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File handles

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Project by Dave Polaschek posted 06-19-2017 01:05 AM 624 views 1 time favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
File handles
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I needed handles for a couple of my files I’m using on another project. Whipped up two from scraps around the shop. The smaller is red oak with a ¾” ID piece of aluminum tubing as a ferrule, and the larger is a bit of broom-handle, also with an aluminum ferrule. Both are shorter than normal (because my scraps were small), but still function. Not bad for an hour’s work. All hand tools except for the wire wheel on the bench grinder that I used to polish up the aluminum after bashing it into place.

-- Dave - Minneapolis





10 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

18485 posts in 2768 days


#1 posted 06-19-2017 11:09 AM

That great to make handles for the files so you don’t get stabbed with the tang. On the bottom one you might want to round off the corners more to make it friendly on your grip!
I like to round off the corners on any piece of wood I use for a pusher or a handle so it does not poke me or slip a sliver into my hand!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1334 posts in 310 days


#2 posted 06-19-2017 11:13 AM

Dave … good for you. Like a lot of my tools, these are not candidates for the next cover of Fine Woodworking, but if they keep the tang from going through your palm … you’ve done good!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

217 posts in 245 days


#3 posted 06-19-2017 11:26 AM

Thanks, Jim. I have handles for most of my files, but they’re stored safely away in some location I can’t remember (aka lost). I’ll round the corners over time. That’s a good activity to do while I’m waiting for finish to dry on something else.

Ron, that was one purpose, but the other was to have a small, quick project I could finish since I’ve been working on a project for the tool swap for over a month and was getting a little discouraged because I’m not done yet. When I start feeling that way, I make something quick & dirty that I can get done, and then my attitude in the shop is improved for long enough to get other projects wrapped up.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

26341 posts in 2529 days


#4 posted 06-19-2017 01:48 PM

When a file has a handle on it you end up taking better care of it. It’s also easier to do better work with it and it’s safer to use.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1334 posts in 310 days


#5 posted 06-19-2017 01:58 PM


Ron, that was one purpose, but the other was to have a small, quick project I could finish since I ve been working on a project for the tool swap for over a month and was getting a little discouraged because I m not done yet. When I start feeling that way, I make something quick & dirty that I can get done, and then my attitude in the shop is improved for long enough to get other projects wrapped up.

- Dave Polaschek

Right there with you, Dave. I was recently having trouble maintaining even pressure across a file while shaping a curved edge … ended up stopping and making this little contraption out of scraps …

... just insert the business end of the file, crank down the screw and go to town!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

217 posts in 245 days


#6 posted 06-19-2017 02:44 PM

Agreed Charles. That’s why I tend to have more handles than files. It’s just that some of them have fallen behind the bench or been stashed somewhere safe, and i figured it was quicker to make new ones than look for the old ones.

Nice tool, Ron. I just got a tap and die for 1”x8 threads. Next tool I’ll make will probably be a cutter to make 1” diameter dowels, and then I’ll be in the wooden nut and bolt business. :)

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1334 posts in 310 days


#7 posted 06-19-2017 03:33 PM

That’s great, Dave. Once you get started the sky’s the limit as to tool and vise applications one can come up with. Good luck!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View NotaJock's profile

NotaJock

62 posts in 762 days


#8 posted 06-19-2017 03:58 PM

Read a good book a while back that suggested heating the tang of your file, dull red is plenty hot, before driving it into a slightly under sized hole. The tang burns it’s way in that last little bit, the heat hardens the wood and you get a really tight fit.

-- Mike in SoCal

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

217 posts in 245 days


#9 posted 06-19-2017 04:15 PM

Yeah, Ron. There are too many projects on that list at the moment. I’m in the middle of building a new low workbench, and am still muddling about with workholding ideas, plus then my current workbench can get modified. It needs a new face vise that won’t rack, and a slew of other things I’ll use wooden screws for.

Mike, I’ve heard that, and I’ve heard opinions that you’re better just fitting them tightly cold. I’ll probably do some of each and decide what I like best. But first I’m going to go get some brass tubing so I can make prettier ferrules.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View ohwoodeye's profile

ohwoodeye

1834 posts in 2816 days


#10 posted 06-19-2017 05:43 PM

I don’t know for sure but I would think the opposite for fitting the handles.
Chill/freeze the metal file so it condenses. Fit it into a very tight hole and then when it warms up to room temperature it will expand back to normal size and really fit the hole tightly.

-- Directions are just the Manufacturer's opinion on how something should be assembled. ----Mike, Waukesha, WI

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