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Peterbilt Sleeper and Trailer

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Project by darkmyble posted 08-28-2017 06:22 PM 1543 views 3 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This project took close to 30 hours to complete. Lots of off plan embellishments here which took the time. I’m not overly happy with the air filters. I had to use my drill press as a vertical lathe which I am just not used to at all. Not having a lathe makes these little additions rather difficult, but they look okay I guess.
All that’s left to do is apply several coats of Dutch Oil..
I enjoyed this project.. just shy of a metre long it will make any child proud to own it.. I know I am proud of it.. I hope you like it too :)

-- If at first we don't succeed, measure and measure again





18 comments so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

3531 posts in 2051 days


#1 posted 08-28-2017 06:48 PM

I do think it turned out great
You have every reason to be proud of it.

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

View darkmyble's profile

darkmyble

21 posts in 73 days


#2 posted 08-28-2017 08:24 PM



I do think it turned out great
You have every reason to be proud of it.

- ralbuck

Many thanks for your kind words.. I enjoy making these toys and kind words give me inspiration to continue

-- If at first we don't succeed, measure and measure again

View diggerdelaney's profile

diggerdelaney

431 posts in 3535 days


#3 posted 08-28-2017 10:27 PM

Great job on the build. That is one nice truck. Like you I am also enjoy making toys and models from wood

-- Derek, Kent, UK, http://s702.photobucket.com/albums/ww21/diggerdelaney/

View htl's profile

htl

2982 posts in 944 days


#4 posted 08-29-2017 12:01 AM

One heavy duty truck ready to haul anything a younghen could need.
Great job!!!

Your hooked, with 4 great toys under your belt, what next. lol

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View darkmyble's profile

darkmyble

21 posts in 73 days


#5 posted 08-29-2017 07:09 AM



Great job on the build. That is one nice truck. Like you I am also enjoy making toys and models from wood

- diggerdelaney

Many thanks.. I love working with wood.. the time just passes by, its like I’m on auto pilot. Its very therapeutic and keeps me out of trouble haha!

-- If at first we don't succeed, measure and measure again

View darkmyble's profile

darkmyble

21 posts in 73 days


#6 posted 08-29-2017 07:12 AM



One heavy duty truck ready to haul anything a younghen could need.
Great job!!!

Your hooked, with 4 great toys under your belt, what next. lol

- htl

Well I posted some images of the build on a well known social site and I have a friend in California who wants the same truck but with a lowboy trailer. It apparently looks like his old truck so it looks as if ill be making another. Other than that though I have an old style Fire Engine, Landrover, 3 versions of overcab trucks and lots more to do. I think I may be busy!

-- If at first we don't succeed, measure and measure again

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2778 posts in 497 days


#7 posted 08-29-2017 02:11 PM

WOW …...this is a beauty …I like the fact that it hooks up to trailer …... GREAT JOB :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View darkmyble's profile

darkmyble

21 posts in 73 days


#8 posted 08-29-2017 04:20 PM


WOW …...this is a beauty …I like the fact that it hooks up to trailer …... GREAT JOB :<))

- GR8HUNTER

Thanks Hunter.. I loved this project.. and after posting it on social media I now have to make another 3!!
Posted photo here is after 2 coats of Dutch oil, it just pulls the grain right out.. absolutely gorgeous, and ive only used Pine, two types of mahogany and birch. The end result is wonderful and for my novice attempts I am really proud of this.. let the building commence! haha

-- If at first we don't succeed, measure and measure again

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2778 posts in 497 days


#9 posted 08-29-2017 07:40 PM

yes the oils really make woods pop out and come to life …..looks even nicer :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View darkmyble's profile

darkmyble

21 posts in 73 days


#10 posted 08-29-2017 07:57 PM



yes the oils really make woods pop out and come to life …..looks even nicer :<))

- GR8HUNTER

I’ve tried several.. I quite like Tung oil but Dutch tends to be my favourite as it dries hard.. the more coats i apply the more sheen it produces.. although I could just put polyurethane on it.. but then that doesn’t do much for the grain. Any advice would be gratefully received and appreciated

-- If at first we don't succeed, measure and measure again

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2778 posts in 497 days


#11 posted 08-29-2017 08:24 PM

when I use Danish oil I let mine dry for several days before Appling poly :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View darkmyble's profile

darkmyble

21 posts in 73 days


#12 posted 08-29-2017 08:36 PM



when I use Danish oil I let mine dry for several days before Appling poly :<))

- GR8HUNTER

Excellent advice.. I was unsure (until now) on that very issue.. thank you. How many coats of Danish do you apply? I’m at 2 so far

-- If at first we don't succeed, measure and measure again

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2778 posts in 497 days


#13 posted 08-29-2017 08:47 PM

all depends like construction equipment I only like 1 but like other things sometimes 2 or 3 :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1227 posts in 605 days


#14 posted 08-30-2017 02:14 AM

Came in late darkmyble, but it still remains a great “little” (a short 1M) build…. The trailer certainly adds sophistication to it. And of course the before and after the oiling is a no brainer.

At the rate you’re churning you models out are you trying to give htl some competition?

