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New take on table saw fence/outfeed/rip capacity/router, plus saw referb

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Project by Rammstein1224 posted 08-29-2017 02:55 PM 1856 views 7 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Feel free to skip over my ramblings and just look at pictures…

I started doing woodworking about 2 years ago when i finally bought a house. I found this old Delta 34-670 on Craigslist and took it home and started cutting wood. Needless to say it wasn’t long before i realized the flaws and limitations of the saws accessories. The saw itself was plenty powerful for my needs, so i decided i needed a new fence and outfeed table.

Problem was my house, while great for a starter house, the basement floor would make M.C. Escher go WTF? So whatever i built would have to be free standing or would have to have leveling feel but with where i wanted to put it some operations would require the saw to move so leveling feet wouldn’t have worked.

I figured i was going to be tearing a lot of the saw apart to replace brushes and belt i also decided to clean everything up and repaint over that puke green Delta liked to use on their old machines. I think it makes it look a little more modern.

After looking online at aftermarket fences online and then subsequently looking at said fence prices(especially that pretty incra, i decided to design one myself using 80/20 since we use it almost on a daily basis at work. I based my design loosely on the incra but i incorporated a built in infeed table. As you can see in the pictures i just used the 80/20 as a skeleton and put MDF on top of it to give it a smooth surface. The brackets i had made at work allow there to be a bit of adjustment up and down and angulary. I also had them mill a flat surface on the front rail for a stick on tape measurer but i may just get a wixey. For now though a good old tape measure works fine. If you look closely you can see the way the joints are oriented it will allow this fixture to be nearly universal so if i ever get a different saw i can pull this off and use it on it.

For the fence i used a linear bearing and a 3×3 piece of 80/20. I chose to go with a biesemeyer style of only one attach point since i didnt want to have an opening on the back side of the saw for the back rail. When its all shimmed right and tightened down theres nearly no deflection on the back end unless you push with an unreasonable amount of force. I havent had any problems feeding or with burning so i feel it works great.

As for the router mounted on the side its nothing special just a piece of 12×12x1/2 UHMW with a bosch MRF23EVS-RT bolted to the bottom but the position allows me to use the saw fence for the router as well so that is nice. The slots in the 80/20 allow me to make lots of jigs too so thats nice.

All in all im pretty happy with it. As i use it more and more i want to make a cabinet for it but the uneven floor remains a problem so time will tell. Any questions feel free to ask, if you are really interested i could probably dig up parts lists and some dwgs.

-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.





15 comments so far

View richardchaos's profile (online now)

richardchaos

555 posts in 216 days


#1 posted 08-29-2017 05:48 PM

What is the FENCE system?

-- β€œIn a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

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Rammstein1224

28 posts in 276 days


#2 posted 08-29-2017 06:06 PM

None, i designed it myself


What is the FENCE system?

- richardchaos


-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.

View JamesVavra's profile

JamesVavra

304 posts in 3153 days


#3 posted 08-29-2017 07:03 PM

That’s a great design. What was the cost on all of that 80/20?

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Rammstein1224

28 posts in 276 days


#4 posted 08-29-2017 07:14 PM

About 315 IIRC but i get a discount where i work since they are one of our suppliers.


That s a great design. What was the cost on all of that 80/20?

- JamesVavra


-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1312 posts in 657 days


#5 posted 08-30-2017 05:50 AM

Neat job on refurbishment and the 80/20 (whatever that is normally used for) Ram’24.

OK, I did a Google so I can never again say that I don’t know what it is.


..... i want to make a cabinet for it but the uneven floor remains a problem so time will tell.

- Rammstein1224


If you translate the tabletop dimensions to the base and throw in some surrounding cabinets, you may get away with the triangulation concept over your uneven floor.
Get 3 heavy duty nylon casters… suggest starting at 100-150mm (just wheel diameter)... just consider the final tabletop height unless you have platform work boots. With the bulk of the weight supported by the two front wheels, the middle back wheel (3rd) should provide sufficient maneuverability and auto levelling over an uneven floor. With a bit of luck it may provide sufficient stability, however, the proof is in the building and a big DOH! if it doesn’t work. However, once moved on the 3 wheels, some stabilisers could be incorporated in the build and activated to provide back corner support for large sheet ripping.

