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Beer Storage and Brewing Table

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Project by velo_tom posted 05-25-2010 02:03 PM 3141 views 2 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was a quick utility project made with plywood and biscuit joints. Pocket screws were also used to increase strength because of the weight that the cabinet will have to hold. Also because of the weight we used edge strips to support and stiffen the middle shelf and top instead of veneer to just cover the plywood edge. The bottom is strengthened by the kick.

The edge strips were the only hand work of the project. I squared a left over board from previous work then cut the rabbets down both sides of the board. Cuts were started with a wooden moving fillister plane then finished with a wooden rabbet plane. I ripped the board in half on a table saw to form the two strips.

Rounds were cut on the two strips with an 1/8” radius wooden round profile plane. Fillisters and final length of the strips were cut to size with a Japanese dovetail saw. The fillisters were then cut to a rough depth with paring chisels and finish depth with a shoulder plane. The strips fit tightly between the sides and center stiffening the carcass sides and center board as well as the shelf and top. Once in place the ends were rounded over with a paring chisel then sanded smooth.

The cabinet/table will hold four full batches of home made beer. Each batch is 5 gal. and makes roughly 54 bottles of beer or a little more than two standard cases. The wooden cases inside the cabinet we made from 1/2” plywood and each will hold 27 bottles, half a batch of beer. The finish photo shows a primary fermentor in plastic and a glass secondary fermentor. The folding table next to the cabinet will not be used in this application anymore. Wine will also be fermented on the table top so there are times it will have to support several hundred pounds of wine and beer. It took roughly a week working four to five hours a day to complete.

-- There's no such thing as mistakes, just design changes.





15 comments so far

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2953 posts in 1829 days


#1 posted 05-25-2010 03:32 PM

Looking over your previous projects and this one, you are truely a craftsman. Good quality work that definitely
serves its purpose. I know what you mean about the cost of good wine, I may have to get the wife to start
making her own. The beer is also a wonderful idea, we have three good microbreweries here in Missoula, but
my taste is just a little different from theirs. You also get to share all this with a wife who shares your interests.
May you both have long and satisfying lives.

-- As ever, Gus-the 76 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2364 posts in 1705 days


#2 posted 05-25-2010 04:32 PM

Thash really great! (hic!) Good quality work and a nice workable cabinet. Thanks for the detail photos. Is there a reason for two slots in the drawers? Vertical and horizontal position for the bottles?

View Bunarooba's profile

Bunarooba

28 posts in 1702 days


#3 posted 05-25-2010 04:32 PM

I like that idea. I have 2 brews that are just finishing there 2 stage. that are currently lines up in the corner of the kitchen. They are bottled in 2L “pop” bottles that hold the pressure well.

I like the idea of the buckets on top. I think that would work well for me if I needed to use a heating mat as it can get cold over here in the UK. I very much like the idea of the cases to hold each batch a very neat and good looking solution to storage problem

View Monty Queen's profile

Monty Queen

1585 posts in 1995 days


#4 posted 05-25-2010 04:43 PM

Awesome job.

-- Monty Q, Columbia, South Carolina.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112805 posts in 2321 days


#5 posted 05-25-2010 04:47 PM

Cheers well done

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View velo_tom's profile

velo_tom

118 posts in 1760 days


#6 posted 05-25-2010 07:24 PM

Thanks for the craftsmanship comment Bluepine38, but really I’m just a beginner and don’t know if I’ll ever get good enough to consider myself much more than that. I just really enjoy working with hand tools a lot so try to use them as much as I can. The rest is mainly trying to cover up whatever blunders occur along the way.

Speaking of blunders, the slots. Knothead62, the answer to your question. I was cutting the second endboard’s slot when my wife said, “hey, your cutting them along the wrong edge.” We looked over the blunder thinking about what to do when she said,”why not cut them that way and on the correct edge too. Then when a case is empty turn it on its side and it will still be able to pull out easily plus we know how many are empty and when to brew more beer (which we are actually going to do this afternoon). So they all got built with two sets of slots.

Bunarooba, English style brews are my favorite. Most of the kits we use to make our beer use Muntons malt extract. We often make Porters, Stouts, Pale Ales, and Brown Ales. My wife and I use to live next door in France back a few years ago. Use to love sampling the English beer when passing through England. As far as English weather goes, I remember the French joking that an Englishman would burn if exposed to strong moon light. Where we live in the states doesn’t have the mild weather that spoiled us in France though, it can get god-awful hot in the summer and extremely cold in the winter.

