LumberJocks

Turn any saw into a kerfing plane (prototype) {aka kerfing saw or rebate saw}

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Project by Combo Prof posted 05-13-2017 07:43 PM 4779 views 3 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch

We had a discussion a while back about kerfing planes in the Handplanes of your dreams thread. Only luban makes a kerfng blade for a combination plane. Otherwise you have to make your own. There are sevral kits around, for example Bad Axe Tool Works and Blackburn Tools or you can cut up an old saw plate and make one. It occurred to me you can turn any saw in to a kerfing plane and still be able to use the same saw for other tasks. So today I did a quick make up of a kerfing plane using a “deep” tenon saw I picked up for $1 in Arizona.

  1. Saw encased in the kerfing plane sleeve.
  2. Fence adjustment
  3. backdoor
  4. removing the saw
  5. slot where the saw goes.

It works just fine, but I think I want a deeper kerf, I’ll just plane down the base a bit.

If I were to do this again I would use a saw with a smaller plate perhaps a gent saw. I would also use a nice hard wood for the sleeve. I might be inclined to make up several sleeves with a fixed fence to kerf at the actual widths I would actually use. Say 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 and 5/8 inch widths. I think.

Updates

Sunday May 14, 2017

What is a kerfing plane used for?

Tom Fidgen was the first to published a “kerfing plane,” in his book Unplugged Workshop, Taunton Press (October 29, 2013).

The idea is to produce a kerf of reasonable depth on all edges of a piece of lumber, and then use that kerf to guide a saw when re-sawing with a frame saw. But any long enough rip saw will work. The idea is that the saw will follow the path of least resistance. See this video by Chasing Rabbets Woodworking or this one by Mitch Peacock – WOmadeOD. Mitch also shows how to rip a board to width.

After thoughts.

Definitely the depth of the cut needs to be increased. It would be better to use a saw blade with a more aggressive cut. I think this works just fine and good enough to give kerfing a try. If you like it then I think it may just be best to buy kit or blade from Blackburn tools or Bad axe tools.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)





22 comments so far

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#1 posted 05-13-2017 11:15 PM

Well there ya go … that’ll work! Good good and good thinking. Kudos!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2738 posts in 914 days


#2 posted 05-14-2017 12:12 AM

Thanks. It actually works really well. I’m not sure I needed it. I just wanted to prove it could be done. On the other hand just when I least expect it I seem to find for that last tool I made or otherwise aquired.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View JohnnyB's profile

JohnnyB

103 posts in 2026 days


#3 posted 05-14-2017 04:04 AM

I see what it is, and I see how it works, but I don’t know what it’s for. What do you do with a kerfing plane?

-- JohnnyB - - Sometimes determination can substitute for skill.

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

290 posts in 125 days


#4 posted 05-14-2017 05:09 AM



I see what it is, and I see how it works, but I don t know what it s for. What do you do with a kerfing plane?

- JohnnyB

+1 what is a kerfing plane used for?

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2738 posts in 914 days


#5 posted 05-14-2017 11:48 AM

Tom Fidgen was the first to published a “kerfing plane,” in his book Unplugged Workshop, Taunton Press (October 29, 2013).

The idea is to produce a kerf of reasonable depth on all edges of a piece of lumber, and then use that kerf to guide a saw when re-sawing with a frame saw. But any rip saw will work. The idea is that the saw will follow the path of least resistance. See this video by Chasing Rabbets Woodworking.

Now I have a 20 inch band saw for re-sawing so I don’t really need it, but it may also help with bandsaw drift. (Well maybe I do need it for re-sawing very large stock—if I ever have it.)

With slight modification it can also be used for cutting the sides of rabbets.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Just_Iain's profile

Just_Iain

68 posts in 53 days


#6 posted 05-14-2017 04:09 PM

Perfect answer (as far as you go) to the question: Can I use a backsaw as the ‘blade’ for a Kerf Saw.

Thanks for photos!

Iain

-- For those about to die, remember your bicycle helmet!

View Don W's profile

Don W

18280 posts in 2204 days


#7 posted 05-14-2017 08:47 PM

cool idea. You need to patent that!

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3805 posts in 1841 days


#8 posted 05-14-2017 09:51 PM

This is a very interesting project and attracted my curiosity as to how a saw becomes a plane.
I like Jonnyb and BenDupre wondered what it was all about also, so I decided to check out all the associated info, apart from the 53431 comments on Handplane of your dreams !!.

The theory behind it is now understood and led me to think the title is possibly in error and should read “Turn any saw into a kerfing saw (prototype)” mailny brecause thats what it is.

I didnt get to find a copy of Tom Fidgen’s “kerfing plane,” in his book Unplugged Workshop, Taunton Press (October 29, 2013) so I cannot verify if my comment is in fact in error.

Regardless the effort put into the presentation of the project and supporting comments is commendable.

The exchange of technical information, (such as this one) to me is what woodworking is also all about.

-- Regards Robert

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2738 posts in 914 days


#9 posted 05-14-2017 11:08 PM

Indeed some call it a kerfing saw where as others call it a kerfing plane. It is also called a Rebate Saw. But I belive the original name was Kerfing plane, see this for some evidence. I have Tom Fidgen’s book on order and will update as needed. Mean while I will augment the title. How is the new title?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1233 posts in 284 days


#10 posted 05-14-2017 11:37 PM



Perfect answer (as far as you go) to the question: Can I use a backsaw as the blade for a Kerf Saw.

Thanks for photos!

Iain

- Just_Iain

Iain – That’s exactly what I used for my kerfing plane/rebate saw ... no matter what we chose to call it … I find it essential for resawing!
 

 
That tiny kerf sure keeps this big guy in line …
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View galooticus's profile

galooticus

34 posts in 538 days


#11 posted 05-15-2017 12:21 AM

Cool idea, prof. I’ve been eyeing the blackburn tools kit (and the frame saw kit too). This seems like a good way to try out the idea of a kerfing plane using scraps without spilling cash for a kit.

-- Andy in CA

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2738 posts in 914 days


#12 posted 05-15-2017 12:43 AM

Scraps is right. I made it out of left over scraps from the Casket (comfy pine box) build.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2738 posts in 914 days


#13 posted 05-15-2017 01:55 AM



cool idea. You need to patent that!

- Don W

Thanks Don. Thats high praise. Are you serious?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3805 posts in 1841 days


#14 posted 05-15-2017 02:42 AM

Hey Don, (Combo prof) The editing wasn’t really necessary, Ihad already worked out the answer!

A bit like Planer thicknesser depending upon which country you are from it means the same to those in the know.

Then there is all the timbers,... Oregon in Aust but known as Douglas Fir in it home state go figure!!

-- Regards Robert

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2738 posts in 914 days


#15 posted 05-15-2017 08:41 AM

No worries. I thought the edit was a good idea. I’m a little surprised many don’t know what it is. I think a better name is simply “a kerfer”. I hope to be in Newcastle in 2019. If I can make it up to Brisbane it will be my shout .. but not four X .. LOL.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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