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Calvin and Hobbes Wenge Framed Print

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Project by cjones posted 1518 days ago 2805 views 5 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here is a present I just finished and gave to my step-dad. We’re both big fans of Calvin and Hobbes, and this seemed the perfect father-son type gift.

The frame is from one board of wenge that I bought off a guy for a great price in Boulder who was clearing out his shop before moving. I wanted a handsome wood, and I think the dark tones in the wood go well with the black lines of the comic strip. Overall dimensions are 27 7/8” x 20 1/4”. It turned out a lot heavier than I thought it would—I had to beef up the hanging mechanism. I spent a lot of time on Sketchup finagling the dimensions, only to have the comic print bigger than expected. I still think it works, though, for sure.

For a finish, I cleared the oils with acetone and applied a clear wax.

A note about the glass: So Micheal’s wanted me to pay $36 for a piece of ~12” x 16” glass. Instead, I went to the local flea market and bought the cheapest framed print with glass that was bigger than 12×16 and cut it down. The print (which was awfully ugly and trashed along with it’s cheap frame) cost me $2.00. Even if you include the ~$16 glass cutter from Hobby Lobby that I bought years ago and have used on many projects, I still came out way ahead.

-- Living well is the best revenge.





10 comments so far

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1307 posts in 1571 days


#1 posted 1518 days ago

beautiful! I love the design of the frame – it showcases the wood without being too direct about it.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1635 days


#2 posted 1518 days ago

I think it turned out well and the size of the frame is suited to the comic strip. I hope you used the hammer in the picture to put the frame together!

The only thing I’m curious about is why you made the vertical pieces of the frame narrower than the horizontal pieces of the frame?

I like the stark simplicistic lines of the frame, and hope you did actually have to use the hammer to get the joints tight as it would be an appropriate method of construction in this case.

I don’t suppose the “guy in Boulder” is still around and has any other wood he’d like to unload at a good price? ;)

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View cjones's profile

cjones

13 posts in 1650 days


#3 posted 1518 days ago

Glad you guys like it.

Jonathan—I designed it several months before building it, but I think I took a cue from the relative dimensions of classic raised panel doors. Often, the rails will be a slightly wider dimension than the stiles—it seems to add a little bit of pleasant complexity/dimension. Or maybe something about the shorter board being beefier brings more balance than both lengths of boards being the same width. I remember spending a lot of time on Sketchup and a lot of time researching dimensions before I came up with the final design. The one thing I specifically remember was reading about placing the image slightly above center to achieve a “visually centered” appearance. It went against my OCD tendencies, but it’s true. Something about the way people are wired to view other people makes that happen. Anyway, I’m really happy with the proportions.

Yes, I did need the hammer to put the lap joints together. :)

And no, I pretty much cleaned out the guy in Boulder.

-- Living well is the best revenge.

View cjones's profile

cjones

13 posts in 1650 days


#4 posted 1518 days ago

But I look at it again and that dimension logic doesn’t hold any water since the rails are longer here. Since the stiles are raised ~1/8” above the rails, maybe I was thinking they are like the wooden “straps” on, say, a cedar chest. Now you’ve got me all pondering the aesthetics of dimensions again.

-- Living well is the best revenge.

View twokidsnosleep's profile

twokidsnosleep

1063 posts in 1559 days


#5 posted 1518 days ago

I love C&H…. I have passed my Books over to my 8yr old son and he reads them after homework and before bed.
Nice framing, adding it to favorites for yet another project.

-- Scott "Some days you are the big dog, some days you are the fire hydrant"

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1190 posts in 2143 days


#6 posted 1517 days ago

Love it! Where did you get the cartoon?

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1635 days


#7 posted 1517 days ago

Sorry, didn’t mean to get you doubting your dimensions. I was just curious about the logic behind it, as I probably wouldn’t have thought to make the pieces different widths.

I do think it works and as long as the recipient loves it, that’s what counts.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View cjones's profile

cjones

13 posts in 1650 days


#8 posted 1511 days ago

Skully-

There used to be a searchable C&H archive with the actual comics until the copyright owners made them remove it. This was a couple years ago. I copied it from there.

There is a searchable archive online today that tells you what day a comic was published, what book it’s in and on what page, but no image of the actual comics: http://www.reemst.com/calvin_and_hobbes/stripsearch

You can also, of course, go to “zoom pictures” above and just copy it from here if you want…

-- Living well is the best revenge.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2162 days


#9 posted 1511 days ago

cool frame

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2243 posts in 1468 days


#10 posted 1080 days ago

like the frame, love the comic. I grew up reading Calvin and Hobbes, and still have several of the anthology books. I wish I was still of the age where I had Calvin’s view of life.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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