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Profile scraper (beading scraper)

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Project by rwyoung posted 1438 days ago 3828 views 22 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Decided to fool with making a beading profile scraper. Simple tool, just two L-shaped blocks held tightly together with a small chamfer near the inside corner for dust relief. I used some scrap white oak and 1/4-20 bolts I had lying about. Makes it look industrial but I found it wasn’t uncomfortable in my hands.

I’ve seen others were they didn’t use beefy enough stock for the body and it split under pressure during the scraping. Not as likely to happen with this monster. About 7” long, 2-1/2” wide and each piece is just over 3/4” thick.

The two test blades I made, 1/4” bead and 1/4” flute, are card scraper stock. Just snap off a bit of stock, true up the edges and start filing a profile. Easy way to get the beads to a consistent shape is to paint the card stock with some Dyechem then use a small circle template and a scribe to mark the profile. Attack with files, then stone the two faces to smooth.

To use, just make a LOT of light passes in the wood with the scraper profile pinched in the L-shaped pieces.

Simple and quick way to make small profiles on workpieces. You can file a profile in a scraper that may not be possible to make with a router. Likewise, by clamping stop blocks to the workpiece, the scraper can start and stop the profile cleanly, unlike the rounded entry and exit points you would get with a spinning router bit.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.





15 comments so far

View Stevinmarin's profile

Stevinmarin

837 posts in 1574 days


#1 posted 1438 days ago

This is really cool. I love the fact that the profiles are custom and you aren’t limited to stock router bits. I’m a little unclear on how you make the blades. Do you simply use a grinder? I’d like to try this.

-- Entertainment for mere mortal woodworkers. http://www.WoodworkingForMereMortals.com

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1437 posts in 2064 days


#2 posted 1438 days ago

Looks like a good one. I want to do this too.

Steve, Look here: http://lumberjocks.com/davemoorefurniture/blog/15014 and
here: http://foldingrule.blogspot.com/2008/05/episode-62-scratch-stock-part-i.html

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View rwyoung's profile

rwyoung

369 posts in 1971 days


#3 posted 1438 days ago

@Stevinmarin

No grinder, the scraper stock is too thin. Just clamp it in a vice (machinist vice works better) and file the shape. After the shape is how you like it, just take it to the oilstone/waterstone/sandpaper-on-glass and flatten the faces to remove the burr and square up the edges. No further sharpening necessary. PM me if you need some more pictures to illustrate the steps.

If you don’t have a card scraper to sacrifice, you can use a hack-saw blade. However the bi-metal blades can be a real bear to file. Annealing with a torch first might be in order.

This scraper holder isn’t designed to handle sharp curves, more for straight runs only. To do a sharp curve I would need to make a more “pointed” fence. This could be done by beveling the short side of the “L” pieces to point them a bit. Then it could track a curved profile.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

View dustynewt's profile

dustynewt

639 posts in 2361 days


#4 posted 1438 days ago

Great simple design that would add nice detail to a plain drawer front or face frame. Even I could manage this. Thanks!

-- Peace in Wood ~ http://www.etsy.com/shop/DustyNewt

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2687 posts in 1575 days


#5 posted 1438 days ago

I have seen these but really like yours. I been planning on building one of these and come up with some “Different” designs you just cant find in router bits (or at least I cant…lol)

My big hang up is where do you suggest getting the stones at? Oh yea, i plan on trying stainless steal for my blades. I have no idea if this will work, but I’m a mechanic by trade and have the stuff at work to give it a good working over (OK I admit I can cheat using all kinds of power tools….lol). Plus I have a bunch of scrap laying around the shop….

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9231 posts in 1588 days


#6 posted 1438 days ago

Simplicity rules, I love it. (Even I just bought a old Stanley 66 of e-bay).
I also took a old card scraper, and then used my dremmel tool to make my own profiles.