Thanks to all for your comments. Tom & Susan

-- There's no such thing as mistakes, just design changes.

View TroutGuy's profile

TroutGuy

223 posts in 2455 days


#7 posted 05-25-2010 09:12 PM

Very nice setup for your brewing. I was a homebrewer myself, for a while. Unfortunately I had to give it up a few years ago.

It looks like you could turn this into a three-tier setup without too much trouble. That’s the only way to fly, IMHO.

Relax! Don’t worry! Have a homebrew! :)

-- There is nothing in the world more dangerous, than a woodworker who knows how to read a micrometer...

View ElmoSr's profile

ElmoSr

240 posts in 1770 days


#8 posted 05-27-2010 02:31 PM

very nice just tell me how to make beer,,,really neat job

-- ElmoSr,Ga. Life is Hard by the Yard,,,But a Cinch by the Inch

View velo_tom's profile

velo_tom

118 posts in 1760 days


#9 posted 05-27-2010 03:58 PM

ElmoSr, Making the beer is kind of like baking a cake out of the box. Buy the box with all the ingredients. Cook the ingredients on the stove. Throw it in a fermentor and add yeast. Yeah, it’s a little more involved than that but not difficult at all. Books are available, even a free DVD from Midwest Brewers. A little searching online will bring a ton of information.

-- There's no such thing as mistakes, just design changes.

View ElmoSr's profile

ElmoSr

240 posts in 1770 days


#10 posted 05-28-2010 12:05 AM

velo_tom,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,thanks i will check it out and send you a sample of the 4th batch—-reckon it will take a few to get it close to tasting right

-- ElmoSr,Ga. Life is Hard by the Yard,,,But a Cinch by the Inch

View velo_tom's profile

velo_tom

118 posts in 1760 days


#11 posted 05-28-2010 01:06 AM

ElmoSr, You might have good results quicker than you think. We’ve been getting good results from the very first batch. Midwest Supplies had a free video we got when we ordered some equipment. Perhaps it can be watched on line without ordering anything. They have there own brew kits too.

We’ve had best results using Brewers Best Kits. They are from a big enough company that I believe they are available throughout the US and Canada. We have a Friar Tuck liquor store in town that carries Brewers Best kits plus they have the best prices I’ve found anywhere. They also carry brewing equipment. I know Friar Tuck is a chain store but I’m not sure how wide spread throughout the US, perhaps you have a local one. I couple links for info are:
http://www.brewersbestkits.com/
http://www.midwestsupplies.com/

-- There's no such thing as mistakes, just design changes.

View ElmoSr's profile

ElmoSr

240 posts in 1770 days


#12 posted 05-28-2010 12:56 PM

Hi, thanks for this information,,,will check it out,,,hope it is as good as budweiser…HA HA

-- ElmoSr,Ga. Life is Hard by the Yard,,,But a Cinch by the Inch

View Bunarooba's profile

Bunarooba

28 posts in 1702 days


#13 posted 06-18-2010 01:02 PM

velo-tom you are right it is like a box cake, but the rewards are so much more!
I have eagerly been watching the elder tree in the garden waiting for it to flower. now I will be making elderflower champagne (or fizzy wine) which last year was very tasty.
I think I will make a couple of storage cases for them. Then build up the storage set up over time.

Haha like the moon burn joke and I think it’s right. we get an hour of sun at the weekend and everyone turns red.

View velo_tom's profile

velo_tom

118 posts in 1760 days


#14 posted 06-20-2010 03:08 PM

Bunarooba. It sounds good, I’ve never had elderflower wine or champagne. Does it have a pretty unique flavor or is it similar to another sparkling wine? Do you make it like wine but not beat the CO2 out of it? I did that with one of my wine kits once and it was pretty good. I was afraid it would blow the corks out since I only put it in wine bottles with normal wine corks but no problems.

Brewing and wine making are similar to woodworking in that it follows centuries of tradition and gives a feel and appreciation for all the ancestors have learned and passed on to us. Soon as I get home from work I believe I will drink a toast to them all. I’ll drink a toast to you also in high hopes your elderflower wine turns out as tasty as before. Just wish I didn’t live an ocean away, if you lived next door perhaps you’d share a taste.

-- There's no such thing as mistakes, just design changes.

View triviasteve's profile

triviasteve

112 posts in 444 days


#15 posted 10-06-2013 02:24 PM

Very nice job! I, too, am a home brewer and am looking for projects to incorporate the two hobbies. This is a great idea!

-- You know I'm on the level 'cause my bubble's in the middle.

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