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Future bowl bonanza

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Project by jtriggs posted 07-05-2017 07:20 PM 669 views 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Happy Fourth of July to me! My brother’s farm experienced a high wind about 3 weeks ago. One of the trees that toppled was a walnut. He brought me 7 chunks of the trunk yesterday. I got 5 of them treated with Anchor Seal and the others are going to get a painting as soon as I can get to it. These should make some interesting bowls. These are bigger than most I’ve turned but I’m looking forward to it.

The heart wood averages 16” in dia. and the height is 18” on all of them.

He threw in a crotchy piece of ash as well. Wahoo!!!

Thanks, Jim.

-- Jon --Always remember, never live your life by a motto.





7 comments so far

View papadan's profile

papadan

3574 posts in 3124 days


#1 posted 07-05-2017 07:23 PM

Jon, you’re a lucky guy, enjoy that wood.

-- Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity!

View John's profile

John

872 posts in 1026 days


#2 posted 07-05-2017 08:14 PM

Awesome!

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View oltexasboy1's profile

oltexasboy1

249 posts in 1460 days


#3 posted 07-05-2017 10:10 PM

Since you obviously do this a lot I have a question. My grand daughter wants slabbed off pieces about 2” thick for table decorations at her reception. Some one brought me a about 2 dozen rounds that were cut about 2” thick a few days ago. They have already checked so badly that some are useless. I think it is because they are Live Oak(1st). Also they should have been left uncut for a while before they were slabbed into 2” chunks(2nd). I have absolutely no experience with this so I need to know what in your opinion would be a good wood for this ? Second question is about how long should I wait before they are recut to the 2” thickness. I have access to pine or sweet gum maybe some black jack oak on my place in the country, but no real good wood. I look forward to your input.

-- "The pursuit of perfection often yields excellence"

View Hazem's profile

Hazem

72 posts in 1004 days


#4 posted 07-05-2017 11:10 PM

I got something similar a week ago. I am new to turning. How should I carve it up?

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

27800 posts in 2622 days


#5 posted 07-06-2017 02:02 PM

That’s a nice stock for projects.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View jtriggs's profile

jtriggs

164 posts in 3573 days


#6 posted 07-06-2017 06:44 PM

Hazem, to answer your question, I will chainsaw down the length of a section to the left and right of the center pith. I will also cut the outer inch or three off, parallel to the first cut so I end up with a bowl blank out of each half of the log section. See the illustration below.

-- Jon --Always remember, never live your life by a motto.

View rodneywt1180b's profile

rodneywt1180b

141 posts in 142 days


#7 posted 07-07-2017 12:25 AM



Since you obviously do this a lot I have a question. My grand daughter wants slabbed off pieces about 2” thick for table decorations at her reception. Some one brought me a about 2 dozen rounds that were cut about 2” thick a few days ago. They have already checked so badly that some are useless. I think it is because they are Live Oak(1st). Also they should have been left uncut for a while before they were slabbed into 2” chunks(2nd). I have absolutely no experience with this so I need to know what in your opinion would be a good wood for this ? Second question is about how long should I wait before they are recut to the 2” thickness. I have access to pine or sweet gum maybe some black jack oak on my place in the country, but no real good wood. I look forward to your input.

- oltexasboy1

Rounds will almost always split like yours did. It has to do with the way wood dries. Wood shrinks the most across the grain and very little if any along it’s length. Imagine peeling the rings off the tree like an onion. The outer rings are longer than the inner ones. They shrink at the same percentage but the bigger rings shrink more. once the strength of the wood is exceeded by the forces created by that shrinkage the wood splits to relieve the stress.
As far as the practical question goes. I don’t know what wood would be less likely to split.
Rodney

-- Rodney, Centralia, WA, USA www.etsy.com/shop/ASturdyStick

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