools, cutting and threading). I’ve been using sched-40 pvc for 15 yrs. Inexpensive, do it yourself, easy to change or add to. I keep a short ( 10’ to 15’ ) length of hose always hooked up at my most used drops. Recommend you give your slab a lot more time to dry out before applying epoxy. Know you don’t want to hear this, maybe several mos. Lot of moisture is still trapped in the concrete. Hope you can use some of this. Al

-- MrAl

View IowaWoodcrafter's profile

IowaWoodcrafter

280 posts in 2823 days


#9 posted 11-09-2007 06:28 PM

CalGirl,

On a recent episode of FindersFixers, (on the DIY network), a couple had problems with rust. One thing that was mentioned was when rust has started it will never stop and no paint will prevent it. The fix was to remove the offending nails and use stainless or galvenized. The key is to nail them somewhere else because the rust in the wood fibers will quickly cause any new nail to begin to rust immediately.

-- Owen Johnson - aka IowaWoodcrafter

View Calgirl's profile

Calgirl

188 posts in 2642 days


#10 posted 11-09-2007 06:35 PM

Al,
Thanks for your post. I just decided about an hour ago to go with the OSB 1/2” for the ceiling and walls. I did not realize that there was a semi-smooth side so my initial objection was overcome.

Thanks for the recommendation on the tubes. I bought one industrial 4’-two tube fixture the other day. I wanted to get it up and see if I liked it before buying the rest. It was a little pricey, but I think it has a good reflector. We’ll see.

Since I’m so conflicted about the epoxy paint, I’m going to just let that dog sleep for a while. It will be harder to put it down once everything is moved in, but what the heck. I need to make sure that I use what will be best in the long run.

My cyclone collection routh is 6” S&D pipe, layed below the slab. I have placed the outlets hopefully where they will best serve the machines…....I guess we will see when the move-in date gets here. I’m struggling with the transitions….I don’t want to use stuff which will cause the suction air to be lessened. I bought some flashing that I may handmake some of the transitions and I also got one of the things that roofers use to surround pipes coming thru the roof to use as machine attachments. I can enlarge the outlet on those thingys (whatever they are) to my needs. Maybe they will work, maybe not, I’ll find that out in the next couple of weeks. I want to use 6” as much as possible, so the machines that need two dust collection points will have to be 4” and 2”, draining into the 6” pipe.

Again, thanks for the info in your post. The ‘jocks and their input has been very helpful to me.

-- Forget the health food, I need all the preservatives I can get !

View Calgirl's profile

Calgirl

188 posts in 2642 days


#11 posted 11-09-2007 09:37 PM

Iowa,
Yes, I’ve heard that also. However, were talking about 50 nails to a panel, and there are about 28 panels. So, my best bet is to sand a little of the rust off and cover it with Kilz, and then repaint the building. The
rusty nails are on the two sides and back. I guess I’ll just have to live with it. Maybe before the panels fall off someone will invent an easier fix than removing each nail.

-- Forget the health food, I need all the preservatives I can get !

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