Luck in whatever you do.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View JamesVavra's profile

JamesVavra

304 posts in 3153 days


#6 posted 08-30-2017 11:50 AM

Any chance you want to put together an 80/20 package and ship it to Nashville? I’d want the exact same thing, but in a total exterior dimension of 72” x 42”, no need for the tape line milling, and probably need to leave the shortest rails (that attach to the table’s sides) a little long so I can cut to exact dimension.

James

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Rammstein1224

28 posts in 276 days


#7 posted 08-30-2017 01:28 PM

LittleBlackDuck- Thanks, i love 80/20. You can make nearly anything with it and its really easy to put together.

I had thought about using three wheels. The temporary base i put on it right now its kind of nice since it flexes a bit so it some what compensates for the floor. I think as i get my shop together more and more it may end up not moving as much as i think so leveling feet wont be as big a deal.

JamesVavra- i dont think so. like i said i get a discount and on top of it i get it delivered for free at my work so it would be a bit more for an average person. i can give you my parts list and you can have it quoted at your nearest dealer and maybe it wont be that bad.

-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.

View JamesVavra's profile

JamesVavra

304 posts in 3153 days


#8 posted 08-30-2017 01:31 PM

Ram – unfortunately, the images are too small to see. Can you email to JamesVavra@ gmail.com ?

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bushmaster

2506 posts in 2119 days


#9 posted 08-30-2017 01:33 PM

Very nice build.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Rammstein1224's profile

Rammstein1224

28 posts in 276 days


#10 posted 08-30-2017 01:37 PM

Yea i noticed that, trying to fix it but it just doesn’t post big enough i guess.


Ram – unfortunately, the images are too small to see. Can you email to JamesVavra@ gmail.com ?

- JamesVavra


-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

7461 posts in 2165 days


#11 posted 08-30-2017 01:41 PM

Nice set up. That should serve you well for a long time.

We’ve used those exact same 80/20 linear motion slide blocks (I can’t call them a “bearing” as there’s not rolly balls in them :^) for several custom machine projects at work. How repeatable is it working out to keep the fence perpendicular every time you set it?

Regarding “brushes”... All of the contractor type saws I’ve seen have induction motors (no brushes) with a belt driven arbor and the trunnions mounted to the underside of the table casting. The only TSs I’ve seen with universal motors (with brushes) are the direct drive, plastic framed, portable job site saws.

You might want to put a leg on each of the back corners, as you’ve got quite the lever arm set up and a large panel might tip the saw.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View Rammstein1224's profile

Rammstein1224

28 posts in 276 days


#12 posted 08-30-2017 01:57 PM

Linear bearing is what 80/20 calls them. Technically they arent traditional linear bearings that are mounted in pillow blocks but i guess they couldnt come up with a better name. As for alignment its not nearly as quick and easy as a standard fence but with as big as the table is i dont really need to take it off very much. I just use a piece of 3/4 mdf in the miter slot and reference the fence to that and tighten the bolts down.

Well its direct drive as in the blade mounts directly to the motor but on the back side of the motor theres a small Ø3” belt. But its not much for keeping the noise down as it screams like a banshee when its going.


Nice set up. That should serve you well for a long time.

We ve used those exact same 80/20 linear motion slide blocks (I can t call them a “bearing” as there s not rolly balls in them :^) for several custom machine projects at work. How repeatable is it working out to keep the fence perpendicular every time you set it?

Regarding “brushes”... All of the contractor type saws I ve seen have induction motors (no brushes) with a belt driven arbor and the trunnions mounted to the underside of the table casting. The only TSs I ve seen with universal motors (with brushes) are the direct drive, plastic framed, portable job site saws.

- Mainiac Matt


-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

29158 posts in 2703 days


#13 posted 08-30-2017 02:24 PM

That is a very nice TS and router table combination. It will be a very nice addition to your shop.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View JamesVavra's profile

JamesVavra

304 posts in 3153 days


#14 posted 08-30-2017 02:29 PM

Thanks for the parts list! Just to be clear, this is everything except for the brackets attaching the 80/20 to the table of the saw (if so, I can fabricate those)?

James

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Rammstein1224

28 posts in 276 days


#15 posted 08-30-2017 02:55 PM

Hopefully this isnt too small either. Yes that is all the 80/20 parts plus a few extra bolts and t-nuts for jigs. You may have to modify the size of the slots for the bolts that attach to your saw if they are bigger.


Thanks for the parts list! Just to be clear, this is everything except for the brackets attaching the 80/20 to the table of the saw (if so, I can fabricate those)?

James

- JamesVavra


-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.

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