Here are a few DIY beading links (Scratch Stock), I made some searching, before I bought one:
http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2009/01/page/3/
http://villagecarpenter.blogspot.com/2007/12/scratch.html
http://www.woodworkforums.com/f152/new-angle-scratch-stock-109671/
http://www.shavingsandsawdust.com/projects/molding/index.asp

And here are one for those who have a 66:
http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/readarticle.pl?dir=handtools&file=articles_868.shtml

Thank you for sharing,

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View WilcoFlier's profile

WilcoFlier

55 posts in 1512 days


#7 posted 1437 days ago

Very nice job! You can also use old metalwrok files to make the scrapers. But then they need simple heat treatment.

-- www.hobbyhoutbewerking.nl

View rwyoung's profile

rwyoung

369 posts in 1971 days


#8 posted 1437 days ago

@Maveric777

Um, you can’t find ANY kind of sharpening stone? Oilstone, waterstone, sandpaper-on-glass, loose grit w/ laping plate, diamond plate? It really doesn’t matter. Even the cheap 2-sided $5 oil stone from the hardware store would work fine for this application. Or just glue some 320 or 400 grit sandpaper down a sheet of glass or just on some 3/4” MDF is fine here. Polishing on a 12,000 Shapton is not necessary.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2687 posts in 1575 days


#9 posted 1437 days ago

lol… No bud it is not that I cant find any… I just been so busy trying to learn how to cut a miter joint, miter keys, setting up dado’s. speed setting on routers, (lol… just making the point I am still very new) and haven’t had a chance to sit down and read up on what I need to get it done.

Sorry about the confusion… I was still on my first cup of coffee this morning when I wrote this (the Saki I had last night at the Japanese grill didn’t help none either…lol)

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View rwyoung's profile

rwyoung

369 posts in 1971 days


#10 posted 1437 days ago

Saki might work as a lubricant to remove the swarf if you go with the sandpaper-on-glass method… ;)

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

View Josh's profile

Josh

99 posts in 1521 days


#11 posted 1437 days ago

do you just tighten to bolts down a ton once you put the scraper between the pieces to keep it from changing depths? Or is it that you just don’t put hardly any pressure on the wood?

-- Josh, South Jordan Utah

View rwyoung's profile

rwyoung

369 posts in 1971 days


#12 posted 1437 days ago

@Josh -

The inside surfaces of the “L” pieces were planed smooth so they mate very cleanly, essentially like you would for a glue joint. The bolts get tightened with a wrench but not 600-lb gorilla tight, just tight. And finally, while scraping the profile, you don’t press hard, just hard enough to make a shaving. Lots of light passes are much better than trying to cut the profile in 2 or 3 heavy passes.

I’m less concerned with changes in depth than with the cutter shifting from the fence. However once the cut has been started and depending on the profile, it becomes self-jigging and lateral shifting is less likely.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

View EMVarona's profile

EMVarona

435 posts in 1334 days


#13 posted 1330 days ago

Excellent idea. Simple and low cost. I’ll try that.

-- Ed "Real happiness is one that you share."

View USCJeff's profile

USCJeff

1044 posts in 2567 days


#14 posted 886 days ago

I’ve had this idea on the docket for a long time now. Short on lumber in the shop and don’t feel like making a run for more. I’m about to head out to the cutoffs and try to mark off a few shop projects such as this one. I’ve never used one as I have a healthy supply of router bits and a Bosch Colt to use them with so as not to mess with my mounted router. They seem simple enough. Any issues? I would think as long as you’re holding it firmly it wouldn’t follow the grain or such. Good work. I’m with you on the bolts, overkill, but if it works, whatever.

-- Jeff, South Carolina

View USCJeff's profile

USCJeff

1044 posts in 2567 days


#15 posted 886 days ago

Might be a dumb question, but I can’t tell from the photos as to what the inner sides of the body look like. I’m wondering if you routed a slot for the blades to help with the any lateral pressure or if simply sandwiching it between the pieces and seriously tightening the bolts is enough. I’m thinking a router channel, but can’t see for sure.

-- Jeff, South Carolina

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