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Small Mahogany and Maple Box

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Project by Duff posted 05-20-2017 09:17 PM 810 views 1 time favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Found a beautiful piece of mahogany and decided to make a small box. The thickness of the mahogany is 3/4”. A little thick for a 6” x 4” box. I’m have been doing any resawing I need tto do on my table saw because I don’t have a bandsaw. That’s been kind of hit and miss so I left this at 3/4”. I did resaw the maple. I’m thinking 1/2 or 5/8” thickness would be better for small boxes. Any feedback from you guys would be appreciated.

-- You have to go on and be crazy. Craziness is like heaven - Jimi Hendrix





12 comments so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

3177 posts in 1960 days


#1 posted 05-20-2017 09:49 PM

It is a beautiful box and STURDY too.

You have every right to be very proud of the excellent work too.

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

View SenecaWoodArt's profile

SenecaWoodArt

388 posts in 1313 days


#2 posted 05-21-2017 04:31 AM

Nice job on this one. I usually use 1/2” on a box of this size. If hinges are used, then I set the wall thickness based on the hinge.

-- Bob

View observer100's profile

observer100

324 posts in 804 days


#3 posted 05-21-2017 04:48 AM

That light and dark wood contrast is always so attractive. Cannot beat a box for creating a woodworking challenge.

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

2353 posts in 1961 days


#4 posted 05-21-2017 05:09 AM

Duff, first let me say you have made a beautiful box. I like the finish, choice of woods, use of splines, and general proportions. I agree it is too thick. 1/2 to 5/8 would be better. If half, then you would need a small hinge. I would only use 3/4 on something really large like a blanket chest or toy box. You have mastered all the basics of box making. You might want to watch this video Ken and I made. It takes you through all the steps in adding a lift and hinges. Keep boxing and keep posting.

-- Big Al in IN

View Duff's profile

Duff

99 posts in 212 days


#5 posted 05-21-2017 12:39 PM

Thanks for the advice guys. Very informative video Big Al. My shop is very small and I don’t have a bandsaw, planer or thickness sander. So for now I have to take my wood to thickness by using my table saw. Not the best way but it will have to suffice for now.

-- You have to go on and be crazy. Craziness is like heaven - Jimi Hendrix

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1287 posts in 916 days


#6 posted 05-21-2017 01:36 PM

You have all the elements in place, nice job 8^)

Resawing on the table saw is not too bad if you have a good rip blade and take multiple passes depending on how ornery your wood is.

The worst part in my opinion is cleaning up the cut, especially burns. A hand plane and plenty of skill to keep the board flat is always good choice. You can also cut shallow kerfs (1” perhaps) on each edge of the board with the TS and then complete the cut with a hand saw. The kerfs are used for alignment.

People have been thinning wood for years without a BS or planer, it just is a bit faster with one!

View ronstar's profile

ronstar

385 posts in 3404 days


#7 posted 05-21-2017 02:08 PM

Very nice box!

-- Ron, Northern Illinois

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5523 posts in 2841 days


#8 posted 05-21-2017 04:41 PM

Fine looking box!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View dalepage's profile

dalepage

249 posts in 534 days


#9 posted 05-21-2017 05:10 PM

I believe you’ll be a lot happier with boxes which are somewhere between 3/8 and 5/8, depending on the size of the box.

As for resawing, I have found that what I lose when resawing on the table saw is no more than the slightest blip in the band saw if the blade decides to follow the grain on a hard piece of maple or walnut. I use a Freud rip blade which makes a cut so smooth that there is very little to sand off, much less plane off like a band saw’s kerf.

Just use feather boards to keep the board against the fence. Also joint a perfect 90 degree edge to put against the table when you saw.

The only downside to this is a board that will not be resawn in two passes, but leaves some wood in the kerf because the width of the board is more than twice the fully exposed blades’ radius,

-- Dale

View Duff's profile

Duff

99 posts in 212 days


#10 posted 05-21-2017 06:50 PM

Thanks for all the input guys. It’s greatly appreciated. I am prototyping a box today and used pine for it. I was able to resaw that to 1/2” easily. When I tried resawing some maple the other day I tripped the breaker. Ah, trial and error!

-- You have to go on and be crazy. Craziness is like heaven - Jimi Hendrix

View chido's profile

chido

45 posts in 64 days


#11 posted 05-23-2017 03:11 PM

good finishing nice work

View Duff's profile

Duff

99 posts in 212 days


#12 posted 05-23-2017 03:14 PM

Thanks Chido

-- You have to go on and be crazy. Craziness is like heaven - Jimi Hendrix

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