One suggestion if I may… A few imbedded pickies in the project wouldn’t go astray… especially when you master a tricky manoeuver. As htl quotes “There’s a hundred ways to do anything”... add another woodworker into the foray and now there’s 101 ways… you may come up with a method that may be so simple or clever that us old codgers (and the young chippers) might never have consider. Far too often woodworkers err with the belief that while they’ve been using a method for countless years (even if they got inspired by some other unrelated build), everyone else know about it. Only recently I discovered if I turn on the power to my table saw it’s easier to push the timber through… Just kidding but you may get my drift.

Just an FYI to consider and further confuse you. Never heard of Dutch oil so here’s my take.
I always apply 1 coat of tung oil (actually “hard burnishing” oil with the main component being tung…) and like GR8 I let it dry for at least 6 days (though tung cures quicker than Danish). I used to use Danish oil, but I found that tends to add a darker hue to the model so I stick to the more neutral tung… (it also smell better).
That I follow up with at least 3 coats of 2lb cut of dewaxed shellac. De-waxed… for the same reason as rejecting Danish as the cheaper waxed darkens the timber just 1(or 2) shades. Why shellac… It dries very quickly and I can apply 3 coats in under 1 hour and I don’t need to keep my workshop airborne dust free for too long. I only apply a 4th coat (and maybe even the 3rd.) on models with not too many small parts as every coat risks breakage. Each coat I brush on very thinly an it’s virtually ready for the next coat within minutes.

However, the above is personal preference, and I was in a typing mood while the finish on my latest project was drying… I didn’t use shellac.

PS. Congrats on your success with pine. While I love the look and its sooo easy on the tools, I find it too soft and the “dent-removal” iron gets more use on my pine projects than on my pleated skirts. I have also found that it’s far too prone to tear out (even with super sharp tools)... but then again, it may be my skill deficiency.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View darkmyble's profile

darkmyble

21 posts in 73 days


#15 posted 08-30-2017 07:22 AM


Came in late darkmyble, but it still remains a great “little” (a short 1M) build…. The trailer certainly adds sophistication to it. And of course the before and after the oiling is a no brainer.

At the rate you re churning you models out are you trying to give htl some competition?

One suggestion if I may… A few imbedded pickies in the project wouldn t go astray… especially when you master a tricky manoeuver. As htl quotes “There s a hundred ways to do anything”... add another woodworker into the foray and now there s 101 ways… you may come up with a method that may be so simple or clever that us old codgers (and the young chippers) might never have consider. Far too often woodworkers err with the belief that while they ve been using a method for countless years (even if they got inspired by some other unrelated build), everyone else know about it. Only recently I discovered if I turn on the power to my table saw it s easier to push the timber through… Just kidding but you may get my drift.

Just an FYI to consider and further confuse you. Never heard of Dutch oil so here s my take.
I always apply 1 coat of tung oil (actually “hard burnishing” oil with the main component being tung…) and like GR8 I let it dry for at least 6 days (though tung cures quicker than Danish). I used to use Danish oil, but I found that tends to add a darker hue to the model so I stick to the more neutral tung… (it also smell better).
That I follow up with at least 3 coats of 2lb cut of dewaxed shellac. De-waxed… for the same reason as rejecting Danish as the cheaper waxed darkens the timber just 1(or 2) shades. Why shellac… It dries very quickly and I can apply 3 coats in under 1 hour and I don t need to keep my workshop airborne dust free for too long. I only apply a 4th coat (and maybe even the 3rd.) on models with not too many small parts as every coat risks breakage. Each coat I brush on very thinly an it s virtually ready for the next coat within minutes.

However, the above is personal preference, and I was in a typing mood while the finish on my latest project was drying… I didn t use shellac.

PS. Congrats on your success with pine. While I love the look and its sooo easy on the tools, I find it too soft and the “dent-removal” iron gets more use on my pine projects than on my pleated skirts. I have also found that it s far too prone to tear out (even with super sharp tools)... but then again, it may be my skill deficiency.

- LittleBlackDuck

This is why I joined Lumberjocks.. this is invaluable information to me.
I have Tung Oil.. but I know nothing about Shellac… absolutely zero. I definitely need help concerning this.

I have 3 more of the same Truck to make now.. its proving rather popular.

One thing I’ve found.. there’s a fine line between hobby and making money. I started making toys because I’m disabled and don’t want to sit on my ass all day.. now my work is proving popular and this truck and trailer is flying selling at $200 a pop.. some say I’m under selling my self.. but I have to remember this is a hobby.. not a money making venture.

But anyway thank you for your kind words and the information.. if you could help me learn more about Shellac I would be very grateful.

Thanks again

EDIT

I use pine because at the start of this venture it was free.. as is my hardwood which I get free from a window manufacturer. So I have pine, oak, and various types of mahogany available to me. I recently purchased a shed load of pine for £35 ($41)
I can work it with minimal effort its not too hard on my table saw blade or my band saw and whilst I get some tear out I tend to use several pieces of wood to minimise it.
I don’t have a workshop or a semi-pro set up.. but I do what I can with what I have. Eventually I hope to have a 14’x10’ shed in which I can work, but this will be a while away yet.
I will definitely post more images as my work progresses. To be honest I only found out I could do this yesterday haha..

My go to brand for stains and oils is Liberon.. they do a White Shellac / French Polish apparently used for light coloured wood with no need for additional colour. Its a reasonable £24 for 1 litre ($30) would this be something I could use? I have to keep costings to a minimal.. but if a Tung oil and then shellac gives me a better finish I don’t mind investing.

Thanks again for all your help..

-- If at first we don't succeed, measure and measure again

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