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Another End grain cutting Board (My First)

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Project by Slider20 posted 08-07-2017 09:28 PM 1865 views 4 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

First try at an end grain cutting board. Sanding was a bear, I see why people who do this allot get drum sanders.

Used Wlanut, Cherry and Ash. Finished with Mineral Oil.





13 comments so far

View sras's profile

sras

4597 posts in 2914 days


#1 posted 08-08-2017 12:04 AM

Very nice – especially for a first board!!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

117 posts in 306 days


#2 posted 08-08-2017 03:32 AM



Very nice – especially for a first board!!

- sras

Thanks. I enjoyed making it, I think I’d try another finish next time, maybe the Salad Bowl finish from General Finishes.

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

6629 posts in 1828 days


#3 posted 08-08-2017 03:40 AM

Great job, first or not. Cool pattern. Even with a drum sander it’s a slow go.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View TexasToddT's profile

TexasToddT

46 posts in 706 days


#4 posted 08-08-2017 06:24 AM

Great pattern! The cherry is simply gorgeous! Good job on your first board. Making end grain boards seems to teach the same lessons to folks who undertake their making.

Because making a single board involves many processes, I like to buy a bunch of wood and make mine in batches. That way I can: (1) plane all my boards to the same thickness at once, (2) make all my long cuts at once for width, (3) plane the glued-up boards to smooth the top/bottom, (4) sand them at once using increasingly finer sandpaper, and (5) apply my heated up mineral oil and beeswax mixture all at the same time.

I give them away as gifts and no one has complained that I use the same pattern (the pattern was in Wood Magazine a couple years ago) over and over. Unfortunately, most people say they don’t want to use them since they are so nice, but that in itself is a compliment.

Honestly, if you gave me the board you made, I might not use it either. It is a piece of art.

-- TT

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

117 posts in 306 days


#5 posted 08-08-2017 10:56 AM



Great pattern! The cherry is simply gorgeous! Good job on your first board. Making end grain boards seems to teach the same lessons to folks who undertake their making.

Because making a single board involves many processes, I like to buy a bunch of wood and make mine in batches. That way I can: (1) plane all my boards to the same thickness at once, (2) make all my long cuts at once for width, (3) plane the glued-up boards to smooth the top/bottom, (4) sand them at once using increasingly finer sandpaper, and (5) apply my heated up mineral oil and beeswax mixture all at the same time.

I give them away as gifts and no one has complained that I use the same pattern (the pattern was in Wood Magazine a couple years ago) over and over. Unfortunately, most people say they don t want to use them since they are so nice, but that in itself is a compliment.

Honestly, if you gave me the board you made, I might not use it either. It is a piece of art.

- TexasToddT

Thanks, I really like the cherry, the walnut has a nice contrast color, and the Ash as well, but for the next one I’d still use cherry, but maybe experiment with other woods, if I want to use this same pattern. Maybe butternut instead of Ash, and sapelle instead of Walnut.

You are right, for such a small project it required allot of time, certainly see the value in batching them out.

It’s a very nice gift idea, and I do relate to not using it, my wife said that for regular cooking it’s not something she would like to use (as it’s not dishwasher safe). So it relegated to dinner parties and brunches as a bread board.

I’ll have to check out that pattern you referenced. I made this pattern up, but I imagine that others have designed near identical ones. I like how the straight lines take up most of the space and it not overly busy in its appearance

View handmadewithashley's profile

handmadewithashley

21 posts in 82 days


#6 posted 08-08-2017 12:45 PM

This came out really nice! I’m new to making end grain cutting boards too. They’re really fun. I can’t wait to make more :)

-- Ashley, Alabama, Instagram - @handmadewithashley, http://www.ashleygrenon.com

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

28263 posts in 2651 days


#7 posted 08-08-2017 02:11 PM

This is a beautiful cutting board and I like the pattern.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2778 posts in 497 days


#8 posted 08-08-2017 02:51 PM

beautiful board …GREAT JOB :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

117 posts in 306 days


#9 posted 08-08-2017 08:50 PM



This came out really nice! I m new to making end grain cutting boards too. They re really fun. I can t wait to make more :)

- handmadewithashley


This is a beautiful cutting board and I like the pattern.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

- helluvawreck


beautiful board …GREAT JOB :<))

- GR8HUNTER

Thanks so much

View John's profile

John

907 posts in 1055 days


#10 posted 08-09-2017 01:59 AM

Awesome job on your board!

