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MY PLANES - My babies

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Project by BertFlores58 posted 05-28-2010 06:10 AM 2879 views 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These are my babies. As they need following ABC’s:
A—‘ALAGA’- ATTENTION – Normal for a baby that it needs attention and care and so the planes.
B—‘BATO’ – BLADE – Sharpenning, honing, tampering and many others … a baby needs to be sharp
C—‘KONDISYON’ – CONDITION – Conditioning of the body is a must to all planes. Wear and tear including the straightnes of the moving places.
On Fig plane 1—
from left—
jack plane. Blade is 25 deg inclined using stanley. Molave wood both at sole and side, Mango rear handle, I recyled stanley knob. Most used on planing softwood that normally tears away. Expert in cutting off the burrs from flat boards. The sole of Molave is very hard and slippery as it has oil in it.

jackplane Japanese style – one piece body and no gluing of side. The old hacksaw blade was used on this plane which is really sharp. Basically I use this for rough planing on recycled wood. The wood is a jackfruit timber. I seldom use this because the blade is so tough that is also very hard to sharpen. The stone is consumed before the blade reaches the sharpest state. Not good if there are nails as blade breaks in big portions.

SMOOTH PLANE – A low angle plane that has recess on the other side. Expert baby for cutting corners of dados and shoulders. Quite heavy because of the wood: Yakal for the sole, sides are unidentified from malaysian wood, Mango blade holder, Molave on the sliding chamfering face. Quite big blade width – 2”

SMOOTH PLANE – My favorite babe – inspired by Philly plane. 50 deg angle blade. The body is a modified Krenov style made from MOLAVE that is so hard and very slippery. The blade is locked by a NARRA spike. It fits into my grip. In this, I learned to hardened, temper and sharpened an O1 steel given to me by Philly Edwards in 2008. Used only coconut shell for the right hardenning temperature and mineral oil for cooling then immediately immerse it in chilly ice. Tempering is done by putting it in a hotplate for 30 minutes. Sharpenning is very easy using water based abrassive even with sandpaper. For honing, I normally use the stone from Albay used by barbers and tailors in sharpening their razors and scissors respectively. I have used this for my cutting sledge, mitering, cross grain planing. After several use, the sole has deteriorated very less. Thanks Phil for the O1 steel.

DADO PLANE—Philly ispired construction. The body is made of 3 pcs. of Molave to create 3/4 thick. The blade came from a 3/4 chisell. I have to use cutting grinder to create the upper part of the blade. The most difficult part was to clean and glue these MOLAVE. The oil in the Molave reacts on the glue and it becomes yellowish however it dried up. This is a good plane specially if I have a mistake when routing dados in plywood. The angle of blade is just right that it even cut cross grain in a smooth action.

SMOOTH PLANE – This is quite small—only 4 inches length. Blade is same O1 steel. Very sharp and precise. This is very good in planing very hard wood in any direction. This had helped me a lot in my jewelry box making. It is exact to my grip. Rounding off edges is his special quality. The body is made from Yakal – really hard and heavy. The side wood is GUAVA and the blade locking spike is made from NARRA.

THE YOUNGEST BABE PLANE—I extended the handle for precise grip. This is very good for cleaning bamboo strips and making round rods like dowels. Not often used but when you need it, it will always do the job for those big brothers above.

-- Bert





12 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112882 posts in 2324 days


#1 posted 05-28-2010 06:13 AM

Very nice collection

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View thatwoodworkingguy's profile

thatwoodworkingguy

375 posts in 1677 days


#2 posted 05-28-2010 08:38 AM

Nice planes

-- thatwoodworkingguy.com ~Eagle America~ ~Woodcraft~

View Philip Edwards's profile

Philip Edwards

244 posts in 3187 days


#3 posted 05-28-2010 09:49 AM

Lovely planes, Bert. Great to see such personalised tools, too. You must be very pleased with them!
Keep up the good work,
Phil

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1669 days


#4 posted 05-28-2010 10:02 AM

Thanks,
Above all, all of you in LJ had inspired me. You havent noticed that—because I am only viewing and reading LJ almost daily. Only today that I exposed myself to you.
I am also thanking you all for this website.
Cheers and More power

-- Bert

View velo_tom's profile

velo_tom

118 posts in 1763 days


#5 posted 05-28-2010 11:14 AM

Great job with the planes, very inovative. I read your profile. Sounds like you’ve also lead a quite interesting life including your present job.

-- There's no such thing as mistakes, just design changes.

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2364 posts in 1708 days


#6 posted 05-28-2010 02:28 PM

Bamboo strips? Do you build bamboo fishing rods?

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1688 days


#7 posted 05-28-2010 09:14 PM

I’ll be a mama to these babies anyday!

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2698 posts in 2034 days


#8 posted 05-28-2010 11:39 PM

Wonderful set of planes

Thanks for sharing

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1669 days


#9 posted 05-30-2010 05:32 PM

Thanks, Velo, To add some info… Im still a woodworker who happened to be a sailor in the past, and a teacher at present. Before and after means a lot… I was a chief engineer of commercial ships who has a lot of donnage…timber and strong wood… but now, I am trying to look for those for my woodwork..

Knotheard62, Last time when I was in sixth grader making a lantern. Just a tip, bamboo comes from different species, you have to be good in choosing the right stuff for the right purpose. At any rate, the bamboo is always thin on the end and thick on the bottom..

Nototoman, My babies never dull, and they always cry when they do not eat the wood. That is why the blade opening is called the mouth.. Yes they are part of the history. When you see my projects, My babies are there always. I do not use much machines planers.

-- Bert

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1669 days


#10 posted 05-30-2010 05:36 PM

Knothead, What I mean, I have only made a lantern out of bamboo during my sixth grade. I dont use bamboos. Just wait, maybe I will use on my project.

-- Bert

View Armand's profile

Armand

223 posts in 1658 days


#11 posted 06-07-2010 09:40 AM

Hey Bert, san ka bumibili ng mga handplanes mo, wala pa ako maski isa? Cute ng mga babies mo.

-- My Master is Mankind's Greatest Carpenter.

View bigike's profile

bigike

4035 posts in 2036 days


#12 posted 01-15-2011 07:24 PM

very nice collection, where do you get the wood for them? The molave,yakal,guava these sound very interesting to use.

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

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