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

117 posts in 306 days


#11 posted 08-09-2017 02:45 AM



Awesome job on your board!

- John

Thanks so much

View dalepage's profile

dalepage

289 posts in 625 days


#12 posted 08-09-2017 10:40 AM

Nicely done. Your color choices are excellent.

Yes, I use a drum sander, but before that, I use a planer. There will be many who say you can’t plane end grain, but it’s just not so. On each end, I put sacrificial strips of whatever scrap wood I have. Then I take off only about a quarter turn on my wheel when I lower the table. It might help to run the end grain board through at a slight angle. Be patient and don’t try to take off too much. If your board is not flat after the glue-up, glue on a shim so that you can level one side. The shim will be planed off when you do the other side.

All the tendency to tear-out is prevented by the sacrificial scraps. When you’ve got the board flattened, you saw off the sacrificial ends. I use a crosscut sled and trim all four edges in order to get them perfect.

Then I put it through my drum sander to get off any planing marks. End grain really shows the scratches, so you might end up with some after the drum sander passes. I use my 6” Festool Rotex sander to take off the scratches from the drum sander. That 6-inch will take about 1/3 the time of a 5 inch sander.

Even though it might seem contradictory, the end grain will get a smooth surface with only 120 grit. Once the scratches are gone, and you ease the edges, you’re ready for the oil.

Now that the technique is down, I’m able to make endless designs by the way I roll and flip the “bars” end for end after my first cut and before the second gluing. This is where you can use end grain patterns for a second design feature after the color of the wood.

-- Dale

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

117 posts in 306 days


#13 posted 08-09-2017 12:17 PM


Nicely done. Your color choices are excellent.

Yes, I use a drum sander, but before that, I use a planer. There will be many who say you can t plane end grain, but it s just not so. On each end, I put sacrificial strips of whatever scrap wood I have. Then I take off only about a quarter turn on my wheel when I lower the table. It might help to run the end grain board through at a slight angle. Be patient and don t try to take off too much. If your board is not flat after the glue-up, glue on a shim so that you can level one side. The shim will be planed off when you do the other side.

All the tendency to tear-out is prevented by the sacrificial scraps. When you ve got the board flattened, you saw off the sacrificial ends. I use a crosscut sled and trim all four edges in order to get them perfect.

Then I put it through my drum sander to get off any planing marks. End grain really shows the scratches, so you might end up with some after the drum sander passes. I use my 6” Festool Rotex sander to take off the scratches from the drum sander. That 6-inch will take about 1/3 the time of a 5 inch sander.

Even though it might seem contradictory, the end grain will get a smooth surface with only 120 grit. Once the scratches are gone, and you ease the edges, you re ready for the oil.

Now that the technique is down, I m able to make endless designs by the way I roll and flip the “bars” end for end after my first cut and before the second gluing. This is where you can use end grain patterns for a second design feature after the color of the wood.

- dalepage

Seems much easier, I think I’ll try that next time with the planer, although my planer only has 13” capacity, so probably can’t put it in on an angle.

I used a hand held 4×24 belt sander for flattening, and I went too far on one side and sanded in a nice divot (now that the bottom).

I didn’t really like the belt sander for this, I went from the belt to a 6” random orbit sander, I actually own a 5” Rotex and I just don’t know why it didn’t occur to me to use it on this cutting board.

Thanks so much.

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